Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Daily life
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 27.04.2015, 15:30
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 8,411
Groaned at 141 Times in 122 Posts
Thanked 14,611 Times in 6,217 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Can anyone identify this tree / fruit

Quote:
View Post
I believe it is a Medlar [eng] or Mispeln [german].
I am growing them myself
The leaves are cutely fluffy The fruits are sold early spring now in local shops.
I grow medlars too. But the OP's picture is not a medlar tree. Medlars typically grow in dense clusters and the leaves are a different shape. Furthermore, they are ripe about now, whereas quinces are ripe in autumn. Medlars are evergreen whereas quinces are deciduous.

Medlars are distant relatives of apples so the confusion is understandable. Interestingly, they are also distant relatives of roses.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 27.04.2015, 15:51
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Zurich
Posts: 65
Groaned at 22 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
linros has annoyed a few people around herelinros has annoyed a few people around here
Re: Can anyone identify this tree / fruit

Quote:
View Post
I grow medlars too. But the OP's picture is not a medlar tree. Medlars typically grow in dense clusters and the leaves are a different shape. Furthermore, they are ripe about now, whereas quinces are ripe in autumn. Medlars are evergreen whereas quinces are deciduous.

Medlars are distant relatives of apples so the confusion is understandable. Interestingly, they are also distant relatives of roses.


Agree. the bottoms of the fruits does not look like medlar at all.
Thats nice to hear that you are growing medlars too. May i ask how did you come up with this idea? Is it located in the room? I have 3 and was thinking to plant one in the nature here. Any comments? I am concerned as it is not that cold friendly, but i have a feeling i saw it growing here in ZH.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 27.04.2015, 16:13
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 8,411
Groaned at 141 Times in 122 Posts
Thanked 14,611 Times in 6,217 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Can anyone identify this tree / fruit

Quote:
View Post
Agree. the bottoms of the fruits does not look like medlar at all.
Thats nice to hear that you are growing medlars too. May i ask how did you come up with this idea? Is it located in the room? I have 3 and was thinking to plant one in the nature here. Any comments? I am concerned as it is not that cold friendly, but i have a feeling i saw it growing here in ZH.
I have grown several from seed over the years. At first it was just the fun of watching something grow from seed. I never really had plans to make anything out of them. They make very attractive indoor plants due to the unusual shape of the leaves and always being green. They are pretty robust and can tolerate poor conditions and even a certain level of neglect. They are also immune to most common pests, but to grow really beautiful examples I think you need a lot of sunlight. I always moved mine outside in the summer and brought them back inside for the winter. I read somewhere that they will only produce fruit if average temperatures over the year are in excess of 15 Celcius.

I have actually seen examples that are outside all year. They are somewhat frost tolerant and it helps if you chose a location that won't get too cold and also help by covering the ground and wrapping the lower trunk in gaussian or something similar.

Getting them to flower and bear fruit is more difficult. This is because their fruiting cycle means they blossom in October to November, with the fruit ripening over the winter and being ripe in April or May. That is of course the period that they are most exposed and vulnerable.

To tell you the truth, I cheated with mine. I had one beautiful example that I had to keep pruning as it was way too big for my little appartment. I decided this was not the way to treat such a beatiful tree and had it brought to my Spainish holiday house where it set flower and bore fruit almost immediately. The tree is about 20 years old and never once flowered in all the years it was in my apartment, but that change in climate released the magic trigger.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can you identify this building in Zurich? John_P Other/general 6 05.05.2011 02:49
Can anyone identify this plant? Snowbear General off-topic 4 31.10.2010 11:40
Mysterious spices: can anyone identify them? Suzagna Food and drink 46 08.06.2010 00:08
Help me with my family tree:can you read this? economisto General off-topic 29 15.02.2010 09:16
Can you help us identify this hotel in Basel? Jools52 Other/general 9 06.03.2008 19:47


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 00:26.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0