Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Daily life
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 26.04.2015, 14:10
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Children on fundraising visits

Creating a new thread as it would be mean to consider this as begging at the door (I couldn't think of a good title anyway....)

I had some kids turning up today (losing track of the frequency- possibly the 3rd/4th time in a year) to sell some stuffs to finance their field trip. I have also encountered kids outside the supermarkets with cookies and cakes for the same purpose. Perhaps only for a couple of times over the past 5 years did some kids ask for donations (i.e. without asking this via the "sales" route).

My take on this is based on my experience: I earned pocket money by doing extra work- either at home or in the neighbourhood etc. Thus, I don't necessarily find this to be teaching them any important lessons- apart from how to sell products, appeal to sympathy, be courageous not knowing what they face on the other side of the door, get money with minimal effort,....

Anyone here who could share their thoughts (or different perspectives) on this?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 26.04.2015, 14:53
Mélusine's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Lutry
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 30 Times in 26 Posts
Thanked 4,384 Times in 1,858 Posts
Mélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

I used to do that as a kid here in CH, but not to finance field trips. We were encouraged to do this to help some charities (Telethon, etc.). For field trips, we used to sell baked goodies at the market.

I don't think I would let my kids turn up at people's places now. You don't know what kind of crazy people they could meet!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Mélusine for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 26.04.2015, 14:53
3Wishes's Avatar
Moderately Amused
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bern area
Posts: 6,524
Groaned at 43 Times in 39 Posts
Thanked 9,172 Times in 4,358 Posts
3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

I've not encountered that here, but it is very common in the U.S. When I was in school we only used fundraisers for special occasions, like a big field trip that the school district could not cover, or for our band uniforms, which were also not covered.

I didn't like doing it, and I think the neighbors weren't fans either. However since it was rare they were pretty tolerant and would buy something just to be nice. Back then the products were not all junk - I still have a necklace from my grade 6 fundraiser that is in good shape.

Then there's the Girl Scout Cookies - that's a product pretty much everyone in the U.S. wants and it only comes once a year so the fundraising works well.

Today my friends' kids are constantly selling overpriced popcorn, cookie dough, pizzas, and plenty of non-edible junk. My Facebook feed is cluttered with this stuff on a regular basis, particularly at the start of school.

I guess my philosophy is the small-scale bake sale is fine and can teach kids a valuable lesson. The widespread selling of overpriced junk, not so much. Plus the kids don't get a very good percentage of the price. If I buy a tin of popcorn for $10 the kids only get half or so. I'd rather write a full check for $10 (okay, bank transfer in CH) directly to the local Boy Scout troop or the Band Boosters.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 26.04.2015, 14:57
kslausanne's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 412
Groaned at 39 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 565 Times in 228 Posts
kslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

I agree it doesn't teach them anything, and I'm sure parents don't totally appreciate having to produce baked goods for this purpose. I could understand if the sale was organised at a time and place people actually wanted to consume the stuff. Then it could be a real lesson on marketing, customer service etc.

Why don't kids sell their labour to raise money--reading to their neighbours' kids, vacuuming, washing the dishes, raking, taking their neighbour's PET back to the store (I'd pay serious money for this) etc?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 26.04.2015, 15:27
3Wishes's Avatar
Moderately Amused
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bern area
Posts: 6,524
Groaned at 43 Times in 39 Posts
Thanked 9,172 Times in 4,358 Posts
3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute3Wishes has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
...Why don't kids sell their labour to raise money--reading to their neighbours' kids, vacuuming, washing the dishes, raking, taking their neighbour's PET back to the store (I'd pay serious money for this) etc?
I think because the funds are to be shared among a group of students, so you need the "work" to be somewhat proportional.

I made a lot more money babysitting, mowing lawns, etc. than my peers, partly because I was in high demand. Some of them were in every sport imaginable and had no time to babysit or do other tasks for neighbors, much less help out their own families. Others needed to hold down "real" jobs just to help put food on the table.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 26.04.2015, 16:54
kslausanne's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 412
Groaned at 39 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 565 Times in 228 Posts
kslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond reputekslausanne has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
I think because the funds are to be shared among a group of students, so you need the "work" to be somewhat proportional.

I made a lot more money babysitting, mowing lawns, etc. than my peers, partly because I was in high demand. Some of them were in every sport imaginable and had no time to babysit or do other tasks for neighbors, much less help out their own families. Others needed to hold down "real" jobs just to help put food on the table.
It seems doable--each kid makes a short list of the tasks she is willing/able to perform and establishes an hourly rate. Or the class decides on a universal hourly rate. Then each kid tries to sell x number of hours, let's say 2 at 20chf.

The kids who are busy with sports or supporting their families would presumably have better things to do than spending Saturday morning at the market or knocking on people's doors anyway, so a different scheme would at worst make no difference and at best be more convenient --they could organise their 2 hours as they and their parents wish, and it might seem more credible. As for the proceeds being shared among the whole group, nothing changes-- it's not as if now the kid who sells the most chocolate bars gets the first class bunkbed

I made my own pocket money starting at age 9 with a paper route. It was such a pleasure to see that I could make money using my skills, and gave me so much confidence in myself. Such a fundraising scheme might have the same effect for the many children who don't have the same opportunity. They could even do reflective writing/drawing/presentation task on it afterwards. I'm a teacher, so I like to see the pedagogical value in things children are asked to do, especially at school...
__________________
I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 26.04.2015, 17:46
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Melusine and 3Wishes, thanks for sharing your experience. Perhaps you may know why this type of fundraising (door-to-door; in front of supermarkets) is encouraged as opposed to: asking parents for money, working at home, or working in the neighbourhood? My parents were against the door-to-door (for charities) and their solution was to have me do little tasks at home (including keeping my bedroom neat!).


Quote:
I didn't like doing it, and I think the neighbors weren't fans either. However since it was rare they were pretty tolerant and would buy something just to be nice.
Indeed- it's hard to say "no" to children. And it did cross my mind that they eventually don't make a sizeable profit. It is much easier if they were to turn up and ask for donations (for something I consider worthy- expansion of the school library etc).

As for the trips, I do find it odd if the neighbours are to finance this. For instance, I have come across the children of some neighbouring HNWIs fundraising for their trip in front of the local Migros....
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 26.04.2015, 18:16
Medea Fleecestealer's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Misery-Courtion
Posts: 13,532
Groaned at 171 Times in 135 Posts
Thanked 9,660 Times in 5,514 Posts
Medea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Very good timing for this thread vuachère with May 1st coming up and all the singing kids knocking on doors looking for cash.

Bring back bob a job week I say. Why strangers should be expected to donate money for school field trips is beyond me. It is a form of begging and more insidious because it's your neighourhood's kids who are very hard to refuse. You feel you ought to give something, you feel guilty if you say no, but feel like you've been put upon if you cough up.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 26.04.2015, 18:28
Mélusine's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Lutry
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 30 Times in 26 Posts
Thanked 4,384 Times in 1,858 Posts
Mélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond reputeMélusine has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
Very good timing for this thread vuachère with May 1st coming up and all the singing kids knocking on doors looking for cash.

Bring back bob a job week I say. Why strangers should be expected to donate money for school field trips is beyond me. It is a form of begging and more insidious because it's your neighourhood's kids who are very hard to refuse. You feel you ought to give something, you feel guilty if you say no, but feel like you've been put upon if you cough up.
I must say I've never heard of asking donations for a school trip. For school trips kids normally sell baked goods at the market, in front of local supermarket, etc.

But classes often work on class projects where they help a charity or another, and this can lead to door to door visits.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Mélusine for this useful post:
  #10  
Old 26.04.2015, 19:17
Medea Fleecestealer's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Misery-Courtion
Posts: 13,532
Groaned at 171 Times in 135 Posts
Thanked 9,660 Times in 5,514 Posts
Medea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

The teenage singers who came round on May 1st told me that's what they were collecting for. Don't know what the youngsters were colllecting for though. Luckily they don't bother with our little street so we miss them nowadays.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 26.04.2015, 19:30
MacGregor's Daughter's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 3,187
Groaned at 32 Times in 24 Posts
Thanked 3,563 Times in 1,463 Posts
MacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Around here they come on 5th December for Samichlaus where they get something for themselves and around the 6th of January for Epiphany where they sing and collect for poor children all over the world.
And I have seen students selling cakes and cookies in front of supermarkets for their graduation trip, but never any other kids or students at the door.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 26.04.2015, 23:19
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
I must say I've never heard of asking donations for a school trip. For school trips kids normally sell baked goods at the market, in front of local supermarket, etc.

But classes often work on class projects where they help a charity or another, and this can lead to door to door visits.
Only twice have they asked donations on behalf of charities. It was a trip every other time- skiing, France, Germany, .... (which is why I am trying to find out why they do this fundraising - when there are other ways of achieving their target).
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 27.04.2015, 00:03
Sbrinz's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Murten - Morat
Posts: 10,970
Groaned at 542 Times in 342 Posts
Thanked 10,574 Times in 5,409 Posts
Sbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond reputeSbrinz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

I am sure you realise that children here are not allowed to work. I am sure also that you know that legally all earnings have to be declared and taxed where necessary.

So why is it surprising that children here are begging and selling stuff, to raise funds for their school trip/vacation ?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 27.04.2015, 00:17
MacGregor's Daughter's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 3,187
Groaned at 32 Times in 24 Posts
Thanked 3,563 Times in 1,463 Posts
MacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond reputeMacGregor's Daughter has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
I am sure you realise that children here are not allowed to work. I am sure also that you know that legally all earnings have to be declared and taxed where necessary.

So why is it surprising that children here are begging and selling stuff, to raise funds for their school trip/vacation ?
That's not quite true. They can have holiday jobs from the age of 13 and if they earn less than 2300 sfr there are no taxes or ahv or anything. Over 16 year olds can have part-time jobs. (Look it up in the jugend-arbeitsschutz-gesetz);and a lot of teenagers start apprenticeships at the age of 16, which is work, no?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MacGregor's Daughter for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 27.04.2015, 00:53
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Quote:
View Post
I am sure you realise that children here are not allowed to work. I am sure also that you know that legally all earnings have to be declared and taxed where necessary.

So why is it surprising that children here are begging and selling stuff, to raise funds for their school trip/vacation ?
According to wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_working_age#Europe

Quote:
Age 13: (Must have parental permission; only easy work)
During school weeks: Maximum 3 hours per day; and 9 hours per week.
During non-school weeks: Maximum 8 hours per day; and 40 hours per week.
Age 15: (Must have parental permission)

Maximum 9 hours per day; and 45–50 hours per week. Working maximum until 8 p.m.
Age 16: Minimum age to serve someone in restaurants, café or hotels. Minimum age to work in a circus or cinema.

Working maximum until 10 p.m.
Age 18: Unrestricted (and the minimum age to work in: Bars, Discos, Dancinghalls and Nightclubs)
The source, as MacGregor's Daughter notes: https://www.vs.ch/NavigData/DS_6/M55...18%20Jahre.pdf
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank vuachère for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 27.04.2015, 09:49
ecb's Avatar
ecb ecb is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: out n about - it's summer!
Posts: 2,145
Groaned at 8 Times in 8 Posts
Thanked 3,425 Times in 1,285 Posts
ecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond reputeecb has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

In both the schools my son attended (primary level - Baselland and Jura) this happens about twice a year and is instigated by the school and the task of sellng door to door is given to him as his homework!

To give an example, the most recent one was in the context of a prject they were doing in Geography on endangered species. They had a visit from someone from WWF who left gift cards behind. The children were tasked with selling the gift cards and most of the money went to WWF with an agreed proportion (I cannot remember how much) that the class could keep that went into their class fund for class outings.

As this is instigated by the school, it is hard to not allow your child to join in - although the easiest thing I felt was often to buy a few of the things yourself and then it was done without the need for him door to dooring. In our old village in Baselland, it was wealthy and I know every child in his class came from families with good jobs and incomes. In his current class, over half of them are refugees and money is very tight - the first year we were here, quite a few children did not go on the class outing because they did not pay (for whatever reason) the contribution of 10 chf. Within this context, I am slightly happier to think that money for a class outing can be "earned" so that they all enjoy a day out.

But if i had my choice, I would prefer the "bob-a-job" style of money earning that we used to do when I was growing up ...
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 27.04.2015, 10:31
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SZ
Posts: 7,617
Groaned at 18 Times in 17 Posts
Thanked 15,926 Times in 5,233 Posts
meloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond reputemeloncollie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

The local school does the 'bob-a-job' thing and honestly - I hate it.

School children around here are not used to doing household or garden tasks on their own and so need close supervision. Anything involving tools - even a trowel - is a safety issue so a no-go. Rather than being a help, the school fundraising means that I have to work alongside the children and in the case of garden work, usually then have to re-do the damage they have done. Additionally (and importantly) there are liability concerns with the kids on my property.

An afternoon of bob-a-job means that I am both babysitting the children and paying them.

Because these are neighborhood children I cannot refuse as that would incur the wrath of their parents, making life in the Quartier difficult.

---

Honestly, I'd rather just give the school money.

---

I worked doing odd jobs at these kids' age, it was part of the US midwest suburban culture. I certainly believe that having children work for a goal is a good thing. But to trot out the old cliche, things were different back then. The liability stakes are too high here/now to do this kind of thing.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank meloncollie for this useful post:
  #18  
Old 27.04.2015, 10:36
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: la cote
Posts: 2,777
Groaned at 15 Times in 9 Posts
Thanked 2,154 Times in 1,220 Posts
runningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond reputerunningdeer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

" .... (which is why I am trying to find out why they do this fundraising - when there are other ways of achieving their target)."

Well not sure what you mean by other ways of achieving their target. There really isn't a informal labor market for teens trying to make a few chf for a trip or project, etc.. like there is in other countries. I do not find any odd jobs in the neighborhood etc.. around here. Ways to make money are somewhat limited to babysitting and even that requires classes and training. So the odd bakesale, where you get a sweet treat in exchange for a franc or two seems reasonable.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 27.04.2015, 11:23
Belgianmum's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Was Belgium now Neuchâtel
Posts: 8,217
Groaned at 60 Times in 57 Posts
Thanked 10,239 Times in 4,923 Posts
Belgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond reputeBelgianmum has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Children on fundraising visits

As with many things here in Switzerland this probably varies from canton to canton but here's how it works in Neuchâtel.

The children are not allowed to do 'bob a job' type activities to raise money for trips etc. This is not because they are not allowed to work to earn money( my son's permit even says 'activité lucratif autorisé on it) but for insurance reasons.
The children are covered by the school's insurance for accident or injury etc incurred at school or during an outside activity with the school but would not be covered should anything happen whilst they were doing 'odd jobs' for people as this is not part of the normal school curriculum.
Previously the canton also provided liability insurance for all the kids so if they damaged another person's property or injured so embody whilst doing 'odd jobs' they would be covered by the school insurance but this is no longer the case. Whilst most people are covered by their own personal liability insurance this is not the case for everybody and so the schools won't do anything which could potentially end up costing an uninsured family a lot if money. They strongly recommend families to take out their own cover but they can't I live them to do so.

As ecb said in her earlier post the 'selling' activities in primary school are once or twice a year and are always linked to something they are studying as part of their school studies and involve other things as well as selling. They are always selling things in aid of a charity and they learn about the charity and their work as part of the project.
It usually only involves the upper two years of primary in any case. We usually ended up buying a couple of things ourselves or selling to friends/colleagues etc to avoid the door to door thing but I will always buy something (small) from the kids who come here from the local primary school as we live in a small village. They do seem to share the village out amongst the kids and we never get more than one visit for each thing.

They are not under any circumstances allowed to demand money towards trips or anything else. They can only raise money by offering something in return for the money.

In secondary school things are a bit different. There are no organised sales as such but they do have 'projects'. The Neuchâtel schools support a project in Mali and my son was involved in a drive to collect stationary and drawing/writing equipment to send to them. The class was corresponding with the centre in Mali and they collected donations from individuals as well as businesses in the area.
At the end if the year they organised a sponsored walk in order to raise money for the Mali project and this is the only time they have ever asked for monetary donations. The walk itself was also educational as they had a questionnaire to fill in along the way relating to different things encountered on they way ( flora and fauna, buildings etc) which they had previously studied in class.

They don't raise money for regular school outings and trips. They have an annual budget for outings and a maximum amount that they can ask the parents to contribute to the school trips and it's up to the class teacher to manage this budget.

The exception to this is the end of year trip in the final year of obligatory school (11 th grade Harmos) which us usually a more important event as they will all ve going their seperate ways afterwards.
My son us going on thus trip this year and they have been raising money via all sorts of methods but they are not allowed to demand monetary donations.
The maximum they are allowed to ask the parents to pay is 130chf. There was the option at the start of the year for parents to pay a small amount per month of they wished. The rest of the money they have to raise themselves. They could of course choose a trip which only costs 130chf and not do any fundraising at all but I don't think that has ever happened.

They have :

Sold cakes ( which admittedly the parents made) at the parent's evening ( for a different year who don't have a trip this year) at the school.

Designed a unique class cover for Ragusa chocolate bars and sold them. They had a minimum price to sell them for which gave them a certain amount if profit per bar but if people wanted to pay more they could and they made more profit.

Cooked a three course meal. They designed the menu within a budget, bought the ingredients and cooked it with the help of their cooking teacher. Each class member was requested to have at least two people present at the dinner ( some had more) and we paid 26chf per head for a truly fantastic meal. It was mostly the parents who attended but it was a lovely social occasion.

Baked cakes and cookies at school ( cooking class happens to be Friday afternoon) and sold them on the Saturday market in Neuchâtel which necessitated them being there in shifts from 7am until 1pm. Any profit made after buying ingredients went to the funds.

At the class meeting at the beginning of the year the teacher did say that the fundraising methods generally involved the parents contributing anyway ( you bake the cake which you end up buying yourself etc) but they were trying really hard to get the kids to come up with new ideas all the time. The meal involved an awful lot if time and effort and in reality we as parents are I directly funding the trip but it was a very nice way to do it.

At the end of the day they have raised the money they needed ( and a bit more) and are very much looking forward to their trip to Munich in June.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Belgianmum for this useful post:
  #20  
Old 27.04.2015, 13:10
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Re: Children on fundraising visits

Thanks everyone! So I am concluding that:
1. It is part of the school culture- students must participate. And when it is an accepted culture, everyone else should play along.
2. Earning extra money via odd jobs is difficult given the lack of a market, insurance gaps, and other risks (as stated by meloncollie).

Meloncollie, you raise some risks, but has things truly changed? The outputs of my first few jobs were hilariously tragic- but with time, you learn...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
children, door-to-door, fundraising, school




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fundraising at school carlasmom Education 9 12.06.2013 21:05
Fitness and fundraising biff Daily life 1 01.09.2012 21:42
Fundraising salaries pdonah1 Employment 3 11.01.2012 09:51
US Citizen making frequent visits to EU on a Swiss Student Visa Shlarin Permits/visas/government 2 28.06.2008 12:45


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 16:24.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0