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  #21  
Old 17.01.2007, 15:47
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Heather, you are right, actually the system is with semesters, but this makes it even worse. There are people who graduate high school with 2 credits in history and 1 geography. Such people don't know well even the capitals of Canadian provinces and when you give them the map of the world they are lost. I am a T.A. for first and second year courses in European and World history the last few years and when I give the students geographic quizes, I am terrified with the results, literally! The other thing that freaks me out is that even in high school, the kids need a calculator to figure out how much is 40% out of 12 or 6X8. I know immigrant kids from Bulgaria, Bosnia, and Russia, who come here in 6th grade, but on the tests they showed knowledge for 8th or even 9th grade! If you don't believe me, just see some textbooks in Math, Biology, History, Astronomy, Physics, Ethics, Logic from a European country and compare them with their Canadian equivalents for the same grade. You will be amazed by the difference. On the other hand, I understand why you want to go back to the Great White North. It is the place that you belong to, as well as your closest relatives are there. And as I wrote earlier, people are much friendlier in Canada. I also think I'll never become Swiss. I'll always feel Canadian first and I'll always support Team Canada and Vancouver Canucks even if I live in Switzerland. And yet, life in Switzerland or elsewhere in Western Europe gives me the quality of life that I want, which I don't have in Canada.
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  #22  
Old 17.01.2007, 20:29
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Quote:
Okay - life is that happens to us, while we making plans...some facts about Switzerland.

We have dream to have own house - here it may take us 7-10 years to accumulate 20% own funds to get a mortgage. Is it true that in Canada downpayment for a first house could be even 0%? What are prerequisites for that?

My spouse has no right to work here - nobody will convert her "spouse's'" permit "B" to a "work" one - she is not a skilled specilalist. Maybe after 2.5 years we will aply for "C" permits and then she will get a job then... That's another Swiss "surprise" - in Canada she can look for a job right now. At least a simply one...
You're absolutely right, 0% down is possible here in Canada. IF you have enough credit / income, then the bank will give you a 0% down mortgage. You will need to apply/get a CMHC insurance for the property (mandatory). Usually calculated as a % of the property, this varies depending on how much down payment you are putting. If it is 0% down, your CMHC insurance will be higher than if you put say... 10% down. You can find out further details on the link below:
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/corp/faq/faq_006.cfm

Feel free to msg me if you need any other pointers! GOOD LUCK!

Gee
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  #23  
Old 17.01.2007, 21:19
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

I've not been in Switzerland for very long, but the price cost / finance factor is a definite downer. I had ambitions to buy something here house/condo, no way, Canada I would very easily.

Canada, depends where you live. Montreal, QC is a great town, very European feel and much more affordable then here. Not to mention F1 race in June. Toronto is great as well, excellent lake sports in the summer, and you can actually afford a boat in CA. West is great for skiing, north, well, depends how secluded you're looking to get, but very beautiful the few times i've been camping up there.

One large bonus for CH, is that in CA as in the US, you can drive 36 hours and never leave, whilst here you've about driven through every country and seen a variety of cultures both western and possibly eastern. Needless to say a great experience.

If you've lived here long enough and done enough travel, I'd go to CA. Get more a lot more for a lot less.

As for education systems, you can always afford private school in CA. The University level education systems in North America are nothing to be shy about.

Maybe wait till the kids are ready for private high school in CA and then college down south in the US, 7 of the top 10 globally are located therein. Let them take advantage of the RD money the US govt like to spend.

peace/jg
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  #24  
Old 18.01.2007, 09:54
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

I agree with most of what nj.chuy says except that there is no need to go to the US for university as an undergraduate. There are certainly a lot of US universities that far outperform most Canadian universities in terms of the quality and quantity of their research output (although certain departments in certain Canadian Uni's are on a par with those in the US). However, as an undergrad, that kind of thing doesn't really help you, what you want is some great instructors. At the research-intensive institutions, the prof's focus is not on teaching, and they are not always great teachers (after all, they were hired for their research abilities).

For undergradate studies, the medium-sized universities that have a focus on teaching are the best ones to go to. There are plenty of these in Canada. Only when looking for further education (Masters, PhD) should you consider the research pedigree of the institution. But still then, the compatibility with a potential supervisor is at least as important as the university's reputation.
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  #25  
Old 23.01.2007, 10:47
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

HI!
Well, as someone from Victoria, BC, I'd have to say CANADA! I've been living in Switzerland for almost 2 years, but there are still a lot of great things that I miss about Victoria. Victoria has a lot of what Switzerland has - great mountains, great skiing close by (Whistler is only about 4 hours, or there is skiing on the island too)... but in a way, I think Victoria has more to offer... great Ethnic food - and TONS of it, friendly people that will welcome you and show you a good time, no questions asked... cheaper prices... My Swiss boyfriend found a job there easily - Canadian companies (from what I learnt while he was applying) are willing to hire Swissies cause of their language skills quite easily and really see a Swiss work background as a valuable asset in Canada.
But then again, being Canadian, I guess I am a bit biased!! Good luck deciding - let me know if you want some more info on Victoria or Vancouver!
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Old 25.01.2007, 16:54
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Re: Switzerland vs South Africa

Hello Everyone,

I am an Indian and my husband is a Swiss by national and born in Capetown South Africa.

I was browsing thru this website to find some answers as we have moved to Capetown about 5 months ago from Dubai-Unites Arab Emirates where we both worked for two years.

We had then decided that we need to settle down and have kids, so our first thought was Capetown-South Africa, as my husband grew up in this city.

He speaks very fluent French, and I can also now read and write French.

We are presently comtemplating whether we should move to Switzerland or wait for opportunities in South Africa, which look very grim, as well as , both us being professionals, we do not seem to find the job we are looking for.

Also now that we are deciding to have kids as well as South Africa, not being very safe, would appreciate if I could get some genuine inputs from you guys, so that it becomes easier for us to make that decision.

We do understand that the weather is cold is Switzerland, but that is not the issue for both of us.

Please reply, if any of you have lived, or are exposed to both countries.


Cheers,

B.
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  #27  
Old 26.03.2007, 21:46
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

I would think they ask for 'Canadian experience' ?

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HI!
Well, as someone from Victoria, BC, I'd have to say CANADA! I've been living in Switzerland for almost 2 years, but there are still a lot of great things that I miss about Victoria. Victoria has a lot of what Switzerland has - great mountains, great skiing close by (Whistler is only about 4 hours, or there is skiing on the island too)... but in a way, I think Victoria has more to offer... great Ethnic food - and TONS of it, friendly people that will welcome you and show you a good time, no questions asked... cheaper prices... My Swiss boyfriend found a job there easily - Canadian companies (from what I learnt while he was applying) are willing to hire Swissies cause of their language skills quite easily and really see a Swiss work background as a valuable asset in Canada.
But then again, being Canadian, I guess I am a bit biased!! Good luck deciding - let me know if you want some more info on Victoria or Vancouver!
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  #28  
Old 26.03.2007, 21:48
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Re: Switzerland vs South Africa

i think this thread is CA vs CH...start a new thread for SA. Lot of great info about these two countries on this thread and i hope people add to it.

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Hello Everyone,

I am an Indian and my husband is a Swiss by national and born in Capetown South Africa.

I was browsing thru this website to find some answers as we have moved to Capetown about 5 months ago from Dubai-Unites Arab Emirates where we both worked for two years.

We had then decided that we need to settle down and have kids, so our first thought was Capetown-South Africa, as my husband grew up in this city.

He speaks very fluent French, and I can also now read and write French.

We are presently comtemplating whether we should move to Switzerland or wait for opportunities in South Africa, which look very grim, as well as , both us being professionals, we do not seem to find the job we are looking for.

Also now that we are deciding to have kids as well as South Africa, not being very safe, would appreciate if I could get some genuine inputs from you guys, so that it becomes easier for us to make that decision.

We do understand that the weather is cold is Switzerland, but that is not the issue for both of us.

Please reply, if any of you have lived, or are exposed to both countries.


Cheers,

B.
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  #29  
Old 26.03.2007, 21:50
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

for research-oriented masters degrees yes...but for masters degrees in business or so would CA be equal to US ? (no intent to bring in US here but just wanted to follow up on this comment made by Chris W ?

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I agree with most of what nj.chuy says except that there is no need to go to the US for university as an undergraduate. There are certainly a lot of US universities that far outperform most Canadian universities in terms of the quality and quantity of their research output (although certain departments in certain Canadian Uni's are on a par with those in the US). However, as an undergrad, that kind of thing doesn't really help you, what you want is some great instructors. At the research-intensive institutions, the prof's focus is not on teaching, and they are not always great teachers (after all, they were hired for their research abilities).

For undergradate studies, the medium-sized universities that have a focus on teaching are the best ones to go to. There are plenty of these in Canada. Only when looking for further education (Masters, PhD) should you consider the research pedigree of the institution. But still then, the compatibility with a potential supervisor is at least as important as the university's reputation.
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  #30  
Old 27.03.2007, 00:24
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

WOW,
there are a lot of good comments about the idea of moving.
One thing I did not notice was, the fact that Vancouver has actually a minority of real Canadians, mostly Asians now, with poor English skills.
Another huge point is health care is not as good as it is here, but it depends on the city of course.
Canada is very easy for foreigners to feel at home, but of course poverty and theft can be higher than in Switzerland.
In the west, be prepared for rain, old people, and not so "Canadian" lifestyle.
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  #31  
Old 27.03.2007, 00:37
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Hello,
I have a couple of quesitons about the statements on DP and work permit for the wife. I was considering once buying a house and the bank told me that even though 20% DP is a rule they would not need to follow it in my case as my salary is high enough. I am also in IT and under an impression that in our business, we earn enough for the bank to only require 10% DP. Have you asked them if they would do it for you?
Also, I know several people whose spouses work with B permit, so I don't quite understand why your wife is having problems. Has she tried language schools for instance? When I just came to Switzerland (am Russian too by the way), I was working as a Russian teacher for a language school. It is not lots of money but still a job....
V ljubom sluchaje zhelaju vam udachi!
Anna
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  #32  
Old 27.03.2007, 10:44
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

So then..Can vs Switz

I grew up in Westerna Canada...lived there for 25 years and have moved to Switzerland 2.5 years ago.

there are so many things that I find so similiar about these 2 countries. I know this is true for western canada, but people have a very "outdoorsy" vibe to them...and I get the same feeling here in Switzerland.

Switzerland is like the interieor of BC, without all the towns scattered throughout the mountains.

The mountains are BIGGER here in Switzerland....

The cost of living in the lower mainland (vancouver area) is not far off of that in Switzerland...some things may be even a tad more expensive...

Skiing at the big resorts back home (jasper-banff area, whistler, kicking horse, etc) are probably just as expensive or even more so than a lift ticket at Zermatt, Saas-fee or St Moritz...

Health care is a lot more expensive here...when compared to Alberta...

Gasoline is so much better here...the lowest grade gas used here is a cleaner, higher octane than our supreme gas that we have back home...you get what you pay for. (that applies to so many things here in switz)

yes, taxes are a lot lower here in switz and salaries are generally a little higher when comapred to similiar positions in canada, but there are so many other fees and expenses here that at the end of the day it kinda evens out...but this depends where in canada you are living of course.

canada is cold...especially out in the praries...but it is a DRY cold, so bulking up and heading outside is tolerable. The Swiss cold is so damp that it penetrates through any jacket you are wearing...

Alberta beef is #1...u won't have a better steak anywhere else in the world..i challenge anyone to find better beef...

so then...just a few ramblings from me. of course, it all depends on where you will be, what your job is, how fair the situation is to your family, etc etc. both countries are great...couldn't pick 2 better countries to call home...

...but maybe that is just me!
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  #33  
Old 27.03.2007, 15:34
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Preevyet Cap'n Black:

Difficult decision (forgive me for being obvious). You've gotten a lot of good advice from other forum members, so forgive me if I'm being repetitious.

I'm Canadian, lived in Canada for 31 years, the US for 3, and Switzerland now for 2 1/2. Came here for family reasons (Swiss wife, now 1/2 Swiss kid) and am enjoying it. Some things to consider, droga.

-Swiss taxes are much lower (at least in Provins Valais). In the 80 K CAD range you'll be looking at a graduated tax up to 40+% in Canada. British Columbia when I left CA 5 1/2 years ago had among the highest taxes in the country (after Quebec).
-Switzerland will have a much more European feel to it than Canada (again...obvious), especially outside of Quebec...if that's what you look for...some do (my wife does).
-Switzerland is much more multi-lingual than Canada. Even in Quebec (forgive my continued reference) they are strongly French Canadian. English is more tolerated there than French is in Alberta where I'm from, but Canada is quite...unilingual really for a bilingual country officially.
-Another poster mentioned that Alberta (English speaking, diverse environment, lots of oil, cows and tech work) is booming. Absolutely true. Should be very easy to find work there for both you and your wife.
-Canada is multicultural. Even though some of us will talk about 'real Canadians' being in a minority in Vancouver, we are all real Canadians. There is a strong Russian/Ukranian community in Edmonton and Calgary (both in Alberta) and moreso in other cities as well. Being from Eastern Europe is not a taboo there. Sometimes, I hear that it is more difficult here, especially for kids.
-It will be easier to become a citizen in Canada. If you have more kids there, they will automatically become Canadians.
-Way easier to buy a house in Canada once you establish credit (also relatively easy in a few months time). Do, though, be careful of the American influence of 'over credit'. Companies will sometimes give you just enough rope to hang you with.
-More crime in Canada. Amateurs compared to our neighbours to the south...but compared to here it's the streets of Chicago (nb, compared to Tokyo, its the OK Corral).
-Education system much different than over here, and some fall through the cracks. Honestly, it was my experience that conscientious parents (not mine, of course) make the difference. I have a graduate degree from a Canadian university and I'm a little dumb...but not too bad from time to time.
-Health care system in Canada: way cheaper (some fees in some provinces, mostly state covered), very good professionals involved (wait for it, though), nasty wait times for specialists and specialty procedures/diagnostics, etc (a function of lack of funding, beurocratic crap or whatever due to socialized medicine). I'm told it's turning a corner though.
-People? Like everywhere...some bulletheads and some awesome folks. Most in the middle. Another poster said we spend a lot of time comparing ourselves to Americans. Almost true. We would except that we're just like Americans...just better educated and more polite (small joke there, I think I only compared us to Americans 4 or 5 times, no?).

Schto ti hocheesh dylat? If it were me...I don't know. My wife and I often flip a coin to decide things like this (no kidding). I do know this, though. I have a lot of Russian friends. Those in the upper class want to move to Switzerland. Those in the lower class can't really afford to move anywhere...unless they're involved in something they shouldn't be...then they want to move to Switzerland. Those in the middle class who want to leave Russia are applying for Green Cards to the US or looking for 'Landed Immigrant' status in Canada.

Good luck Captain.

Rico Durakoi
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  #34  
Old 04.04.2007, 05:53
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Living in Vancouver, maybe moving to Zurich

I have read this topic and feel I can contribute some useful information.

I have been living in Vancouver for 17 years. I grew up in Belgium where I graduated with a degree in Industrial Engineering (Wirtschaftsingenieur in german). I have lived 17 years in North Vancouver at the foot of the mountains, and I can vouch for the fact this is a very attractive city.

Over 50% of the population in the Greater Vancouver area is not from Canada! This creates a fascinating place to meet cultures from all over the world. Most of my friends are not Canadians but Serbs (piles of them ;o) ), Russians, French, Hungarians, Mexicans, etc.....

I am very active physically and love the outdoors such as skiing, camping, hiking and mountaineering. And for all those interested in the subject there are many black bears and cougars (pumas) in the local mountains, but that has never stopped me from enjoying the outdoors.

Last but not least the variety and quality of the international cuisine is without comparison! It is a wonderful city to eat out. Prices are modest and the freshness and variety top notch.

Presently I am seriously considering moving to Zurich. Why?

Many reasons that I feel have not been mentioned here but are critical.

1. How many people realize that your degrees (engineering, medicine, nursing, law, accounting, etc) will not be recognized in Canada? This is a seldom mentioned but essential problem for all immigrants to Canada. My degree in Industrial Engineering from an elite university in Belgium is not recognized in Canada. Many of my Serb & Russian friends are not working in their fields because they cannot get their degrees recognized! I know a Russian aerospace engineer working in a beauty salon, another Russian engineer is taking a 4 year course to retrain as an accountant. A Serb engineer with 25 years experience in power generation was refused recognition of his degree due to slight deficiencies in a written English language test. Filipino nurses are not allowed to work as nurses (their degrees are recognized in the UK (my sister is a nurse in London UK) but not in Canada. Iranian or Indian doctors cannot work in the medical field at all!

2. Canadian income levels are nowhere as high as some people are thinking. My physiotherapist friend Ljiljana from Belgrade, Serbia with 20 years experience and (after several years of additional study) a Canadian degree has a gross salary of $65,000 Cdn. She is single and taxes are about 40%. A top engineer (IF and only IF your degree is recognized !!!) with 15 years experience can expect an income of $100,000 Cdn (net about $60,000 Cdn). Many friends work in the IT industry where their incomes are $50,000 to $80,000 Cdn gross (net about 40 % less). This supposes Canadian work experience.

3. Cost of living. The biggest expense is housing. To purchase an appartment it is true that you can get low downpayments (under certain conditions 0% but that is rare, generally banks prefer 20%). But the actual cost of appartments is high. My 100 m2 (1100 square feet) appartment in North Vancouver is $400,000 Cdn. In the city of Vancouver the same appartment is over $600,000 Cdn. The average house price in all of Greater Vancouver is over $550,000 (this includes a very wide area, about 25 km in diameter). In Vancouver city houses are over $900,000 and in North Vancouver close to $700,000. And as someone else mentioned on this forum what you get for those prices would qualify as "shacks" in many cases compared to Belgium (or Switzerland).

4. It is common for Vancouver residents to be spending 45-50% of their income on housing (rent or purchase). This does not leave much for all the jewels of life in Vancouver (ski pass at Whistler-Blackomb is about $75 per day, golfing costs about $50-80 for green fees, etc).

The income that is being negotiated in my case in Zurich for an international company would be 2-3 times what I would earn after tax in Vancouver!

If anybody is interested in a more in-depth discussion of these matters I am available...

Great forum and thank you to all for your patience in reading this.

Beaumecxxx
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  #35  
Old 04.04.2007, 14:32
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

I lived in Vancouver BC almost my whole life, met my Swiss husband there and moved with him here almost 2 years ago. We have two small kidlets, 1 and 2 and half. I miss the oceon, the cheaper prices, the general a bit more friendly easy going mentality, the BEACH(o man really the beach I miss). My husband had no problem working there or finding a job although he wasn't Canadian, only a permanent resident. Since the West Coast is completely use to foreigners or immigrants, it is I feel a part of our identity, multiculturalism, and it is more embraced, people are not expected to conform, although people must learn English(but many people don't in Vancouver!!) My husband could become Canadian after 3 years, I have to wait 10, I really don't feel 'at home' here, and might not for a really long time. I miss the open wide land also. I like the wild life in Canada, seeing bears on the way to visit my grandparents in Calgary was common for us, but always a thrilling moment, right from the forest..

In general we are seriously thinking about going back, although Switzerland is pretty, I prefer Canada(as of now, I am open to changing).
Also I have met quite a few Swiss who have homes in Canada and go for the entire summer, and are planning on retiring there!
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  #36  
Old 04.04.2007, 17:00
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

well then both CH and CA have their positives. Do you really have to choose ?


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I lived in Vancouver BC almost my whole life, met my Swiss husband there and moved with him here almost 2 years ago. We have two small kidlets, 1 and 2 and half. I miss the oceon, the cheaper prices, the general a bit more friendly easy going mentality, the BEACH(o man really the beach I miss). My husband had no problem working there or finding a job although he wasn't Canadian, only a permanent resident. Since the West Coast is completely use to foreigners or immigrants, it is I feel a part of our identity, multiculturalism, and it is more embraced, people are not expected to conform, although people must learn English(but many people don't in Vancouver!!) My husband could become Canadian after 3 years, I have to wait 10, I really don't feel 'at home' here, and might not for a really long time. I miss the open wide land also. I like the wild life in Canada, seeing bears on the way to visit my grandparents in Calgary was common for us, but always a thrilling moment, right from the forest..

In general we are seriously thinking about going back, although Switzerland is pretty, I prefer Canada(as of now, I am open to changing).
Also I have met quite a few Swiss who have homes in Canada and go for the entire summer, and are planning on retiring there!
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  #37  
Old 04.04.2007, 17:04
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Re: Living in Vancouver, maybe moving to Zurich

How about your own 17 year experience as you had a degree from Belgium ? Did you do fine or was your degree also not 'recognized' ? Because if you did fine, it means that European degrees are recognized.

Obviously Vancouver is great for outdoors. Great info on the housing prices provided here.
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I have read this topic and feel I can contribute some useful information.

I have been living in Vancouver for 17 years. I grew up in Belgium where I graduated with a degree in Industrial Engineering (Wirtschaftsingenieur in german). I have lived 17 years in North Vancouver at the foot of the mountains, and I can vouch for the fact this is a very attractive city.

Over 50% of the population in the Greater Vancouver area is not from Canada! This creates a fascinating place to meet cultures from all over the world. Most of my friends are not Canadians but Serbs (piles of them ;o) ), Russians, French, Hungarians, Mexicans, etc.....

I am very active physically and love the outdoors such as skiing, camping, hiking and mountaineering. And for all those interested in the subject there are many black bears and cougars (pumas) in the local mountains, but that has never stopped me from enjoying the outdoors.

Last but not least the variety and quality of the international cuisine is without comparison! It is a wonderful city to eat out. Prices are modest and the freshness and variety top notch.

Presently I am seriously considering moving to Zurich. Why?

Many reasons that I feel have not been mentioned here but are critical.

1. How many people realize that your degrees (engineering, medicine, nursing, law, accounting, etc) will not be recognized in Canada? This is a seldom mentioned but essential problem for all immigrants to Canada. My degree in Industrial Engineering from an elite university in Belgium is not recognized in Canada. Many of my Serb & Russian friends are not working in their fields because they cannot get their degrees recognized! I know a Russian aerospace engineer working in a beauty salon, another Russian engineer is taking a 4 year course to retrain as an accountant. A Serb engineer with 25 years experience in power generation was refused recognition of his degree due to slight deficiencies in a written English language test. Filipino nurses are not allowed to work as nurses (their degrees are recognized in the UK (my sister is a nurse in London UK) but not in Canada. Iranian or Indian doctors cannot work in the medical field at all!

2. Canadian income levels are nowhere as high as some people are thinking. My physiotherapist friend Ljiljana from Belgrade, Serbia with 20 years experience and (after several years of additional study) a Canadian degree has a gross salary of $65,000 Cdn. She is single and taxes are about 40%. A top engineer (IF and only IF your degree is recognized !!!) with 15 years experience can expect an income of $100,000 Cdn (net about $60,000 Cdn). Many friends work in the IT industry where their incomes are $50,000 to $80,000 Cdn gross (net about 40 % less). This supposes Canadian work experience.

3. Cost of living. The biggest expense is housing. To purchase an appartment it is true that you can get low downpayments (under certain conditions 0% but that is rare, generally banks prefer 20%). But the actual cost of appartments is high. My 100 m2 (1100 square feet) appartment in North Vancouver is $400,000 Cdn. In the city of Vancouver the same appartment is over $600,000 Cdn. The average house price in all of Greater Vancouver is over $550,000 (this includes a very wide area, about 25 km in diameter). In Vancouver city houses are over $900,000 and in North Vancouver close to $700,000. And as someone else mentioned on this forum what you get for those prices would qualify as "shacks" in many cases compared to Belgium (or Switzerland).

4. It is common for Vancouver residents to be spending 45-50% of their income on housing (rent or purchase). This does not leave much for all the jewels of life in Vancouver (ski pass at Whistler-Blackomb is about $75 per day, golfing costs about $50-80 for green fees, etc).

The income that is being negotiated in my case in Zurich for an international company would be 2-3 times what I would earn after tax in Vancouver!

If anybody is interested in a more in-depth discussion of these matters I am available...

Great forum and thank you to all for your patience in reading this.

Beaumecxxx
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  #38  
Old 04.04.2007, 18:08
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Hi Danny,

Do you mean do I have to choose where to live?? Well, yes, actually I do, I can only live in one place at a time.. Sorry I am not sure if I understand your question?? But at the moment, just to make it clear, I would choose Canada, but it is not that easy just to pick up and move in regards to finding new jobs etc...But yes I do agree with you both CH and Canada have both good qualities. But in the end, we do have to choose where to live..
Elle
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Old 04.04.2007, 19:48
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Re: Canada vs. Switzerland

Hello Danny, let me explain a little about my situation in Vancouver.

My degree in Industrial Engineering (5-year full-time degree from Belgium) was not recognized in Canada nor was my experience internationally (I have lived in 5 countries including Canada) viewed as an asset.

My travels mean I have three mother tongues (English, Spanish annd French) which I speak perfectly plus very good German (plus Flemish and I started studying Russian and Serbian). These languages were never of any use professionally, more like a curiosity than anything else.

So in my case I have struggled to find decent stable employment because my skills (diploma, languages, international experience, mobility) were not deemed to be assets. I am now 46 and in a "mid-life crisis". Do I stay here with no prospect of anything being radically better in the future than my last 10 years? Or do I change countries?

My recent interest in Zurich stems from an interview I had with a Swiss engineering company. The company kept stressing how I had a unique and valuable set of skills. They are particularly keen on me taking over international sales of their equipment (large multi-million gas compressors) because they cannot find people with those assets (I am also very knowledgable about compressors).

Last point: Vancouver is not a city where there are many companies working internationally. Other than some IT development that has international sales, most of the companies here are either focused on the US market or just British Columbia. Alberta has many more internationally active companies, but other issues such as degree recognition remain.

Hi to all and my best wishes for a fine day
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Old 04.04.2007, 20:03
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Verify your degree recognition before moving to Canada

Danny, one more point briefly.

On average immigrants are much better educated than the general Canadian population. Nonetheless degree recognition is the key to being successful professionally in Canada. Without that recognition you are going to be blocked in the types of jobs you will be offered.

When I was talking about difficulties obtaining degree recognition I was refering to all nationalities, including West European. There are far more immigrants from Eastern Europe (many Serbs, Russians, Romanians, some Ukrainians and Poles, etc). In my opinion their quality of education is excellent, often better than Canadian.

Yet all people (including many Asians among them) face the hardship of not working in their field. There are thousands of university-eduated Chinese who are working "survival jobs", just because they want to stay here.

If you are 25 or 30 years old you still have options of companies hiring you with the view of training you. But once you are in your 40's or worse 50's employers are very reticent about hiring a foreigner with little "Canadian experience" and no recognized degree.

That is all for now
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