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Old 21.05.2016, 23:53
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

You may simply ask the doctor or if feel uncomfortable with that, than the secretary or surgery department what is needed to be operated by a specialist.

You can usually pay the difference, but sometimes it is 10s ouf tousends of franks.
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Old 22.05.2016, 00:09
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

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You may simply ask the doctor or if feel uncomfortable with that, than the secretary or surgery department what is needed to be operated by a specialist.

You can usually pay the difference, but sometimes it is 10s ouf tousends of franks.

thanks for this note, i will for sure inquire, i wasn't even aware of that option. thats why i love this forum, there is always somebody who knows
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  #23  
Old 22.05.2016, 09:04
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

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i don't mind sharing a room, it's mostly the student -doctor that gets me nervous.


btw, is it commo to share a mixed room, both man and woman together, ot can you actually ask for women only? anybody knows?thanks!
No mixed gender wards. Only place I've seen that is in the Netherlands and i believe it's not so common anymore. And for sure, no mixed gender on gyn floors.

For what it's worth, I had a lumpectomy 5 years ago at the Lindenhofspital in Bern. My gyn did my surgery and I was in a room for 4 women, although only myself and another woman were there at the time. The care was excellent. You should talk to your own physician about your concerns.

I think it's really a misnomer to call a resident a student doctor. But on the other hand, it's your body and you want the most qualified person doing the surgery. I had my gall bladder removed in the US at a teaching hospital in 1995. I know that the attending surgeon was there. But there were also a bunch of surgical residents and so I don't know who did the surgery, or part of the surgery. It went well, though.
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Old 22.05.2016, 13:13
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

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No mixed gender wards. Only place I've seen that is in the Netherlands and i believe it's not so common anymore.
Mixed gender wards were quite common for a time in the UK, not sure if it's still the case now. It was also not unusual to have wards with 8 or even 16 beds in them, usually in groups of four. They usually kept the groups of four beds as either all women or all men but they were essentially mixed wards.
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Old 24.05.2016, 23:27
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

I unfortunately have a lot of experience with the CHUV as I stayed there for five weeks at the beginning of the year before and after my newborn daughter had surgery. I am from Canada and am generally all for public healthcare, but I have to say that the experience was excruciating, in large part because it is a teaching hospital.

The issue is not really that there are residents performing surgeries or other duties -- I don't doubt that all surgeries are conducted only by qualified people and under appropriate supervision. However, the problem for me was the sheer number of staff we'd have to deal with, the turnaround rate, and the strict hierarchy that all of the staff adhere to that is impossible for any outsider to understand. We would see at least 30 different people every single day -- cleaners, care workers, nurses, more important nurses, social workers, student doctors, assistant doctors, "chef de service" doctors, "cadre" doctors, etc. etc. The next day it would be 30 new people (I exaggerate, but only a little... nurses generally work three days but not necessarily the same rooms, and doctors could stick around up to five days before disappearing to a completely different part of the hospital, never to return). Despite our dossier being thrown around like a hot potato and the entire CHUV staff (more or less) knowing about our situation, we never knew who to talk to. When I tried asking questions I was usually told that I was talking to the wrong person (even at the end of the five weeks I'd failed to memorise their coloured badge identification system). We were also moved six times in the two weeks before the surgery, always for convenience and/or space issues rather than any medical reasons.

Let me be clear that I am not complaining -- my daughter was born with a defect, she was diagnosed and operated on quickly, and is in good health today, and for that I am very thankful. But these teaching hospitals are incredibly confusing and chaotic, and I at times was under the impression that they were doing their utmost to make an already difficult situation completely unbearable. If I or someone in my family had to go through another surgery, I'd be looking into my options, especially if a longer stay were in the cards.

Oddly enough, we met very few Swiss people during our five week stay. Most patients and their families were international.
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Old 25.05.2016, 09:58
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

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I unfortunately have a lot of experience with the CHUV as I stayed there for five weeks at the beginning of the year before and after my newborn daughter had surgery. I am from Canada and am generally all for public healthcare, but I have to say that the experience was excruciating, in large part because it is a teaching hospital.

The issue is not really that there are residents performing surgeries or other duties -- I don't doubt that all surgeries are conducted only by qualified people and under appropriate supervision. However, the problem for me was the sheer number of staff we'd have to deal with, the turnaround rate, and the strict hierarchy that all of the staff adhere to that is impossible for any outsider to understand. We would see at least 30 different people every single day -- cleaners, care workers, nurses, more important nurses, social workers, student doctors, assistant doctors, "chef de service" doctors, "cadre" doctors, etc. etc. The next day it would be 30 new people (I exaggerate, but only a little... nurses generally work three days but not necessarily the same rooms, and doctors could stick around up to five days before disappearing to a completely different part of the hospital, never to return). Despite our dossier being thrown around like a hot potato and the entire CHUV staff (more or less) knowing about our situation, we never knew who to talk to. When I tried asking questions I was usually told that I was talking to the wrong person (even at the end of the five weeks I'd failed to memorise their coloured badge identification system). We were also moved six times in the two weeks before the surgery, always for convenience and/or space issues rather than any medical reasons.

Let me be clear that I am not complaining -- my daughter was born with a defect, she was diagnosed and operated on quickly, and is in good health today, and for that I am very thankful. But these teaching hospitals are incredibly confusing and chaotic, and I at times was under the impression that they were doing their utmost to make an already difficult situation completely unbearable. If I or someone in my family had to go through another surgery, I'd be looking into my options, especially if a longer stay were in the cards.

Oddly enough, we met very few Swiss people during our five week stay. Most patients and their families were international.
I think it's a normal issue with teaching hospitals anywhere in the world. I gave birth in a "universitetssykehus" in Norway, in my case it wasn't student doctors but student midwifes who kept coming in and out of the room, and student nurses who kept checking on junior while he was at intensive care. As you say, it gives a pretty chaotic impression, and neither the birth nor the first week after will go down in the books as a memorable, intimate experience. But the little guy is alive and so am I.

The positive side is that you often get the cutting edge treatment from these research cum teaching hospitals. When my mother was operated for liver cancer in Montreal she probably had an entire class of doctors in the operating room, but they did some pretty advanced procedure and she's still there to tell the tale and about how she felt like she was an animal at the zoo when they had the rounds in her room.

On the other hand, some small private clinics might be very cosy and personnal, but not have the top notch equipment and specialists you would need for a complex procedure. They might even have to transfer you to a bigger hospital if you have serious complications.

OP, I get your reservations, and if I was you I would mention it to the hospital, althoug for my part I would definitely trust a CHUV team to do a good job on me.
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Old 25.05.2016, 10:33
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Re: anybody experience with surgery in Switzerland / CHUV Lausanne hospital?

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I unfortunately have a lot of experience with the CHUV as I stayed there for five weeks at the beginning of the year before and after my newborn daughter had surgery. I am from Canada and am generally all for public healthcare, but I have to say that the experience was excruciating, in large part because it is a teaching hospital.

The issue is not really that there are residents performing surgeries or other duties -- I don't doubt that all surgeries are conducted only by qualified people and under appropriate supervision. However, the problem for me was the sheer number of staff we'd have to deal with, the turnaround rate, and the strict hierarchy that all of the staff adhere to that is impossible for any outsider to understand. We would see at least 30 different people every single day -- cleaners, care workers, nurses, more important nurses, social workers, student doctors, assistant doctors, "chef de service" doctors, "cadre" doctors, etc. etc. The next day it would be 30 new people (I exaggerate, but only a little... nurses generally work three days but not necessarily the same rooms, and doctors could stick around up to five days before disappearing to a completely different part of the hospital, never to return). Despite our dossier being thrown around like a hot potato and the entire CHUV staff (more or less) knowing about our situation, we never knew who to talk to. When I tried asking questions I was usually told that I was talking to the wrong person (even at the end of the five weeks I'd failed to memorise their coloured badge identification system). We were also moved six times in the two weeks before the surgery, always for convenience and/or space issues rather than any medical reasons.

Let me be clear that I am not complaining -- my daughter was born with a defect, she was diagnosed and operated on quickly, and is in good health today, and for that I am very thankful. But these teaching hospitals are incredibly confusing and chaotic, and I at times was under the impression that they were doing their utmost to make an already difficult situation completely unbearable. If I or someone in my family had to go through another surgery, I'd be looking into my options, especially if a longer stay were in the cards.

Oddly enough, we met very few Swiss people during our five week stay. Most patients and their families were international.
This.

If you have something complex, you really want to go to an AMC (academic medical center). But the downside is that as an educational institution, you have to work through all the levels.

I had my gall bladder removed in an AMC in the US. Great care, excellent docs, etc, but a constant stream of people, all trying to learn.

in Switzerland, cantonal hospitals might be a touch better. I had surgery at the Lindenhofspital in Bern. It's sort of a private/public hybrid - i have only the compulsory insurance, was in a 4 person room, but my own physician did my surgery. I believe Triemeli in Zurich is like this too. Don't know about hospitals in Romandie.
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