Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Food and drink
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08.05.2015, 20:26
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,355
Groaned at 368 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 22,366 Times in 10,062 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Edible wild foods ...

Would be nice to share info on edible wild foods. Just read an article about pickling dendelion buds - as we have 1000s in our field, I'll give it a go.

Remember that if your source of wild garlic at low altitude is coming to an end, there will be plenty ready in a week of two higher up. If anyone wants to come and pick wild garlic with me in a couple of weeks.- you'd be welcome.

Plenty of young nettles and comfrey at the moment to make soup or to braise like spinach.

So, what is your favourite wild foods and what do you do with it?
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Odile for this useful post:
  #2  
Old 08.05.2015, 22:01
pilatus1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Luzern
Posts: 915
Groaned at 118 Times in 76 Posts
Thanked 2,200 Times in 856 Posts
pilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

I'm currently starting to make a batch of dandelion wine. Picking the dandelions is the easy part - but i spent maybe 12 hours removing the petals from the bitter sepals and stalks. Hoping to make 20 liters.

Ive never tried it myself, but it's said to be great. Ill post how in turns out, when it's ready....2018? It'll be a test on my patience...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10.05.2015, 00:14
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Lausanne
Posts: 7
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
nemesis_fk has no particular reputation at present
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Hi,

I was just preparing to start a new thread about this, but I thought I could slightly hijack yours :-).
My grandmas back at home used to make tea out of herbs they would pick themselves from the woods/hills. As I am a Computer Scientist and never paid attention to what they were putting in my drinks, I have no idea how the plants look like...

Do you happen to know of any guide about Swiss plants that are good for infusions? Or some general guides that are applicable to the region?

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10.05.2015, 00:51
FunnyBone's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Earth
Posts: 495
Groaned at 24 Times in 18 Posts
Thanked 705 Times in 325 Posts
FunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Can one cook the wild garlic flowers, too? Does anyone use and know how to prepare mistletoe?

I use:

Plantain (plantago major) - A friend of mine used the leaves to make bite size rolls for me once - they were tiny compared to the cabbage rolls or even the dolmades.

Red clover flowers for tea.

Dandelion greens - sauté; preferably before it flowers (younger plant => less bitter)

Last edited by FunnyBone; 10.05.2015 at 00:52. Reason: specify which kind of garlic :D the wild one :D
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10.05.2015, 00:55
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,355
Groaned at 368 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 22,366 Times in 10,062 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

The wild food books I have are from the UK- I have none from here- but some booklets, etc, I've picked up here and there.

For infusions, I use plants from my garden mostly- melissa (lemon mint) and other types of mint- and every year I buy a verbena plant (never managed to overwinter it) for verbena infusions (verveine in French). There are however 100s of plants in the wild you can use for infusions/teas- with different effects on the body. If you tell me what you want it for- I could look up some plants from the Jura which would help.

Do you have a balcony or garden. I could let you have a large pot with a large melissa plant in it (the lemon mint) as I have a spare- another with different sorts ot mint- and then you could buy a verbena from a garden shop. In the UK I had huge rosemary plants I used for infusions too- must get one again this year- but they won't survive the winters up here.

Some people pickle the wild garlic flower buds and the wild dendelion buds too. You can also make cordial with elderflowers and also at this time of year, with the new soft green 'buds' from spruce (sirop de sapin). There are so many leaves you can cook with, as said, comfrey and nettles, but many more. Too late tonight- but will try and add more tomorrow.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10.05.2015, 01:07
vuachère's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Vaud
Posts: 548
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 334 Times in 188 Posts
vuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of manyvuachère has earned the respect of many
Re: Edible wild foods ...

(Haven't done this here yet...) Blackberries in late summer. I pick these and make jams.

I have also seen Linden trees around, but am yet to harvest the flowers.

Apart from these, I am trying to cultivate rosemary on my balcony.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10.05.2015, 01:13
FunnyBone's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Earth
Posts: 495
Groaned at 24 Times in 18 Posts
Thanked 705 Times in 325 Posts
FunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond reputeFunnyBone has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Hi, Odile,

I've tried before spruce-flavoured honey. Do the buds of any kind of pine tree work? How long does it take to flavour the honey? Any recipe? Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10.05.2015, 01:58
uca uca is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Zurich
Posts: 60
Groaned at 4 Times in 3 Posts
Thanked 29 Times in 18 Posts
uca has earned some respectuca has earned some respect
Re: Edible wild foods ...

My parents used to make sirop from spruce buds every late spring. We would go to the mountains to pick the buds. There were only spruces though, not pine trees. The buds were an obvious light green at the tip of the braches.
Below is the receipe copied from my mother's Notebook. I never made it though and I don't recall seing it followed...but the sirop was good . Maybe someone around here has the time and patience...

Fill half of a 10l pot with spruce buds and then fill up the pot with water. Boil for 30'. Strain & squeeze, then let the deposits settle down. Strain again with a fine sieve ( through a clean cloth) and measure the liquid obtained. For 3l of liquid add 2kg of sugar and boil again, until it thickens "just like any sirop".( I just love these wordings in old recepies... one of the reasons I never tried it)

The sirop is also good for throat ailments. Back home it is sold as alternative medicine for sore throats.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank uca for this useful post:
  #9  
Old 10.05.2015, 02:28
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 5,101
Groaned at 188 Times in 147 Posts
Thanked 6,059 Times in 3,274 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Has anyone seen nettle (urtica dioica) here?
Or wild sorrel..hmm, I miss them.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10.05.2015, 08:17
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Zürich
Posts: 784
Groaned at 87 Times in 56 Posts
Thanked 1,206 Times in 549 Posts
TobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond reputeTobiasM has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

I would love to do a foraging course, or a Mushroom gathering course in Autumn, very hard to tell whats edible or not.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10.05.2015, 08:20
edot's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Winterthur
Posts: 4,856
Groaned at 21 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 6,199 Times in 2,797 Posts
edot has a reputation beyond reputeedot has a reputation beyond reputeedot has a reputation beyond reputeedot has a reputation beyond reputeedot has a reputation beyond reputeedot has a reputation beyond repute
Edible wild foods ...

There's a guy at the Oerlikon market selling stinging nettle. (Brennnessel) At least he was a few weeks ago. I can't recall his name, but he was in the 2nd long row on the side near the train station.

Last edited by edot; 10.05.2015 at 09:27.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank edot for this useful post:
  #12  
Old 10.05.2015, 10:36
st2lemans's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lugano
Posts: 18,068
Groaned at 924 Times in 720 Posts
Thanked 19,589 Times in 9,430 Posts
st2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond reputest2lemans has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Quote:
View Post
Has anyone seen nettle (urtica dioica) here?
Pretty much everywhere.

I use gloves to pick them, but my wife uses her bare hands!

I should make some nettle risotto.

Tom
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank st2lemans for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 10.05.2015, 11:20
TiMow's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Fribourg
Posts: 9,310
Groaned at 292 Times in 196 Posts
Thanked 12,189 Times in 5,300 Posts
TiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Does roadkill count?

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/Roadkil...ail/story.html

http://www.allotmentmum.co.uk/would-you-eat-roadkill/


Quote:
View Post
Has anyone seen nettle (urtica dioica) here?
Nettles are common, everywhere.

They shouldn't be completely pulled up, either as a weed in the garden or food, as they provide a habitat and food for caterpillars, before they pupate into butterflies.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank TiMow for this useful post:
  #14  
Old 10.05.2015, 11:29
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,355
Groaned at 368 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 22,366 Times in 10,062 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Thanks for the recipe Uca. I also found one in my old school (Neuchâtel) cookery book. A friend of mine picked loads last year and was not wearing her glasses at the time of adding sugar (brown- yes it does exist here) - and poured in a bag of .... bulgur (cracked wheat) - she was!

Never made it myself, I have to say. As kids, we used to pick the buds and eat them raw- I tried yesterday and it brought back lots of memories (as only smells and tastes can do)- you can use them to mix in with salad leaves too- I also use borage and marigolds in salads, especially 'taboulé' (usually made with bulgur for us, rather than couscous- prefer the texture) - it looks wonderful. Daughter numero uno gave me a pack of white borage when she last came to visit- and will plant out today- and have got lots of the blue plants coming up now. Borage seeds explode when ripe and sew themselves quite a distance from the mother plant- so at times in the wrong place- but I am very tolerant of them as the little bright blue flowers are so wonderful.

We have 2 wild flower fields that are attached to this house, and there is lots and lots of wild sorrel and nettles in parts- and I've added a few plants of comfrey, to make fritter and also as a compost activator and to make liquid fertiliser with nettles. Again, as kids we used to eat lot of wild sorrel, as we loved the lemony acid taste- I ate so much one day that I had the runs for a couple of days- I often go and pick a few leaves to eat raw- but must say I've never cooked with it. Any recipes out there anyone can recommend.

If anyone wants to come and pick fresh young nettles which are guaranteed not to have been sprayed or been anywhere near spraying or pollution- just come up- you are welcome.

We also will have, soon, lots of Reine des Prés- must look up the name in English. A tall plant with plumes of white flowers (go and get one of my books, back in a mo)... one of my 'Bibles' Roger Phillips 'Wild Food' (with recipes and advice on avoiding tragedies!) but it's not in there- will come back to it later.

For wild garlic (and most wild foods like nettles, dendelion, etc) only young plants have the best taste and texture- so by the time the plant is in flower- it is too late to use really (hence a previous post saying that if your stash in the plant is finished, go and find another at higher altitude- if anyone wants to go for a lovely walk by a stream where there is tons end of May- beg June- just come along- happy to share).

In the field we also have 1000s of 'cardamine', or lady's smock in English (cardamine pratensis) with very pretty mauve flowers. The leaves have a hot, strong flavour and can be used in sandwiches or salads.

The bain (sp?) of my life in the perenial border (typical English cottage garden- very apt for an old Vicarage) is 'ground elder'(Aegopodium podagraria)- I tried to eradicate it before planting all the plants brought from the UK - but the white roots are so rampant and deep- I didn't manage- and it is a constant battle. But I've just seen in the book that it was introduced in the UK by the Romans as a culinary and medicinal plant (it is supposed to be excelllent against gout- in many regions of uk it is called 'goutweed'. In Russia and Lithuania it is still used in salads. But it is excellent to use as a veg, and cook as you would spinach.

Hey, sorry about long post. But as you might have guessed, foraging is in my blood as I learnt as a child with my parents- especially mushrooms of every kind and wild fruit in the autumn - alpine straberries (we have lots growing wild in the garden), raspberries and blackberries as well as elderberries.

Will be making lots of elderberry cordial (sirop in French) later- the taste is just so good. The red/black elder I brought from our uk garden is perhaps my favourite tree here- the dark finely cut leaves are wonderful all year- and the flowers are the softest of pink (not out yet) and make pink elderflower cordial.

Roger Philips book 'Wild Food' ISBN 0-320-28069-4

I also have a small booklet from 'La Salamandre' - Romandie wildlife, fauna/flora magazine, which I just love (a great present to yourself or anyone who loves nature, really.

www.salamandre.net

You can buy the mini-guides separate. This one is

No 25 - Croquer les plantes sauvages (3CHF) and is excellent for local plants to eat and what to do with them, and how to spot dangerous plants which are similar. Bonne chance et bonne cueillette. Anyone wants to learn a bit more about the above plants- just come along.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Odile for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 10.05.2015, 11:43
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: CH
Posts: 5,101
Groaned at 188 Times in 147 Posts
Thanked 6,059 Times in 3,274 Posts
greenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond reputegreenmount has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Quote:
View Post
Pretty much everywhere.

I use gloves to pick them, but my wife uses her bare hands!

I should make some nettle risotto.

Tom
Yeah, that could be a problem for me too.
I would make a soup or purée with garlic and smetana. Also throw in some polenta...
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10.05.2015, 12:25
amogles's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 8,400
Groaned at 141 Times in 122 Posts
Thanked 14,576 Times in 6,201 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

http://www.ediblebugshop.com.au/
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank amogles for this useful post:
  #17  
Old 10.05.2015, 13:02
TiMow's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Fribourg
Posts: 9,310
Groaned at 292 Times in 196 Posts
Thanked 12,189 Times in 5,300 Posts
TiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond reputeTiMow has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

This is the future in solving world hunger - free and abundant.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10.05.2015, 13:25
pilatus1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Luzern
Posts: 915
Groaned at 118 Times in 76 Posts
Thanked 2,200 Times in 856 Posts
pilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond reputepilatus1 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Quote:
View Post
The bain (sp?) .....
Bane... old english.. reminded me of daisy fleabane, another wild edible.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank pilatus1 for this useful post:
  #19  
Old 10.05.2015, 14:37
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,355
Groaned at 368 Times in 275 Posts
Thanked 22,366 Times in 10,062 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

Thanks, and thanks even more for the great website- with lots of info. It is very much USA based- and the names of plants are often different (the use of Latin here really helps)- and there is also a great FB link- with lots and lots of info. Great.

Had to come in from garden, as it is the first day of the year that it is too hot to work out here
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10.05.2015, 16:02
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Geneva and Nendaz
Posts: 1,063
Groaned at 8 Times in 6 Posts
Thanked 1,178 Times in 490 Posts
SuisseRomand has a reputation beyond reputeSuisseRomand has a reputation beyond reputeSuisseRomand has a reputation beyond reputeSuisseRomand has a reputation beyond reputeSuisseRomand has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Edible wild foods ...

For those who understand french, I can only recommand François Couplan's books about edible wild foods.

A must to have.

Bon appétit
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank SuisseRomand for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Edible Weeds Rachimus Food and drink 6 01.12.2013 17:48
Edible flowers anilinlondon Family matters/health 22 23.11.2012 18:39
Edible Playdough Recipe BokerTov Food and drink 23 20.11.2011 14:12
wild wild Mies ( bank robbery in the night ) grynch Daily life 10 21.05.2010 15:27
edible silver foil Bindu Food and drink 1 23.02.2010 10:19


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 19:45.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0