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  #2581  
Old 20.04.2016, 10:24
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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How can they be cooked badly?

Tom
Undercooked is the main mistake I can think of.
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  #2582  
Old 20.04.2016, 10:50
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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How can they be cooked badly?

Tom
Many times the outer side gets overdone (burnt infact) and the inner stays undercooked.
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  #2583  
Old 21.04.2016, 14:31
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Gordon Ramsay's Chocolate Swirl Cheese Cake

I prefer the UK way of making cheese cake to the Swiss way I got taught in home economics. It has more substance and is often a bit coarser in a way and I particularly like the crunchier bottom made with Digestives (oh don't start me on Banoffee Pie).

This is now a firm family favourite.

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  #2584  
Old 23.04.2016, 14:18
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Margherita con l'anciova

2 portions

- 5-6 tablespoons olive oil
- 1 roughly chopped garlic clove
- 2 fork-fulls of anchovies
- 3 tablespoons of tomato puree
- 1-2 ladles of starchy pasta water
- 2-3 tablespoons of a mix of pine nuts and raisins
- 1-2 tablespoons of sugar
- 400 grams tripoline pasta but you can also use linguine or any pasta of your liking

pangrattata
1/2 cup of breadcrumbs
teaspoon of garlic powder
1-2 tablespoons of olive oil
some seasoning - pepper optional
One thing leads to another, I loved the sound of this and, based on what was in the cupboard today, came up with:

This is a dish born from a need to cook without leaving the house. It will be obvious that it welcomes variation. We loved it and will be sure to make it again soon. The initial inspiration came from reading a post acmilan did on The English Forum (Switzerland) where he shared his recipe for Margherita con l'anciova. The combination of anchovies, tomato paste, pine nuts and raisins got my mouth watering.

Ingredients for sauce for two:

1 medium onion, chopped fairly finely
1 heaped tblsp tomato paste
1 tblsp pine nuts
1 tblsp dried sultanas (or similar)
olive oil
anchovies to taste, I used about 5
chopped fresh spinach
a little sugar
To serve: grated parmesan

Method:

While waiting for the water to boil for the spaghetti, heat a large pan (I use a wok) with the olive oil and gently fry the onion. When softened add the anchovies and break up as you stir. Add the pine nuts and sultanas, stir. Next, the tomato paste and some water. Mix thoroughly and turn heat up. When at a simmer, add sugar, erring on the side of not enough, mix, taste and add more if desired. Last, in goes the spinach. Bring back to a simmer, stir, and leave to sit on a low heat, stirring from time to time while the spaghetti is cooking. I leave this quite thick, as….

When the spaghetti is cooked, spoon it into the sauce. Some cooking water will transfer as you do this, loosening the sauce. Thoroughly mix and decide if you need to add more of the cooking water.

Serve with the grated parmesan.
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  #2585  
Old 23.04.2016, 15:53
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Penne al pistacchio! Penne in pistachio sauce

A very traditional recipe, with many variations. This is how we make it.

- Penne for two people - you can also use any pasta of your liking.
- 3/4 cup pistacchio
- 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
- 1 clove of garlic chopped
- 2 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice
- 2 tablespoons of olive oil
- 1 cup of warm double cream
- good handful of grated parmesan
- 1 teaspoon of sea salt - optional

The sauce for this pasta has to be eaten immediately, as it will thicken the longer it sits

Have a pot of boiling salted water and add all the penne to it.

If your pistacchio is salted, rinse the pistacchio with cold water and dry with kitchen towel in order to remove the excess salt.

In a frying pan, saute' the pistacchio with a tablespoon of butter on medium heat until it gives off a lovely nutty / toasty aroma. make sure not to burn it.

Transfer the pistacchio to a blender and blend until the pistachio is minced.

Add the rest of the melted butter, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and salt and again pulse until well blended.

Add the mixture to a frying pan on low heat and then add the warmed cream and mix until well incorporated. If its very thick, add a little pasta water.

Once the pasta is al dente, add it to the sauce a toss until all the pasta is well coated in the sauce. Add the pasmesan and again toss until well mixed. Add a couple of tablespoons of the pasta cooking water to the sauce as it will help to moisten it, if its too thick.

Serve immediately - some grated parmesan on top is optional. I also sprinkle on some halved pistacchi or some whole ones.
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  #2586  
Old 23.04.2016, 16:14
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Mushrooms filled with feta and wrapped in bacon
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  #2587  
Old 23.04.2016, 18:17
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Penne al pistacchio! Penne in pistachio sauce

A very traditional recipe, with many variations. This is how we make it.
This looks divine - and vegetarian too, always handy as although we are not, lots of our friends are. I will be trying it during the week for sure!
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  #2588  
Old 23.04.2016, 21:19
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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This looks divine - and vegetarian too, always handy as although we are not, lots of our friends are. I will be trying it during the week for sure!
awesome. let me know what they think of it.
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  #2589  
Old 26.04.2016, 11:21
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Hazelnut & Almond and Dark chocolate chip Cantuccini

- 500 grams 00 flour

- 150 grams butter unsalted

- 250 grams caster sugar

- 4 eggs beaten

- ½ cup of rum or any liquor of your liking. amaretto is also good. If you don't
want to use a liquor, then just some juice - orange juice works fine

- 2 tablespoons vanilla extract

- 1 zest of lemon

- pinch of salt

- 50 grams whole almonds, 50 grams whole hazelnuts and 50 grams dark
choco chips. If you want to just make almond cantucci or hazelnut or just
choco chips, then use 200 grams





In the food processor, add the flour and the sugar. MIX. Then add the vanilla, salt and the butter (cut up the butter into pieces and then add). MIX.

Whisk the eggs well and then add to the mixture and MIX well

Add the rum and the zest of lemon and MIX well

Take the mixture out and put onto the working surface. Sprinkle some flour on top so it doesn’t stick. Knead a little with hands and form into a ball! Cut off one third of it and form that into a ball and then flatten it out a little, pour the chocolate chip on top and form it in so it incorporates well into the dough! Into the other two thirds, again form into a ball, flatten out, pour the hazelnuts and almonds and again form into a ball so it's mixed in well! Cut that ball into two so you have three balls of dough

Roll the dough into a cylindrical shape with hands! Thick and long enough to fit onto your baking tray!

Place each onto a baking tray lined with parchment with space in between them!

Put in a pre heated oven at 180 degrees for about 40 minutes

Take out of the oven and begin to cut the cantuccini into bite size pieces. Place them back onto the tray sideway down and put them back into a pre heated oven at 200 degrees for 5 minutes and then turn over and bake the other side for 5 minutes until nicely golden and toasted on both sides! Take out of oven and allow to cool on cooling rack! Can even be eaten warm!

Best eaten with some vin Santo!
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  #2590  
Old 26.04.2016, 11:32
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Hazelnut & Almond and Dark chocolate chip Cantuccini


In the food processor, add the flour and the sugar. MIX. Then add the vanilla, salt and the butter (cut up the butter into pieces and then add). MIX.
May I ask:

(1) I guess I can mix by hand, don't need a processor?

(2) Do they last well in an airtight container? Or maybe I could freeze part of the dough and defrost before cooking?
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  #2591  
Old 26.04.2016, 11:39
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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May I ask:

(1) I guess I can mix by hand, don't need a processor?

(2) Do they last well in an airtight container? Or maybe I could freeze part of the dough and defrost before cooking?
Hi there

1. I don't see why you can't mix by hand. The dough is supposed to be sticky. My only issue with doing is by hand is blending the butter into the flour might be tricky. the butter is supposed to be at room temp and soft, so it might be a messy affair. do you have a blender? it works just as well in a blender as well. If not, then try and do the mixing with a big fork.

2. Aw absolutely. There's nothing in there that will go off quick. Using fresh
eggs would be a good idea. I haven't frozen the dough before, so again it
might be for you to try and see how it turns out. the amount listed made a
good amount to last for a couple of weeks. otherwise, just half each
amount and make less. actually, making half might also make it easier if
you're making it by hand.
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  #2592  
Old 27.04.2016, 13:50
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Schnitz und Drunder an Argovian dish...pure soulfood...and very warming, since spring has given way to winter a-bloody-gain.


I just made this for us for lunch, and thought I may just as well share it with you, it was one of my published NST, Traditionally Swiss columns, enjoy!



EE

-----------------

It’s a typical farmer’s meal originating in the canton, prepared and cooked with what grows locally. This very filling dish contains - the funny name suggests it - dried apple slices. As for this dish, it’s better if one uses the really dark dried apple slices with the rind instead of the white steamed and dried apple rings. You can get the dark ones in a Reformhaus, but of course the recipe works as well with the white apple rings, but might not be as ‘fruity’ tasting.
You’ll also need potatoes for this dish, making for a special mix of flavour, but you will be very surprised when you taste the end product. This makes for the ‘Schnitz’. The ‘Drunder’ is lean smoked bacon.
This really old Swiss recipe shows that the fancy for fusion cooking, mixing fruits and meat or different main flavours, was already well known to the peasants in Switzerland some centuries ago.
This rustic meal is also very easy to prepare. Once you put the ingredients in the casserole/Dutch oven, you only have to wait until it’s cooked to enjoy it.

SCHNITZ UND DRUNDER
250gr dried apples, in rings or wedges
500gr rather waxy potatoes (mealy ones would just fall apart)
500gr lean, smoked bacon

2 tbsp. sugar
20gr butter

1 tsp. salt
(optional) 4-6 dried pears in wedges

Soak the dried apple wedges overnight in cold water or for 2-3 hours in hot water, but in either case, use only so much water that the fruit is just about covered.
Put the butter into a cast iron casserole/Dutch oven, add the sugar, and allow the sugar to caramelize. Then add the soaked fruit together with the liquid, stir well, and place the bacon on top.

Cover the pot and let cook on medium heat for about one hour. Should the liquid evaporate, add some more water.
In the meantime, peel the potatoes and cut into chunks. Add the potatoes to the pot after an hour, together with the salt and a little water. Cover pot again and cook for another 30 minutes on medium heat. Then cut the bacon in portions and place on top of the dish, which is best served in the pan




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  #2593  
Old 27.04.2016, 14:01
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

A quick, almost off topic question.

When I post pictures of the dishes, they seem soooo big, too big for my liking really.
Google Photos has no means of resizing before posting and on the laptop i have Picasa.

Any hints or tips for me , that my pics in future will be a better size?
I am a "common and garden" laptop user with not much specialist knowledge.

So as not to fill the thread with computer posts, any hints and tips are very welcome as PM.

Thanks a lot in advance

EE
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Old 27.04.2016, 14:47
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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A quick, almost off topic question.

When I post pictures of the dishes, they seem soooo big, too big for my liking really.
Google Photos has no means of resizing before posting and on the laptop i have Picasa.

Any hints or tips for me , that my pics in future will be a better size?
I am a "common and garden" laptop user with not much specialist knowledge.

So as not to fill the thread with computer posts, any hints and tips are very welcome as PM.

Thanks a lot in advance

EE
If you are using windows based pc the easiest way to resize images is "image resizer for windows" when you install this it will add new context menu under right click of your mouse. You just need to right click on image (or more of them) and choose resize. Popup window will appear, choose size (e.g 1280x720) and if you want originals to be replaced check that box-click rezise and you are done. Actual add on for windows can be downloaded HERE
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  #2595  
Old 27.04.2016, 16:06
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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A quick, almost off topic question.

When I post pictures of the dishes, they seem soooo big, too big for my liking really.
Google Photos has no means of resizing before posting and on the laptop i have Picasa.

Any hints or tips for me , that my pics in future will be a better size?
I am a "common and garden" laptop user with not much specialist knowledge.

So as not to fill the thread with computer posts, any hints and tips are very welcome as PM.

Thanks a lot in advance

EE
Open the photos in paint and you'll be able to resize them there no problem.
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  #2596  
Old 28.04.2016, 14:29
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Okay okay, I hold my hands up!



I haven't cooked this today and the appertaining column has had a few happy returns as well.
I was fiddling around with the hints and tips I got about resizing pix .
THANK YOU acmilan and Radulle!! And I think, this Blondie here, got it and wants to prove it in this post.


Hope you enjoy reading it all the same.


----------------------------------------------





Bernese Platter

Whenever I am starting to write a new column, I always want to remain as accurate as possible, close to history, seasonal events and Swiss traditions. This is the reason why I am presenting you in this column with the history of the famous BERNESE PLATTER. Some of you may know it or perhaps have even tasted it already. It’s usually served during the winter, as it is quite a heavy and fat-laden dish. Its origin can be dated back precisely to the 5th of March in 1798,on that day the first historically mentioned *Bärner Platte* has been served!
This was the day when Bernese troops won over the French army at the battlefield of Neuenegg, despite being outnumbered threefold by the French. Unfortunately, whilst the brave soldiers were fighting, the French army marched into Bern anyway and the general battle was lost. Three times the brave Swiss soldiers had to be told to stop fighting; they simply couldn’t believe that the war was lost………………

Upset, sad and angry the soldiers decided to take leave and go back home. A Dragoner (cavalryman) who was far ahead of the troops went to have a drink at the Restaurant Kreuz in Wohlen and told the people there that the battle was lost and that the men were returning home. So the women of the village wanted to rustle up some good food as the men would surely be very hungry - if not starving - after all. They all went to raid their stocks in their cellars, smoking houses and pantries. One contributed a whole leg of pork, others gave sausages, hams, bacons and many other good things. As it was early March, there were no fresh vegetables available yet, so they opened their preserves consisting of dried green beans, sauerkraut and sour beets (Sauerrüben) and vast amounts of potatoes.
All available pots and pans were in use that day and great was the joy when the soldiers finally arrived. Quickly they were ushered into the restaurant. So that every man would get his fair share of the goodies, the meat was cut up in even slices and heaped high atop the vegetables. As soon as everyone sat down, the plates were served with meat piled high on top of everything.

This dish comes in almost as many varieties as the Canton of Bern has got villages. I won’t write down a recipe, but will list what belongs on a traditional Bernese Platter if you want to make one at home. Perhaps you would want to go try it in a restaurant.

The meat is the key ingredient to this dish - smoked bacon, ham, sausages, saucissons, braised beef, and many varieties of salted and smoked pork. The meats being accounted for, add either Sauerkraut/Sauerrüben and/or dried green beans to serve along with it, and last but not least, boiled potatoes.
This needs quite some time to prepare, but can be left to simmer on the stove. It would make an ideal menu to serve when you have a large number of guests to cater for, although it’s not suitable for vegetarians. I often serve mustard along with it that has been flavoured with horseradish, as this helps the digestion of the fatty meat.
In the Canton of Bern the die-hard lovers of this dish finish it off with………………………a giant meringue and whipped cream!
©sylv06




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  #2597  
Old 30.04.2016, 13:04
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Long Fusili with porcini mushrooms!

- Tagliatelle or any pasta of your choice for two people
- 2 Tablespoons of olive oil
- Pinch of salt to taste
- Pinch of black pepper to taste
- 1 cup of double cream
- Good handful of dried porcini mushrooms - rehydrate for 30 minutes in
lukewarm water
- 1 Tablespoon of unsalted butter
- Handful of fresh parsley roughly chopped
- Handful of grated parmesan or pecorino
- Truffle shavings optional

soak the porcini in lukewarm water for 30 minutes!

Add the pasta to boiling salted water

In a high sided frying pan on low heat, add a couple of tablespoons of olive oil and butter and allow the butter to melt.

drain the porcini but keep one ladle of the water

Add the porcini to the frying pan and sauté. Then add a the ladle of the water the porcini were rehydrated in and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Pour in the cream and allow to simmer.

Once the pasta is al dente, drain and add it to the frying pan and toss until well coated in the sauce. If the mixture is thick, then add one of two ladles of the pasta water. It will also help to give the sauce a gloss. Season accordingly with salt and pepper to taste. Add the grated pecorino or parmesan and toss until well mixed

Just before ready to serve, roughly chop some fresh parsley and add. serve topped off with some pecorino or parmesan and truffle shavings - optional
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Old 05.05.2016, 12:39
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Choc chip & banana tea cake!

- 180 ml of melted unsalted butter
- 60ml canola oil or vegetable oil
- 150 grams caster sugar
- 2 eggs
- 1 ½ teaspoons pure almond extract or almond liquor
- 60 ml water
- 180 grams 00 flour
- 2 teaspoons baking powder
- 1 teaspoon sal
- 80 grams dark choc chip and 80 grams chopped bananas
- 50 grams raw sliced almonds
- a little powdered sugar for dusting

pre-heat oven to 175 degrees Celsius

using a little butter, rub the butter all over the base and sides of the tart tin. this will stop the tart from sticking. you can also use baking spray.

in a large bowl, combine the melted butter, canola or vegetable oil and the sugar. gently mix it well until combined. then add the eggs and mix it in well into the mixture using a whisk. add the almond extract and water and again gently whisk until combined.

in another bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and salt and blend well with a fork. begin to add the flour to the wet mixture little by little and blend it with a whisk. the whisk will mix it more gently and it will result in a lighter dough. then add in the choc chips and bananas and blend in gently with a spatula!

transfer the batter into the tart pan and smooth out the surface evenly all over with a spatula. top off with the sliced almonds. then grab hold of the tart till, give it a little shake from side to side and tap it gently on the counter as that will even out the batter across the pan.

place in the pre-heated oven and cook for about 25-30 minutes. the cake will be ready when its golden brown on top. alternatively, you can put in a toothpick and if it comes out clean, then its ready.

take out of the oven and leave it to rest completely before attempting to remove from the tart tin. this cake is supposed to be eaten at room temp.

take out of the tart tin and garnish with some powdered sugar. serve with tea or coffee.
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Old 05.05.2016, 16:04
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it is NOT cooked or baked, just a Swiss tradition and a drink



This tree was the one my cousin erected in 2006 to his then loved one nowadays they are married and have 3 kids.
I love driving through my region at the moment, everywhere you can see these Maytrees/ Maypoles put up and I they always make me smile.

So here's another excerpt I did once for some magazine.....hope you enjoy to read it...and do give the Maybowle a try, it is really yummy!

Maytrees and Maybowle

During the month May of you can spot in rural villages, funny looking pine trees, erected in front of a house. Not only have those trees just a wispy top, also the bark has been peeled off. It’s decorated with colourful cotton ribbons and other things and has a nameplate engraved with a girls’ name nailed on it.

What purposes have those funny trees?

To explain this I need to go way back in time.

To put up a May tree is a custom that dates back to a Celtic Feast of Cleaning and Fertility called Beltane who took place at the night from 30th April to 1st of May, when spring was waved goodbye and summer welcomed, where people could burn their winter bedding and floor coverings, ready to be replaced afresh. Bonfires were lit so that a narrow passage existed between two fires that cattle and other livestock would be led between the fires, to purify them from disease or sterility for the coming year and on the next day they would be taken to the summer pastures in the Alps. Torches of dried sedge (Riedgras), gorse (Stechginster) or heather (Heidekraut) were also lit and carried around remaining flocks or stables, to further purify the air.............

It was a time of fertility and unbridled merrymaking, when young and old would spend the night making love in the Greenwood. In the morning they would return to the villages, bearing huge budding boughs of hawthorn and other spring flowers with which to bedeck themselves, their families and their houses.


The raising of the maypole on Beltane is an ancient tradition that belongs to all lands, with Celtic intervention. The Maypole, a phallic symbol, represents the masculine. The soft, colourful ribbons that decorate it represent the feminine. The union of the two symbolizes the union of the god and goddess.

Enough of historical background now, in Switzerland the custom is widespread only in rural regions such as the Emmental, Seeland area, parts of Canton Solothurn and Baselland.

In some villages, it’s the young men who have to enter the military service that year who set up the poles, in other communities its the boys who just left school who honour female companions with an adorned tree.

The boy groups get the trees needed usually from the community or farmers, together they then peel off the rind and place coloured ribbons and other decorations on the wispy top of the tree, at night they set up with joined forces the tree in front of the house of a loved one. When the work has been done, the boys ransack the village gardens and carry gates, garden furniture, flower pots and the like away and deposit the plundered stuff in the village square.

To be the receiver of so much admiration sounds lovely, doesn’t it?? Only there’s a slight hiccup connected to this honour………….

The girl, who received such an adorned tree, has to invite all the boys for a home cooked meal within in the following year.
If she fails to thank the boys with a meal, the next year she’ll get a TOGGU, a straw doll with ugly decorations set up in front of her house.

Of course the same boys will take down the may trees at the end of the month!!

The recipe below is a traditional Maybowle recipe, usually wilted woodruff (Waldmeister) would be added, but I personally can’t stand it, so I swapped it for elder blossoms, which’ll give it an equally good taste.

Mind you, when the trick playing I described above takes place, the young guys rather drink a beer or two or three, than to rustle up a Maybowle.







MAYBOWLE


4 -5 Elder Flowers (Holunderblüten)
2 tblsp. Elderflower syrup ( Holunderblüten Syrup)
1 Lemon, cut in slices
2 bottles White Wine, chilled
10 leaves Peppermint, washed
250gr / 8oz .Strawberries, washed and cut in slices
1-2 tblsp. Sugar
1 bottle Sparkling White Wine, chilled



Place the flowers in a large bowl and cover them with the elderberry syrup. Add the lemon slices and 250ml (1 cup) of the white wine. Place bowl in the fridge and let stand for 1 - 2 hrs. (Allows the flavours to mellow).

Shortly before removing the marinating flowers, cut the strawberries into slices, put in bowl and add the sugar. After the “soaking time” is up, remove the flowers from the bowl and add the peppermint leaves, strawberry slices and the rest of the white wine. Just before serving, add the sparkling wine!
Enjoy this drink carefully, as the fruits soak up the alcohol - you'll get tipsy quicker than you think!




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Old 06.05.2016, 11:04
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

A very traditional dish from the Abruzzo region....Pallotte Cac'e ov! Simple...very much cucina povera and easy to make.

ps. the peppers and onions should really be chopped very fine, but I gave the sauce making job to my little cousin, who is still getting to grips with a knife.

For the pallotte:

- 170 grams of roughly chopped up white bread (remove crust before using
- 100 grams of grated parmesan
- 100 grams of grated pecorino (if no pecorino, then use just parmesan or
another grated cheese)
- 1 whole egg
- pinch of pepper
- small pinch of salt
- small handful of finely chopped fresh parsley
- 200ml whole milk
- Good amount of vegetable, sunflower or rapeseed oil to fry the pallotte in.

For the sauce:

- 250 grams tinned plum tomatoes / passata
- 2 whole garlic cloves
- small handful of finely chopped green pepper
- one whole onion finely chopped
- olive oil
- handful of fresh basil

To make the pallotte, add the bread to a big bowl and pour the milk over it. Using hands, blend the milk into the bread so it forms what is almost a rough dough.

Add the cheese and again blend in really well.

Add the egg and again blend in really well.

Season with some black pepper and then add the parsley. once again using hands, blend the parsley into the dough until well incorporated.

The portion of each ball should be a tablespoonful. Dampen the palm of hands a little with water when forming the balls as it will be less sticky.

Add enough vegetable oil to a pot that will allow for half of each pallotte to be submerged. Once the oil is very hot, add the pallotte and allow it to brown well before turning over and allowing it to brown and fry well all over.

Whilst the bottom side is frying, keep the top side hot by spooning the oil over it. Once the pallotte are golden brown, remove and rest on some kitchen paper.

To make the sauce, add the olive oil to a frying pan on medium heat. Once hot, add the whole garlic cloves and allow it to flavour the oil.

Then add the onions and pepper and cook for 4-5 minutes. Then pour in the passata, season with salt to taste and allow to cook for about 5 minutes.

Rip some basil leaves roughly with hands and add to the sauce. Once the basil leaves have wilted into the sauce, begin to add the pallotte to the sauce and have them fully submerged in the sauce.

You can then serve topped off with some black pepper.
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