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Old 16.12.2016, 17:49
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Another Drippy cake
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Old 26.12.2016, 04:05
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

I'll missuse this thread a little (in order to produce something):
What is evaporated milk?
The recipe asks for a can sweetened condensed milk which is clear to me.
BUT it also asks for a can evaporated milk. What would that be in Switzerland? (Can't be just unsugared condensed milk as the procedure applied seems different).
Could it be "Kaffeerahm"?
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Old 26.12.2016, 04:51
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

You can use Kaffeerahm, or look for kondensmilch ungezuckert (unsugared condensed milk...which I believe is what the UK call evaporated milk). Migros definitely has the unsugared condensed milk in tins.
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Old 03.01.2017, 11:38
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

love this post sharing of our baked goodies. i am not a strong baker just starting out. but this birthday cake is so easy to make and affordable
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Old 03.01.2017, 11:39
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Does it have a recent MFK? They look like summer tyres.
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Old 03.01.2017, 15:44
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Does it have a recent MFK? They look like summer tyres.
funny
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Old 03.01.2017, 15:45
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Another Drippy cake
wow this looks beautiful ! great job..
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Old 09.01.2017, 00:18
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Chilli and lemongrass chicken!

For chicken marinade:
  • 350 grams skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 cloves of garlic finely chopped
  • 2 lemongrass stalks finely chopped
  • 1 red chili de-seeded finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce

Cut the chicken into bite size pieces and place into a bowl! Add the chopped garlic, lemongrass and chilli and make sure the chicken is well covered in it!

Add the fish sauce and give all a mix. Cover the bowl, place in fridge to marinade for at least 20 minutes - ideally overnight!

For the sauce:
  • Half a red onion roughly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons rapeseed or vegetable oil
  • 100ml chicken stock
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1-2 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon mild / medium curry powder
  • Small handful fresh herbs - mint, coriander and basil torn with hands

Add the oil to a wok or frying pan on medium to high heat! When the oil is hot, add the onions and saute for a few minutes! Then add the chicken and allow to saute until the chicken has some good color!

Add the curry powder and mix so the chicken is well coated in the curry powder

Add the sugar, fish sauce and chicken stock, give it a good mix! Have the sauce simmering for about ten minutes until the sauce has reduced!

When ready, turn off the heat and add the fresh herbs and mix it into the sauce! Serve with some rice!
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  #2769  
Old 09.01.2017, 00:50
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Chilli and lemongrass chicken!
Nice! Never thought of chopping the lemon grass - used to take it out after cooking. Why do you de-seed the chili?
I think I'd fry that in coconut oil.
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Old 09.01.2017, 01:22
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Nice! Never thought of chopping the lemon grass - used to take it out after cooking. Why do you de-seed the chili?
I think I'd fry that in coconut oil.
All thai and Vietnamese curries and curry pastes make use of either the lemongrass being finely chopped or properly squished in pestle and mortar! To achieve the best result, I place the chili, Garlic and lemongrass in a mini blender and blitz until very finely chopped and mixed together! Make sure to only use the bottom part of the lemongrass - the softer part! The top part is more woody!

Coconut oil might be OK, though I suppose like olive oil, it is a flavoured oil! A flavourless oil like groundnut, rapeseed or vegetable will be nicer as it won't steal the thunder of the fragrant ingredients!

For some people, the chili will seeds might be a bit too hot
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Old 09.01.2017, 01:41
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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All thai and Vietnamese curries and curry pastes make use of either the lemongrass being finely chopped or properly squished in pestle and mortar! To achieve the best result, I place the chili, Garlic and lemongrass in a mini blender and blitz until very finely chopped and mixed together! Make sure to only use the bottom part of the lemongrass - the softer part! The top part is more woody!

Coconut oil might be OK, though I suppose like olive oil, it is a flavoured oil! A flavourless oil like groundnut, rapeseed or vegetable will be nicer as it won't steal the thunder of the fragrant ingredients!

For some people, the chili will seeds might be a bit too hot
Very good idea to put those things in the miniblender! Thanks.

What do you mean by only the bottom part of the lemongrass and at the same time not the woody part. So not the green parts? The white parts yet not the bulky bit?

I only use olive-oil or coconut-oil. (And sesam-oil but not for frying/cooking).

A chilli's gotta be a chilli, no?
I'm hungry now and I'm the type who starts cooking at this hour - luckily I don't have chicken in the house.

Oh and I'd add some ginger as well. Fresh (=in the mini blender)
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:02
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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All thai and Vietnamese curries and curry pastes make use of either the lemongrass being finely chopped or properly squished in pestle and mortar! ... Coconut oil might be OK, though I suppose like olive oil, it is a flavoured oil!
I've done a few cooking classes in Thailand and they neither squash the lemongrass nor cut it finely; it's just peeled (if necessary) and cut diagonally into roughly 5cm lengths. They'll unravel a bit while cooking and you don't eat them. Leave them in or remove before serving - up to you. It keeps very well in the freezer, by the way.

I cook with coconut oil a lot. It's tasteless (unless you buy some very expensive virgin/unrefined variety which is best used as a moisturiser or something). I was taught to use thick coconut milk, leave the tin still overnight so it slightly separates, then scoop out and heat in a wok the thick cream from the top of the tin. At a very high heat the oil will separate and you cook your paste in that until it's pungent. With cheaper coconut milk (always check the % on the tin!), or if cooking a lot, then add coconut oil.

I have a mix of 70% olive oil and 30% coconut oil in my new deep fat fryer which does great fish&chips.

As an aside, and to the post above, I have two types of sesame oil (advantage of going to Taiwan once or twice a year) - one's for cooking and one for drizzling; the former being quite cheap. After cooking noodles, add some (drizzling) sesame oil whilst draining/shaking them in the sieve - it adds a a great flavour and aroma. I also use a drop or two (of either variety) in my rice cooker, added to the water.
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:06
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Very good idea to put those things in the miniblender! Thanks.

What do you mean by only the bottom part of the lemongrass and at the same time not the woody part. So not the green parts? The white parts yet not the bulky bit?

I only use olive-oil or coconut-oil. (And sesam-oil but not for frying/cooking).

A chilli's gotta be a chilli, no?
I'm hungry now and I'm the type who starts cooking at this hour - luckily I don't have chicken in the house.

Oh and I'd add some ginger as well. Fresh (=in the mini blender)
the base of the lemongrass is hard. just slice that off. then as you begin to thinly slice it, the lemongrass is soft. but as you begin to slice more and more and towards the thinner part, it begins to get harder, woody and more crunchy. you basically only want to use the soft bit, which is usually the lower half of the lemongrass.

definitely agree on chili but not all my mates want it too spicy.

definitely can add some ginger as well. I would though say that instead of putting it in the blender with the garlic, chilli and lemongrass, ginger is nice when grated as it releases its juices. I would just grate that into the marinade. this particular dish is a take on vietnamese chilli and lemongrass chicken and they don't use ginger in it. the only thing i changed was adding chicken stock as i like having a bit of sauce.
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:09
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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the base of the lemongrass is hard. just slice that off. then as you begin to thinly slice it, the lemongrass is soft. but as you begin to slice more and more and towards the thinner part, it begins to get harder, woody and more crunchy. you basically only want to use the soft bit, which is usually the lower half of the lemongrass.

definitely agree on chili but not all my mates want it too spicy.

definitely can add some ginger as well. I would though say that instead of putting it in the blender with the garlic, chilli and lemongrass, ginger is nice when grated as it releases its juices. I would just grate that into the marinade. this particular dish is a take on vietnamese chilli and lemongrass chicken and they don't use ginger in it. the only thing i changed was adding chicken stock as i like having a bit of sauce.
with regards to sesame oil, I love it. actually, I also use it to cook my rice. usually I leave a piece of ginger in the rice as it cooks...the smell of ginger and sesame infused rice is amazing. But a little while back, i read that you have to keep sesame oil in the fridge, as it actually goes off at room temp. so it basically has a lower shelf life. same goes for fish sauce. the longer it sits in your fridge, the lower its effect.
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:24
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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I've done a few cooking classes in Thailand and they neither squash the lemongrass nor cut it finely; it's just peeled (if necessary) and cut diagonally into roughly 5cm lengths. They'll unravel a bit while cooking and you don't eat them. Leave them in or remove before serving - up to you. It keeps very well in the freezer, by the way.
yep, that's how I use it. Thanks for freezing info.

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I cook with coconut oil a lot. It's tasteless (unless you buy some very expensive virgin/unrefined variety which is best used as a moisturiser or something). I was taught to use thick coconut milk, leave the tin still overnight so it slightly separates, then scoop out and heat in a wok the thick cream from the top of the tin. At a very high heat the oil will separate and you cook your paste in that until it's pungent. With cheaper coconut milk (always check the % on the tin!), or if cooking a lot, then add coconut oil.

I have a mix of 70% olive oil and 30% coconut oil in my new deep fat fryer which does great fish&chips.

As an aside, and to the post above, I have two types of sesame oil (advantage of going to Taiwan once or twice a year) - one's for cooking and one for drizzling; the former being quite cheap. After cooking noodles, add some (drizzling) sesame oil whilst draining/shaking them in the sieve - it adds a a great flavour and aroma. I also use a drop or two (of either variety) in my rice cooker, added to the water.
Great info, cheers. Never thought of mixing olive oil and coconut oil. Yep, I'm one of those who gets the bio/virgin/unrefined etc etc. type

The sesame oil goes everywhere (very good on noodles), into my salad sauce .... I'm a little addicted to the stuff now, I also roast black sesame seeds (no oil, just in the hot frying pan) and put it in a mill. Great on berad with butter too.
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:31
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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with regards to sesame oil, I love it. actually, I also use it to cook my rice. usually I leave a piece of ginger in the rice as it cooks...the smell of ginger and sesame infused rice is amazing. But a little while back, i read that you have to keep sesame oil in the fridge, as it actually goes off at room temp. so it basically has a lower shelf life. same goes for fish sauce. the longer it sits in your fridge, the lower its effect.
True, you need to keep it in the fridge but my sesame oil doesn't have a chance to get old The seeds I only roast in small portions as once you did I think it also loses taste quickly and it can mould.
The fishsauce I don't use often enough, I just realized mine has to go and I have to get new one Does it actually go bad or does it just lose taste?
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:37
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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True, you need to keep it in the fridge but my sesame oil doesn't have a chance to get old The seeds I only roast in small portions as once you did I think it also loses taste quickly and it can mould.
The fishsauce I don't use often enough, I just realized mine has to go and I have to get new one Does it actually go bad or does it just lose taste?
Basically it loses it intensity so you end up having you use more! With regards to going bad, I just follow the expiration date!
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Old 09.01.2017, 02:40
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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I've done a few cooking classes in Thailand and they neither squash the lemongrass nor cut it finely; it's just peeled (if necessary) and cut diagonally into roughly 5cm lengths. They'll unravel a bit while cooking and you don't eat them. Leave them in or remove before serving - up to you. It keeps very well in the freezer, by the way.

I cook with coconut oil a lot. It's tasteless (unless you buy some very expensive virgin/unrefined variety which is best used as a moisturiser or something). I was taught to use thick coconut milk, leave the tin still overnight so it slightly separates, then scoop out and heat in a wok the thick cream from the top of the tin. At a very high heat the oil will separate and you cook your paste in that until it's pungent. With cheaper coconut milk (always check the % on the tin!), or if cooking a lot, then add coconut oil.

I have a mix of 70% olive oil and 30% coconut oil in my new deep fat fryer which does great fish&chips.

As an aside, and to the post above, I have two types of sesame oil (advantage of going to Taiwan once or twice a year) - one's for cooking and one for drizzling; the former being quite cheap. After cooking noodles, add some (drizzling) sesame oil whilst draining/shaking them in the sieve - it adds a a great flavour and aroma. I also use a drop or two (of either variety) in my rice cooker, added to the water.
To make massaman curry, the lemongrass is dry charred, cut into pieces and then it's squished to a paste along with other ingredients and the spices in pestle and mortar!
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Old 09.01.2017, 11:32
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

Ah I see where you're coming from. Yes, most of the pastes have lemon grass added to it, with the entire paste made in a pestle and mortar. I, umm, buy my pastes ready made! They do that in Thailand as well, although their pastes are bought by weight from a huge bucket of the stuff in a market, not in a tub at an Asian supermarket in Basel. But it tastes pretty much the same to me
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Old 09.01.2017, 12:26
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Re: Post photos of what you cook and bake in Switzerland

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Ah I see where you're coming from. Yes, most of the pastes have lemon grass added to it, with the entire paste made in a pestle and mortar. I, umm, buy my pastes ready made! They do that in Thailand as well, although their pastes are bought by weight from a huge bucket of the stuff in a market, not in a tub at an Asian supermarket in Basel. But it tastes pretty much the same to me
I was actually going to add that in my reply that even thai people buy their paste and mix spices. But with me being from a completely different culture and liking what really goes into food, I learned how to make the whole thing from scratch from a Thai lady who was my next door neighbour. I did actually post the recipe on page 136. The dry charring of both the fresh ingredients and spices was very new to me. Very simple process that actually doesn't take long. To make a serving with 400ml of coconut milk, you only need max 2 tablespoons of the paste. So I would usually make enough paste for 3-4 serving. Keeps really well in the fridge, but I also do freeze it.
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