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  #161  
Old 22.10.2007, 20:52
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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prevailance of use in the world and complete resistance to being broken down environmentally, blood samples from polar bears contain teflon. As would yours and mine.
Well, that about sums it up in a nutshell for me, how many Polar Bears do you ever see cooking with a Teflon frying pan? Food for thought indeed....

Thanks for the confirmation, don't worry about the other ????'s I'll be a good little EFer and go Google it...

Cheers again,

Ros
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  #162  
Old 22.10.2007, 20:55
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I'm such a visual person. You just gave me the funniest image in my head ever. I see some polar bear out on the tundra standing in front of a stove (on two legs of course) cooking pancakes and flipping them, while two little polar bears sit at a table waiting to eat. Not all cartoony style either, but real like you'd see on the Discovery Channel.

Thanks.

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Well, that about sums it up in a nutshell for me, how many Polar Bears do you ever see cooking with a Teflon frying pan? Food for thought indeed....

Thanks for the confirmation, don't worry about the other ????'s I'll be a good little EFer and go Google it...

Cheers again,

Ros
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  #163  
Old 22.10.2007, 21:13
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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I'm such a visual person. You just gave me the funniest image in my head ever. I see some polar bear out on the tundra standing in front of a stove (on two legs of course) cooking pancakes and flipping them, while two little polar bears sit at a table waiting to eat. Not all cartoony style either, but real like you'd see on the Discovery Channel.
Now you've given me a similar image, but this time it is cartoony, and the polar bear is wearing sunglasses and looking cooool

Maybe an old advert I've seen somewhere?

Fox's Glacier Mints anyone?

http://www.foxs.co.uk/foxsrange.php
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  #164  
Old 22.10.2007, 21:21
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Do some people see a wider colour spectrum than others ?
Is this a trick question If not then I don't see why they shouldn't see a wider colour spectrum, I used to be in Audiology and know that some people can distinguish better and may have wider than normal auditory ranges. I would just test out of curiosity to see how high in Hz they could go. So if people can be colour-blind then they must have a wider than normal colour range. I, myself, am very colour sensitive!
Then again, is the increased sensitivity due to better eye apparatus- rods,cones etc or is it due to the brain's increased ability to discriminate? Perception can be culturally trained. A musician is generally better able to distinguish sound, so it must be that an artist is better able to discriminate colour. To me the ability to discriminate is probably as important as the range. Not seeing Auras are you?
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  #165  
Old 22.10.2007, 21:48
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I could imagine differing sensitivity to colours, but a wider colour range would mean a new chromophore/receptor in the eye and if you had it, I wouldn't tell anyone or the Man from the guvvernmint would come and take you off for testing...

Regarding tin foil, don't put it contact with very salty food as it can cause it break down and you don't want additional aluminium in your food.
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  #166  
Old 22.10.2007, 21:58
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Re: Ask a Scientist

There are numerous studies of perception of color in art. I went ot a great exhibition at the tate this summer on Hockney on Turner there was a side exhibition of hands on colour experiments, it showed that there is a lot of science in art and many cunning applications to trick the eye with depth perception etc.


Monet loses colur vision

http://entertainment.timesonline.co....cle1796314.ece
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  #167  
Old 22.10.2007, 21:58
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Re: Ask a Scientist

the answer is : 42

If somebody has electronics/telecommunications questions I'll try to be helpful
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  #168  
Old 22.10.2007, 22:04
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Questions:

1) How many people that wanted to be a tree ever succeeded ?

dave
The nymph Daphne metamorphosed into a laurel tree as a means of escaping from Apollo

I know because... I had two girlfriends named Daphe
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  #169  
Old 22.10.2007, 22:07
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I'm basically with chemgoddess here.

I don't think memorizing for the sake of memorizing is useful at all.

But I do think that there are certain things that are so important that you should practice *using* them to the point where you end up memorize them. But the focus should be on the activity of using this knowledge and not on mechanically memorizing them. If you don't end up memorizing them after using them for a long time, they are probably not worth memorizing anyway.

For example, if you do enough exercises with trigonometry you will end remembering most identies (and it's even better if you remember how to derive all of them when needed in case you forget their exact form).

I think we are not far from most of us walking around with Google-enabled phones. So you memorize things only if it's overall more effective than looking it up in Google...

Viktor

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I'm talking science, Dave. And memorizing the periodic table will not doing anything to increase your knowledge of chemistry if you don't understand the fundamental principles and concepts.

But also, people learn differently and not all teaching methods works for everyone.
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  #170  
Old 23.10.2007, 03:08
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Was she a tree or a duck ? We need to be clear about this.

dave


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I know because... I had two girlfriends named Daphe
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  #171  
Old 23.10.2007, 11:38
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Was she a tree or a duck ? We need to be clear about this.

dave
Sorry Dave, I don't share your preferences in love partners
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  #172  
Old 23.10.2007, 11:52
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Re: Ask a Scientist

When we think about the visible spectrum, it's only a tiny portion of the light spectrum. It's possible that some people could see maybe an additional 5-7 nm on either end of the visible spectrum versus other people.

But also I'm not quite sure what you mean by your question. Do people see the entire visible spectrum better (like you could see more shades of orange than I can) or are some people able to see a tiny bit farther into the near UV then others?

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Do some people see a wider colour spectrum than others ?
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  #173  
Old 23.10.2007, 12:23
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Re: Ask a Scientist

I heard once that men and women had slightly different ratios of blue and green visual receptor cells in their eyes. This is readily apparent when people start comparing colours. Is it more blue or more green? Teal or turquoise?
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  #174  
Old 23.10.2007, 12:33
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Could it have to do with the fact that a significantly larger fraction (by orders of magnitude) of male population is (partially) color-blind?

I don't know how to post a vote, but we could check what percentage of EF males and females can see see the numbers in all the pictures in this article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daltonism

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I heard once that men and women had slightly different ratios of blue and green visual receptor cells in their eyes. This is readily apparent when people start comparing colours. Is it more blue or more green? Teal or turquoise?
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  #175  
Old 23.10.2007, 13:47
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Re: Ask a Scientist

why do i hear a crackling sound when standing under electricity lines. are the lines vibrating? why does electricity make a sound like that?
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  #176  
Old 23.10.2007, 13:59
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Power lines produce an audible sound or buzz because they are producing something called a corona discharge that is interacting with the surrounding air. The corona discharge is a side-effect of the electric field the power line generates by carrying electricity. The discharge can be greater, and the buzzing louder if there is increased moisture or pollutants in the air.

What is happening is that the air is being ionized in the presence of the electric field that is created by the current that is running through the power lines. Oxygen and Nitrogen both get ionized.

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why do i hear a crackling sound when standing under electricity lines. are the lines vibrating? why does electricity make a sound like that?
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  #177  
Old 23.10.2007, 15:14
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Do electric stimulus muscle toners really work ? I was watching an infomercial last night and pulsing spasms of the models buns was almost hypnotic...

They actually look quite painful in use, and I cant believe anyone using the device can read a book while twitching like a sealion that hugh has just battered.

Anyone going to own-up to having bought/used one with any success ?

dave


PS: Just for the record, no , I am not considering buying one.
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  #178  
Old 23.10.2007, 15:32
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Do electric stimulus muscle toners really work ? I was watching an infomercial last night and pulsing spasms of the models buns was almost hypnotic...

They actually look quite painful in use, and I cant believe anyone using the device can read a book while twitching like a sealion that hugh has just battered.

Anyone going to own-up to having bought/used one with any success ?

dave


PS: Just for the record, no , I am not considering buying one.
That depends on how you define working!!!

They do cause a muscle contraction and so therefore provide a training stimulus of sorts. The muscle contraction that occurs is involuntary and so not specific to any sports or day to day action so there is no specificity in the training which occurs. Therefore, these things will help you you to tone up but will not make you an athlete. Also they can only be used on certain muscles, eg. the work on the quads, but are very uncomfortable on the hamstrings!!!

Due to the fact that the stimulus is very localised, the muscle volume that contracts is quite small so the oxygen consumption and thus calorie expenditure is quite low. In terms of losing weight going for a walk will do you much better.

Most people that use them for any function use them in addition to normal training. Some athletes use them at quite high power to try to increase strength in conjunction with weight training. Some athletes also use them at low intensity for recovery.

Personally I think they may be of benefit if you just want to tone up, and are doing some other work also... Other then that stay away from them.

The jury is still out on these in terms of scientific research. There are studies which show increases in strength using these for training. But all these studies have only measured the strength in a very specific laboratory setting, and in the same way as the training occurred (i.e. of course it was going to increase, but in practical terms we don't know if anything happened).

I have been involved in a study where these were used to try to stimulate growth hormone production. There was no more growth hormone released with the electro stim then with normal training.... ....and I tell you, I have NEVER had muscle soreness like I had for 2 weeks after the electro stimulation.
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  #179  
Old 23.10.2007, 15:35
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Re: Ask a Scientist

Great answer. Aint this forum wonderful ?

dave

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That depends on how you define working!!!

They do cause a muscle contraction and so therefore provide a training stimulus of sorts. The muscle contraction that occurs is involuntary and so not specific to any sports or day to day action so there is no specificity in the training which occurs. Therefore, these things will help you you to tone up but will not make you an athlete. Also they can only be used on certain muscles, eg. the work on the quads, but are very uncomfortable on the hamstrings!!!

Due to the fact that the stimulus is very localised, the muscle volume that contracts is quite small so the oxygen consumption and thus calorie expenditure is quite low. In terms of losing weight going for a walk will do you much better.

Most people that use them for any function use them in addition to normal training. Some athletes use them at quite high power to try to increase strength in conjunction with weight training. Some athletes also use them at low intensity for recovery.

Personally I think they may be of benefit if you just want to tone up, and are doing some other work also... Other then that stay away from them.

The jury is still out on these in terms of scientific research. There are studies which show increases in strength using these for training. But all these studies have only measured the strength in a very specific laboratory setting, and in the same way as the training occurred (i.e. of course it was going to increase, but in practical terms we don't know if anything happened).

I have been involved in a study where these were used to try to stimulate growth hormone production. There was no more growth hormone released with the electro stim then with normal training.... ....and I tell you, I have NEVER had muscle soreness like I had for 2 weeks after the electro stimulation.
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  #180  
Old 23.10.2007, 16:54
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Re: Ask a Scientist

How can an adult get more Glucosamin and how it helps to the articulations ?
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