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Old 16.03.2016, 18:51
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Hello everybody!

Hi, I'm new to the forum. I've been browsing for the past year or so, so I decided to join up!

I'm currently undertaking my registration year before becoming a qualified pharmacist. I completed my degree at King's College London in the summer just gone.

The reason I'm signing up is after I'm qualified and have some more free time I am going to start to learn German. I currently have a girlfriend who is from and currently living in Bern, I'd like to have conversations with her friends and family in Swiss German rather than everyone having to peak English for my sake!

Anyway, I'm toying with the idea of learning German in Switzerland and taking some time away after I qualify. I was wondering if anyone had any experiences similar? I would probably have to get a temporary job to help support this whilst I'm there, any advice?

Also, looking ahead I am interested in finding information in what job opportunities are out there in CH longterm for someone like myself and my relevant education background. I'm not opposite to a change in career path, just interested in hearing other people's stories and any advice they could share!
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Old 16.03.2016, 20:24
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Re: Hello everybody!

Hi Whippy,
Welcome to EF. I'm a newbie like you.
When I was growing up in the UK, we had Mr Whippy vans come round in the summer months selling icecream. I doubt you came across one of those in London.
As a pharmacist, I imagine there are ways to use your training in some way in one of the many Swiss pharmaceutical companies. Are you still eligible for careers advice in the UK? Maybe they can help you with this.
Better to have a plan than go over to CH with no job/clear idea of what you want to do. Switzerland is a high-cost country, no mistake.
Perhaps some of the people here will be able to help you out.
Good luck with learning German, I'm in the same boat!
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  #3  
Old 16.03.2016, 20:45
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Re: Hello everybody!

Welcome
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Old 16.03.2016, 21:11
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Re: Hello everybody!

Welcome to the forum. The problem you'll have job-wise is language. If you want a temp job working as a waiter or in a shop/factory how are you going to manage without German? It's only the high level/specialist jobs where English only is possible.

Looking further ahead on the jobs front two things to consider.

1) You need to get your qualifications recognised by this organisation before you could practice as a pharmacist here.

You are a doctor, dentist, veterinarian, pharmacist or chiropractor and would like to work in Switzerland?

Contact:
Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH)
MEBEKO
CH-3003 Bern
T +41 31 322 94 83
www.bag.admin.ch
MEBEKO-Ausbildung@bag.admin.ch

And of course fluency in spoken and written German will be needed too.

2) The Swiss recently voted to curb immigration from the EU. At the moment the proposal is for a safeguard clause whereby the Swiss government can impose a quota limit on EU nationals if they feel too many people are coming here. This is supposed to come into effect in Feb next year so hopping over and getting temp work may not be possible. Even getting work later on as a pharmacist may not be possible; I don't know what the demand is like for pharmacists here.

http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/swiss-ag...ramme/42000888
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Old 03.04.2016, 19:40
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Re: Hello everybody!

If your qualifications are in pharma you may want to consider looking in Basel than Bern. Basel is the pharma capital around here.

And for learning German.. in Bern.. stay away from the dialects!! I started German for 10 years in Frankfurt and moving to Switzerland I understand nothing of the swiss dialect!!
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Old 03.04.2016, 21:52
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Re: Hello everybody!

Welcome and enjoy.
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Old 02.05.2016, 19:31
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Re: Hello everybody!

Hi Whippy,

I think I am facing almost the same situation as you. My BF is in Swiss and I am at Singapore. I fly there every Dec to celebrate christmas with him and his family and he would come often to Singapore to stay with me. I am now learning german in Singapore and hope that I could learn german up to an approve standard to find jobs in Swiss next year. Before, when I am there, my BF help me to connect with job agencies to find job but because of the lack of german language, agencies say they couldn't help me. It is really sad to leave such a beautiful country and also the one I love.. If I have enough money to survive there, I would learn german over there. I not sure what to advise you but just start learning german.

Good Luck!
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Old 02.05.2016, 20:30
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Re: Hello everybody!

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Hi Whippy,

I think I am facing almost the same situation as you. My BF is in Swiss and I am at Singapore. I fly there every Dec to celebrate christmas with him and his family and he would come often to Singapore to stay with me. I am now learning german in Singapore and hope that I could learn german up to an approve standard to find jobs in Swiss next year. Before, when I am there, my BF help me to connect with job agencies to find job but because of the lack of german language, agencies say they couldn't help me. It is really sad to leave such a beautiful country and also the one I love.. If I have enough money to survive there, I would learn german over there. I not sure what to advise you but just start learning german.

Good Luck!
Welcome to the forum.

Unfortunately agencies are a waste of your time as they can do nothing for the hiring of non-EU nationals and they were simply using the language as an excuse. Any non-EU hiring application has to be done by a potential employer and they have to prove they can't find a Swiss/EU national who could do the job. The criteria is outlined here:

https://www.sem.admin.ch/sem/en/home/themen/arbeit/nicht-eu_efta-angehoerige/grundlagen_zur_arbeitsmarktzulassung.html

A university degree and several years of experience in your chosen field would be needed to even be considered.

Obviously speaking German will help, but it's the skills/experience you can bring to the workplace that will, or will not, make you desirable to Swiss employers.

Whippy's situation is different to yours as he/she is an EU national so has no restrictions on trying to find a job here.
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Old 03.05.2016, 00:17
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Re: Hello everybody!

Or find a connection. You might get lucky.
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Old 03.05.2016, 10:32
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Re: Hello everybody!

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Welcome to the forum.

Unfortunately agencies are a waste of your time as they can do nothing for the hiring of non-EU nationals and they were simply using the language as an excuse. Any non-EU hiring application has to be done by a potential employer and they have to prove they can't find a Swiss/EU national who could do the job. The criteria is outlined here:

https://www.sem.admin.ch/sem/en/home/themen/arbeit/nicht-eu_efta-angehoerige/grundlagen_zur_arbeitsmarktzulassung.html

A university degree and several years of experience in your chosen field would be needed to even be considered.

Obviously speaking German will help, but it's the skills/experience you can bring to the workplace that will, or will not, make you desirable to Swiss employers.

Whippy's situation is different to yours as he/she is an EU national so has no restrictions on trying to find a job here.
I see... now I know the agencies ExcusE.. but nothing is impossible so i will keep trying.
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Old 03.05.2016, 11:47
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Re: Hello everybody!

Nope, it's difficult as a non-EU national, but certainly not impossible. It all depends on what you can bring to the job.

Of course another option is to get married to your boyfriend. You'd then get a family reunification permit which effectively makes you the same as a Swiss/EU national when it comes to hiring purposes so those jobs like shop assistant would be available to try for too. Downside is that if you divorce further down the line then your permit status is thrown up in the air and you might have to leave Switzerland as you'd no longer have the right to live/work here unless your employer can go through the non-EU hiring process to keep you or there are other special circumstances which would allow you to apply for a permit like being the mother of a Swiss child and you're the primary caregiver.
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Old 04.05.2016, 13:22
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Re: Hello everybody!

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Nope, it's difficult as a non-EU national, but certainly not impossible. It all depends on what you can bring to the job.

Of course another option is to get married to your boyfriend. You'd then get a family reunification permit which effectively makes you the same as a Swiss/EU national when it comes to hiring purposes so those jobs like shop assistant would be available to try for too. Downside is that if you divorce further down the line then your permit status is thrown up in the air and you might have to leave Switzerland as you'd no longer have the right to live/work here unless your employer can go through the non-EU hiring process to keep you or there are other special circumstances which would allow you to apply for a permit like being the mother of a Swiss child and you're the primary caregiver.
Yes.. i know .. thank you
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