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  #21  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:21
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Of course, American English gives you gaas maask.
Guilty as charged and I am not even American...stoopid American sitcoms
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  #22  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:24
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Not wrong as such, but there's a huge amount of correct English that never gets taught. Accents are an entirely different kettle of fish. For example_

Gasmask. The first syllable is usually pronounced with a short "a", but seldom, if ever, as "ar". The second syllable may be short "a" or "ar". The educated southern English pronunciation would be:

Gas marsk.

Of course, American English gives you gaas maask.
Gas maarrsk daarrling......... if you're Craig Revel Horwood
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  #23  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:25
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Guilty as charged and I am not even American...stoopid American sitcoms
our cultural imperialism has all but guaranteed that english, as the world knows it, is and will continue to be american english. how's that for an idear?

i would note that the aussies are the guiltiest of offenders when it comes to the added -r. where are you from? "ozstralier!"
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  #24  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:33
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Ok this is a question for the native English speakers...When I moved to the Netherlands I noticed that a lot of Dutch people said "Idear" instead of "idea" (with no R at the end). Now I find the same thing even in some British folk...is evertyhing I learnt about English wrong?
Another thing is "what" and "when", some people pronounce the H in the middle (like the "ch" sound in German)...is it normal? It sounds terrible

Thanks Mud :P
I'm not sure about the Dutch connection, but at least in the US, the 'idear' slip can place the speaker to Ohio and Western PA fairly quickly, especially in conjunction with other particular linguistic tics, e.g. saying 'please' instead of 'excuse me' or 'draw-l-ers' instead of 'drawers'.

It's unlikely the Dutch were taking English elocution lessons from an Ohioan, so it could be just a bit of their native language bubbling up from below.
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  #25  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:39
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

Well I got all these "peculiarities" at first from my Statistics proffesor, who said idear instead of idea and gyro instear of zero...God I hated that class
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Old 23.08.2011, 14:47
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Well I got all these "peculiarities" at first from my Statistics proffesor, who said idear instead of idea and gyro instear of zero...God I hated that class
"Angela" sounds much better than "Angelar"! Did he call you that?
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Old 23.08.2011, 14:49
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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"Angela" sounds much better than "Angelar"! Did he call you that?
Or are you Angela like Frau Merkel?
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  #28  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:51
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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It's unlikely the Dutch were taking English elocution lessons from an Ohioan, so it could be just a bit of their native language bubbling up from below.
Well, you may be on to something there. When I was growing up and learning Dinglish the sitcom 'Family ties' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_Ties) was a big hit on TV. This series plays in Columbus, Ohio.

I also watched a lot of 'married with children'

How deranged am I that I remember that a sitcom from 20 yrs ago played in this-and-that city. Must get a life
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  #29  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:52
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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The educated southern English pronunciation would be:

Gas marsk.
Ah, you see. That's becasue southerners are daft.

In the north we have a short 'a' for both.

Guess which version is better when screaming "Get the gas masks!"
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  #30  
Old 23.08.2011, 14:57
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Ah, you see. That's becasue southerners are daft.

In the north we have a short 'a' for both.

Guess which version is better when screaming "Get the gas masks!"

Steady on Northern Monkey At least us Southerners can spell "because".
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  #31  
Old 23.08.2011, 15:02
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Or are you Angela like Frau Merkel?
NEIN! My name is Angela (g sounding like ch in German) it is a Spanish name after all, thanks to porshe everyone calls me angie though, I love it
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  #32  
Old 23.08.2011, 15:13
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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Ah, you see. That's becasue southerners are daft.

In the north we have a short 'a' for both.

Guess which version is better when screaming "Get the gas masks!"
You're both wrong, it' s a long "a" for both.
Unfortunately, this resulted in a disproportionately higher number of soldiers from the Gloucester regiment falling victim to the effects of mustard gas in WWI.
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  #33  
Old 23.08.2011, 15:15
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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You're both wrong, it' s a long "a" for both.
Unfortunately, this resulted in a disproportionately higher number of soldiers from the Gloucester regiment falling victim to the effects of mustard gas in WWI.
gee PaddyG thanks for confusing me even further -_-
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  #34  
Old 23.08.2011, 22:08
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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I have heard "idear" more from Americans than anybody else.
You must have met a lot of Americans from the upper Midwest - northern Ohio and Michigan, places like that or perhaps the northeast. Those are the places I remember friends who put that spare "r" were from.

I recall a particular Michigander gal I was friends with who had "wehrshing" day on Saturday to "wehrsh" her clothes. My other friends and I tend to "wahsh" rather than "wehrsh" things.

Someone else I knew called a coworker "Donner" rather than "Donna" - this gentleman was from Massachusetts. I always thought it interesting that they take the r from "car" (and similar words) only to stick it on others which contain no r in their spelling.


Then again, I've lived in places in the US where a creek is pronounced crick, roof is ruff, cement is c'ment, and peecahn (pecan) is p'cahn while elsewhere it is peecayn.

It will be interesting to see as the years pass what pronunciations I retain and what becomes flavored with the dialects and accents (both English and otherwise) I am hearing here now.
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Old 23.08.2011, 22:22
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

Don't even start on the Aussies
I was telling my brother in Cairns how hot it was here in Lausanne, and he told me I should buy an 'eggnishner'
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  #36  
Old 23.08.2011, 22:26
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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'eggnishner'


This?
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Old 23.08.2011, 22:30
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

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I'm not sure about the Dutch connection, but at least in the US, the 'idear' slip can place the speaker to Ohio and Western PA fairly quickly, especially in conjunction with other particular linguistic tics, e.g. saying 'please' instead of 'excuse me' or 'draw-l-ers' instead of 'drawers'.

It's unlikely the Dutch were taking English elocution lessons from an Ohioan, so it could be just a bit of their native language bubbling up from below.
Oh so true, but I do believe it's precisely because of the high amount of Dutch and German immigration in the 19th century.
As a kid I used to believe that "boughten" and "outen" and "schneikikite" (süssigkeiten) were proper English words
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Old 24.01.2015, 18:55
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Re: IDEAR? Whhat? Whhen?

Thank you my dear Engine, I wrote this before I learned of the other possible origin
The internet is.... tiny !
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