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  #21  
Old 24.09.2015, 17:20
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

It really depends on the context.

In Belgium, "sans papier" is basically a "nicer" way to describe an illegal immigrant (i.e. a foreigner who has no valid permit(s) to live nor work in the country where he is residing), simple as that.

It doesn't sound nice but in the end it is what it is.

But for your translation purpose "undocumented immigrant" might be good.
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  #22  
Old 24.09.2015, 17:28
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

"Undocumented immigrant" is the currently preferred term in the US.

Assuming the article is about people from elsewhere who currently live in Switzerland (or France, or wherever it refers to), not about Swiss (or French, etc) people who currently live elsewhere, I see no particular reason to change it from "immigrant" to "emigrant" or "migrant". You can if you want, of course, but I'd stick with the more commonly used term.
http://www.googlefight.com/%22undocu...migrant%22.php
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  #23  
Old 24.09.2015, 18:15
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

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why "migrant" ?
a sans papier is someone with documents, it does not mean he is a foreigner or passing through...
Hmm, I thought about this after my original post. There are many reasons why a native might chose not to have (or produce) documents - being on the run from the law, bankruptcy, alimony payments etc. Would those people be included in the term? I'm thinking especially where you might describe casual labourers - eg "10% of the workforce on this site were sans papiers" - they may or may not be migrants.
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Old 24.09.2015, 19:55
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

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I think in English for this sort of contect, they use the "sans papiers" expression.... I am not sure there is a common-use equivalent.

This link will give you an indication of how it is used in english.
https://cispmberlin.wordpress.com/

In English you can also translate it directly as 'migrant without papers'. Or 'Undocumented Migrant'.

http://picum.org/en/our-work/who-are...nted-migrants/
Spot on 'sans papiers'
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Old 24.09.2015, 20:20
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

In France, sans papiers in this context actually means foreigners without residence permit. When we say "il a eu ses papiers", it means "he got granted residence permit". When it reads "il n'a pas ses papiers" about a foreigner, it means "he has no legal residence/work permit".

One can also use a similar expression when one has no documentation when travelling: voyager sans (ses) papiers or ne pas avoir ses papiers. This would be different context situations.

Some immigrants come in both categories, others only in the first. In the second category, it can be anybody who lost or forgot his ID before leaving home.

I am reluctant to tell people what to say in English because it is a foreign language to me, but I vote for the translation "illegal immigrant". it's the one avoiding the ambiguity explained above.
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  #26  
Old 24.09.2015, 21:54
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

http://www.sans-papiers.ch/index.php?id=90&L=3
On this website, you can click your way through the languages, at least on some of the pages.
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  #27  
Old 24.09.2015, 22:11
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Re: How to say 'sans papiers' in English?

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"Undocumented immigrant" is the currently preferred term in the US.

Assuming the article is about people from elsewhere who currently live in Switzerland (or France, or wherever it refers to), not about Swiss (or French, etc) people who currently live elsewhere, I see no particular reason to change it from "immigrant" to "emigrant" or "migrant". You can if you want, of course, but I'd stick with the more commonly used term.
http://www.googlefight.com/%22undocu...migrant%22.php
This was what I went with in the end. In the context of the paper I was translating this was definitely the best option I could find.
I had considered leaving it as 'sans-papiers' initially but the way we would use this in English just didn't fit with the context of the text I had to translate.
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