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Old 30.04.2015, 22:29
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Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

We've been given a lovely rose climber "Pierre de Ronsard" as a present today. We are moving house exactly in a year's time, what should we do with it? Planting it might be a nightmare to retrieve next year. Would it survive in a large pot?


Any tips?
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Old 30.04.2015, 22:30
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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We've been given a lovely rose climber "Pierre de Ronsard" as a present today. We are moving house exactly in a year's time, what should we do with it? Planting it might be a nightmare to retrieve next year. Would it survive in a large pot?


Any tips?


Forgot to say it is already over 1 m high.
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Old 30.04.2015, 22:54
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

It should be fine in a large pot. In your shoes I'd prune it right back in the autumn and it should overwinter without any problems.
Put a decent sized trellis or obelisk in the pot to give it some support over the summer.
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Old 30.04.2015, 23:25
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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We've been given a lovely rose climber "Pierre de Ronsard" as a present today. We are moving house exactly in a year's time, what should we do with it? Planting it might be a nightmare to retrieve next year. Would it survive in a large pot?


Any tips?
In a similar situation, have a rambling rose bought at the same time as one we gave as a gift to MIL in memory of a special trip to Devon a few years ago. She has since died an OH doesn't want to leave ours behind when we move back to the UK. Hers was left in the garden when the house was sold.... so long ripped up.

It's survived so far, just don't forget to water it, keep it well pruned, and above all protect the pot (and therefore the rootball) during the winter!
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Old 01.05.2015, 16:13
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

Lucky you, Pierre de Ronsard is a lovely rose. I was given one and it did so well in my East Leicestershire garden- but did not survive the move here (unlike other David Austin roses that did). Do you know where it was bought? I would ask the suppliers for advice. Personally I would plant it in a large pot- but make sure you mix soil and not use only compost. Is it a bare root plant or in a pot?
The rose expert for Romandie is not far from you- why not go and ask him. Alain Tschanz has tons of experience and is very friendly.

http://www.rosiers.ch/

Last edited by Odile; 01.05.2015 at 17:05.
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Old 02.05.2015, 18:19
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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It should be fine in a large pot. In your shoes I'd prune it right back in the autumn and it should overwinter without any problems.
Put a decent sized trellis or obelisk in the pot to give it some support over the summer.




For obelisk and trellis, in the U.K. we used Agriframes.co.uk Could you recommend something similar over here? Cheers.
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Old 03.05.2015, 00:19
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

Might be cheaper and better choice to get from the UK. These guys are really good and will ship- but we normally order than bring in the car when we visit.

http://www.harrodhorticultural.com/g...s-tcid105.html
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Old 03.05.2015, 00:40
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

If the rose is going to be planted in the ground at some point reasonably soon (you say next year?), then you really don't need to spend vast amount on fancy obelisks or trellising.
For the moment keeep the rose pruned back, use a couple of those metal tomato spirals or a basic extendable x-style trellis to support the runners you do want to encourage, above all protect the root ball from drying out and especially from frost next winter.
Then enjoy planting it properly next Spring in a spot you can enjoy it!!
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Old 03.05.2015, 11:33
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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For obelisk and trellis, in the U.K. we used Agriframes.co.uk Could you recommend something similar over here? Cheers.
I got mine from Landi. I don't know of anything like the company you mention but then I've never actually looked for one.

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If the rose is going to be planted in the ground at some point reasonably soon (you say next year?), then you really don't need to spend vast amount on fancy obelisks or trellising.
For the moment keeep the rose pruned back, use a couple of those metal tomato spirals or a basic extendable x-style trellis to support the runners you do want to encourage, above all protect the root ball from drying out and especially from frost next winter.
Then enjoy planting it properly next Spring in a spot you can enjoy it!!
Agreed Anjela. No point in bothering with fancy trellis and stuff for a temporary measure. A bamboo teepee or basic trellis will do the job just as well as a temporary solution. Better to wait for the permanent location and getting something appropriate for the situation.

I've never bothered protecting pots with roses from frost as they're pretty hardy and we're not at an altitude where we get a lot of frost and I've not lost one yet ( all sentimental roses) but it's probably a good idea for a Taveau to do as it's the first year.
Not allowing the root ball to dry out is the most important thing in my opinion.

Last edited by Belgianmum; 04.05.2015 at 14:17.
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Old 03.05.2015, 11:56
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

There are ... roses and ... roses. Some are very hardy and some are not, some are prone to disease, and some not. Consulting a good rose growers pamphlet can really help here, and if you write to David Austen (or visit ... even better, just a stone's throw from Birmingham- the gardens in June are just mind blowing) - the website for Alain Tschanz in Romandie (is is the Swiss agent for David Austen btw) is really useful too, and again, a visit even better (above Morges).

I water my roses- but not sure about keeping the root ball watered if not in a pot- I keep seeing the most magnificent roses growing totally uncared for in very dry areas and derelict gardens- which makes me VERY envious!

My David Austen roses, transplanted from our UK garden have all done well- but have adapted by having much smaller flowers here than they did there - but just as beautiful. They are however planted against the house, but still got covered with 2mof snow this winter- bless them.
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Old 03.05.2015, 12:19
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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I water my roses- but not sure about keeping the root ball watered if not in a pot- .
It wouldn't be necessary to water a dry root ball only if the rose was in a pot.

It is possible to overwinter roses as a dry root ( my mother used to do it) but it's not something I would consider without specialist advice as there are a lot of factors to consider.
It's far easier to keep it in a pot but I lot of people forget that they need watering in winter too albeit less than in summer.
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Old 03.05.2015, 14:19
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Re: Odile and other gardeners to the rescue!

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Agreed Anjela. No point in bothering with fancy trellis and stuff for a temporary measure. A bamboo teepee or basic trellis will do the job just as well as a temporary solution. Better to wait for the permanent location and getting something appropriate for the situation.

I've never bothered protecting pots with roses from frost as they're pretty hardy and we're not at an altitude where we get a lot of frost and I've not lost one yet ( all sentimental roses) but it's probably a good idea for a Taveau to do as it's the first year.
Not allowing the root ball to dry out is the most important thing in my opinion.
I think Taveau's in a flat at the moment, if he's keeping the rose pot on a balcony then at the very least it might protecting from from below!
I lost several hardy plants one year because I'd carefully wrapped the sides (newspaper or bubble-wrap is great for that), but completely forgot about the base, so the pot was exposed to cold concrete that was freezing due to the cold wind (Bise).
Depending on exactly where he is in Geneva (I know he's in one of the villages), then it can get very cold, and the ground frosts severe.

You're right about the root ball not drying out though, especially in the Spring when it starts to warm up again and the new growth starts.
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