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Old 11.04.2010, 14:09
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Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Spring is here and I have started a little balcony garden! My tulips didn't do well - insufficient draining and bulbs got mushy. But I'm pressing on and I want to try cherry tomatoes (colleague swears they are easy to grow), herbs, spring onions (just plant the bulb and it produces more leaves ) and more flowers...

But going back to the title. Worm composting!
http://earth911.com/news/2007/04/02/...ng-with-worms/

I heard that it's a great way to compost as there will be less smell than normal compost, and if you don't overfeed the worms, flies won't really breed in there. And also that you can just place the tub of compost/worms under your sink, perfect for apartment living! I don't know how squirmish I will be with the worms, but I'm thinking of giving it a shot....

Does anyone here compost with worms? I'm wondering if you have any problems with fruit flies in the summer (I haaate them), and if it really doesn't smell and can be placed under my kitchen sink. Also, I'm wondering where to get the suitable worms... (i've already found out how to construct a bin http://www.yougrowgirl.com/garden/vermicomposting.php)

Any advice would be much appreciated!
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Old 11.04.2010, 14:37
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Hi Ctan,

I've recently sold a worm farm back home. They are great.. we had the large outdoor variety that got through the organic waste of a family of 4.. about 1 to 1.5 plastic shopping bags worth a week. The run off, worm-wee if you will, was mostly feed to outdoor plants or tipped into a nearby large compost bin. The trailings were used for potting and excess again tipped into large compost bins. The outcome of this was happy plants and pot plants. Happy compost bin.. it turned into, you guessed it, a worm farm.. the eggs from the farm hatched. In fact all the compost bins became wormfarms.

Now, fruit flies are a complete nuisance but as you have pointed out if the farm is getting feed correct amounts then the fruit flies cannot compete with the worms. Basically, the worm farm has to be fully established. Otherwise you can try fine netting over the holes of the farm but... those fruit flies are hard to keep out of places they want to be.

For the size of the farm in the links you provided, I expect it to get through no more than.. 1 to 2 liters of material a week. Certainly no oranges or similar citrus skins. Also consider a multiple tier farm, made from 2 or more levels to help with the emptying of the farms end product, the tailings.

CK
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Old 11.04.2010, 14:48
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Hi CheesyKiwi,

Thanks for the reply! It's so nice that posts here get read so often and by the right people
I don't need a huge farm as I only have a few pots of plants. In my household, there's only me and my 2 birds, but I'm vegetarian so most of my waste are veg/fruit (don't really produce 1-2 liters a week though).
The 2 tier farm sounds like a good idea. Otherwise I would have to hand-rake through the worms to get at the tailings right? Initially the thought of worms in my kitchen was gross, but I'm starting to like the idea
If anyone knows of any stores that sell the right worms or the farm tub thingie, do let me know! And once my worms reproduce, I'd be happy to share



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Hi Ctan,

I've recently sold a worm farm back home. They are great.. we had the large outdoor variety that got through the organic waste of a family of 4.. about 1 to 1.5 plastic shopping bags worth a week. The run off, worm-wee if you will, was mostly feed to outdoor plants or tipped into a nearby large compost bin. The trailings were used for potting and excess again tipped into large compost bins. The outcome of this was happy plants and pot plants. Happy compost bin.. it turned into, you guessed it, a worm farm.. the eggs from the farm hatched. In fact all the compost bins became wormfarms.

Now, fruit flies are a complete nuisance but as you have pointed out if the farm is getting feed correct amounts then the fruit flies cannot compete with the worms. Basically, the worm farm has to be fully established. Otherwise you can try fine netting over the holes of the farm but... those fruit flies are hard to keep out of places they want to be.

For the size of the farm in the links you provided, I expect it to get through no more than.. 1 to 2 liters of material a week. Certainly no oranges or similar citrus skins. Also consider a multiple tier farm, made from 2 or more levels to help with the emptying of the farms end product, the tailings.

CK
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Old 11.04.2010, 16:53
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Oh hey I found a relevant thread on EF: Food waste
I searched for this so many times and didn't find it until i did a google search.
am now trying to search for the worms on biogarten.ch - their kit is awfully expensive though guess i'll need an ikea trip to see what containers they have!
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Old 08.08.2010, 03:48
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Helo everyone, I've been vermicomposting with a homemade worm bin for a couple of months. those commercial ones are just too expensive for me. My worm bin is doing well as long as I take care of my worms properly. I made it by following instructions from an article that I saw online. Just had some troubles at first when I transferred my worms to the bin. They try to escape! It takes a week or two before they get settled and realize that it's their new 'home'. If this happens to you in the first couple of weeks, it's completely normal. Just make sure to shine a light and open the bin slightly - this will make the worms want to go down in the dirt so they don't try to escape.

Here's a couple of articles that are helpful
Guides in Raising Red Worms
Going for the Best Homemade Compost Bin

Let me know how your bins go! If you have some questions, I would be more than glad to answer them
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Old 15.03.2011, 14:06
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

BUMP.

Is there anyone living in proximity to Geneva that has a bountiful supply of red worms that I could come collect or buy from them? Or perhaps there's someone kind enough to post it as a friendly donation for a couple trying to pursue a greener lifestyle?

I checked out the site suggested in this thread (http://www.biogarten.ch/) but the price comes out to 46.40CHF for 250g of worms - a bit more than I'd like to be spending.

Thanks in advance for any help/tips!
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Old 16.03.2011, 22:52
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

I started my worm farm in fall 2008. The reason wa spretty simple. A year and a half before I had moved out of the generous house and an even more generous garden, both of which are still financed by me but lived in by my ex. There I had had a compost pile about as big as the average Swiss living room.

After removal, I had to get used to a tiny apartment, no garden, let alone a compost heap. Even under these very different circumstances, I managed to keep my production of non-recyclable garbage in the range of about one litre (1 quart) per week. No kidding. Very selective shopping can do a huge lot!

However, as if that were not a result most people do not even dare dream of, I thought I could do even better by composting my organic kitchen waste.

I bought a plastic storage box, about 60 cm (L) x 37 cm (W) x 30 cm (H), Migros, around ten francs. I drilled 15 holes in the bottom, about 6 mm diam. each -- very easy in relatively soft plastic: I used the awl of an ordinary Swiss Army knife.

I covered the bottom of the box with one sheet of newspaper, then poured some poor-quality pottign soil from Jumbon on it, about 8 cm deep. Meanwhile, the worms, red wigglers, scientifically known as Eusenia foetida, were on their way from Andermatt Biogarten mentioned by other posters. Yes, the expensive ones, but worth every single penny: Absolutely professional packaging capable of surviving a major hurricane, worms traveling in their very own first-class compost soil etc..

The worm farm box had no lid, just a piece of garbage bag cut big enough to be laid over the edges of the box, about 22 cm above the surface of the soil. That meant a lot of air inside the box, enough to take up much evaporation from the soil. So I had to sprinkle water about twice a week to prevent the soil from drying out.

When the water input was too big (sprinkling plus somewhat watery waste), I soon noticed a dark brown liquid oozing through the holes, called "worm tea," as my research on the 'Net revealed.

At first I took it as a nuisance, then I learned that some plant whisperers would give an arm and leg for a thimbleful of it. So I again slaughtered my piggy bank and bought a plastic shoe tray whose size just about covered the foot print of the box, which put me back another staggering six francs or so.

After about half a year it dawned on me that I might try to cover the soil directly, without a lot of air. I cut a new piece of garbage bag and perforated it with the very same Swiss Army knife awl. I didn't count the holes, bit I guess I made more than 300 of them, just kind of a stabbing spree on an old rug to prevent the floor from getting ruined.

That plastic sheet was cut to measure, covering the soil wall to wall. Low and behold, ever since that change I have had to sprinkle water only on very rare occasions, say twice times a year, for instance before going on vacation for three and a half weeks. The micro-climate below the plastic seems to be ideal. The worms say they are all happy.

The box is in the laundry room, which is very small and has no windows, just a ventilator. However, smell is not an issue at all as long as I do not feed certain smelly stuff such as white raddish peel, celeriac, fennel, grapefruit peel, leek, onion skins and the like.

I never saw fruit flies, but I had two invasions by sciaridae, the tiny gnats that sometimes come with store-bought pot plants and can be a nuisance. However, also there the plasic sheet came in handy. I lifted it to make all the gnats take off, then I put it back to completely cover the soil and sprayed a bit of an "organic" insecticide on the walls, the worms being protected underneath the plastic sheet. I had to do that only twice in two years.

As for freeloaders -- after about a year, I observed lots of springtails. Pot plant buffs know that they do no harm, and there is no problem with them in the worm box either.

By the way, the worms never ever try to escape, although technically they could. They seem to feel too fine in the box to consider any attempt.

Result: The worms enabled me to halve my non-recyclable waste, which means I'm down to one litre every other week now. Anyone out there to beat that?

Of course, when my AOH is here, things look a bit different. The A in AOH stands for "American," which implies she is, although pretty environmental-minded, much more wasteful than I. The worms rejoice when she is here, which is about five months a year. I haven't told them yet that she's flying in again right before Easter, otherwise they'd start a big whoopee already now.

In 28 months, the level of the soil has raised by about 7 cm. During that time, I fed the worms about 60 litres of my own kitchen waste. Assuming my AOH added roughly the same amount, that makes a total of 120 liters, which were converted into about 15 litres of top notch potting soil -- still too little to open a business over it, but a nice and clean thing.

My AOH goes bonkers over the whoile thing. Sometimes she calls her friends or relatives in the USA just to tell them, "Now he's again going to baby his worms."
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Old 20.03.2011, 23:27
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

I am also looking to start vermiposting in the Geneva area. Let me know if you have any luck finding worms at a reasonable price, or someone willing to help out in the spirit of Earthday.

Another link on how to do a homemade bin: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/200...sting-bin.html.

Cheers!
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Old 22.03.2011, 11:43
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Thanks for the useful info, Captain!

Have any worms to spare???
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Old 22.03.2011, 12:41
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

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Thanks for the useful info, Captain!

Have any worms to spare???
Sorry, I'm afraid not. A worm farm adjusts its population to the food supply and the amount of soil. If there is a surplus of food, those guys make babies like mad, if there is less, the older ones die of old age while love-making by the younger ones is cranked down. After a while the population always stabilizes at a balanced level.

Even for a small farm, you need several hundred worms to reach a stable population within a reasonable time without your waste just rotting away, producing mold spores, smell and other nasties. To produce enough new worms to make a new colony, I'd have to double the volume of my soil and the amount I feed to them.
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Old 28.03.2011, 14:14
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

May try foraging the local dechetterie at dusk. Anyone else is welcome to join (in Gland), otherwise I'll post my findings...
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Old 30.03.2011, 12:48
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

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May try foraging the local dechetterie at dusk. Anyone else is welcome to join (in Gland), otherwise I'll post my findings...
Failed. The compost is on top of concrete which might impede the wormies from coming up. Also, it may be that they're located deep, DEEP into the massive pile and that's not an area that I'm equipped/willing to venture into.

Sigh... how in the world will I get my free worms?!
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Old 30.03.2011, 16:09
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

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Failed. The compost is on top of concrete which might impede the wormies from coming up. Also, it may be that they're located deep, DEEP into the massive pile and that's not an area that I'm equipped/willing to venture into.

Sigh... how in the world will I get my free worms?!
My cousins wife does this at home, this is a great link/site for a basic set up and this cut and paste from the same site gives a good tip for getting your own free red wigglers.



Step 4
Add your worms to the bedding. One way to gather redworms, is to put out a large piece of wet cardboard on your lawn or garden at night. The redworms live in the top 3 inches of organic material, and like to come up and feast on the wet cardboard! Lift up cardboard to gather the redworms. Or, if you wish to purchase worms, the Cooperative Extension office can give you names of suppliers in Whatcom County. An earthworm can consume about 1/2 of its weight each day. For example, if your food waste averages 1/2 lb. per day, you will need 1 lb. of worms or a 2:1 ratio. There are roughly 500 worms in one pound. If you start out with less than one pound, don't worry they multiply very quickly. Just adjust the amount that you feed them for your worm population.



http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/Easywormbin.htm

It's a great idea and my cousin has a wonderful vegi & flower garden.

Good luck and hope you can get started soonest.
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Old 30.03.2011, 16:26
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Seems a bit too-good-to-be-true, but I will indeed try this over the next couple of nights.

I just find it strange that you can throw down wet cardboard anywhere and red wigglers will appear the next morning. I'll try to encourage them a bit more by putting some food waste underneath (I've read they like coffee grinds and banana peels the best, fortunately that's what my mornings consist of!).

Will post my results...
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Old 31.03.2011, 08:56
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Yet another failure.

Last night at dusk I sprinkled coffee grinds and some other organic waste on top of some leaf litter at the edge of the "woods" (for lack of a better word, just a couple trees really), wet it, put some torn newspaper on top, wet that, put some torn cardboard on top of that, wet it and then wet the sh1te out of everything.

I wake up at sunrise today expecting at least a few little wigglers - nothing. Just some snails and slugs. great.
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Old 31.03.2011, 16:54
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Well, my many followers, I've finally succumbed to my impatience and desperation and found an online retailer from the UK who ships to Europe for a reasonable price.

Here is the link, and there are many different shipment sizes according to your preferences. The prices work out to be remarkably cheaper than buying worms at a local retailer in Switzerland. I'm going to buy either 250g (~15.50CHF incl. shipping) or 500g (~25CHF incl. shipping). As a reminder, Andermatt Biogarten sells 250g for 35CHF not including shipping!

Hope this helps some other people!
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Old 27.05.2011, 12:40
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Hi folks,

I've recently built a small (1m*2m) veg garden on my terrace and want to add some worms to help keep the soil healthy. Does anyone know if the "composting" worms (Kompostwürmer) would be suitable or do I need to try and find some Regenwürm (aka earthworms).

If it's the Regenwürm option does anyone know where I can buy them or do I need to go hunt some in the woods?

thanks
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Old 22.03.2012, 21:07
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Hi,

I am also looking for composting worms. Anyone have a few worms to spare in the Basel area?
We used to do this in San Diego - its great way to use up kitchen scraps in an apartment (our balcony is too small for a compost bin).
Also, any info on how they survive in winter?
Thanks!
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Old 22.03.2012, 21:30
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

Are these 'red worms' the same as the ones you find in a regular garden compost heap once it's cooled down a bit? And whats the advantage of a worm compost thing over just a normal compost bin?
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Old 22.03.2012, 21:40
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Re: Worm Composting/Vermiculture - has anyone tried this?

A normal compost bin needs to be pretty large for it to work well (get enough heat going to help break things down). A worm bin can be fairly small and the time it takes for worms to chow down on your kitchen scraps is really fast compared to decomposing in a compost bin. We live in an apartment, so the bin has to go on the balcony. We don't have space for a compost bin on our balcony.
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