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Old 24.08.2012, 14:53
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Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

I'm a language teacher, English/ Spanish and started applying online for jobs and just wanted to know if it would be possible to get a job and a work permit being non EU?
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Old 24.08.2012, 16:27
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

As you probably already know, a company must first try to fill positions with Swiss or EU citizens. Only after proving that there are no CH/EU candidates qualified and available will the authorities consider a permit for a non-EU citizen. So the question is: what skills do you have that no one else among the ca 500 million CH/EU citizens possess?

That's what you need to highlight, and that is where you need to look.

Good luck!
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Old 24.08.2012, 18:51
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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...
So the question is: what skills do you have that no one else among the ca 500 million CH/EU citizens possess?
...
True, but not all of it,

as it's those of the 500 million EUs able and willing to come to work in Switzerland and - in the given case - speak and teach both, Spanish and English.
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Old 24.08.2012, 18:57
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

spanish teaching won't get you too much work around here, english teaching could get you some- but there's an awful lot of english teachers here with work permits already...

i hate to be the bearer of bad news but very difficult (but nothing's impossible!)
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Old 29.08.2012, 22:35
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Unfortunately, I have to agree with Amaraya. I am also non-EU, but able to get a B working permit through my husband (eventually). It is hard enough for non-EU people to find work WITH a permit. Without one... you would either have to be extremely lucky, or know someone who is willing to work the system.

For a language teacher - very unlikely simply because so many people here speak English and/or Spanish so they aren't in short supply.

However, if you work for a company with an office here, then it might be a possibility to transfer here.
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Old 30.08.2012, 17:39
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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For a language teacher - very unlikely simply because so many people here speak English and/or Spanish so they aren't in short supply.
Actually Spanish teachers are in reasonably short supply if we are talking about qualified school teachers where both the state and private sectors have opportunities.
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Old 30.08.2012, 18:18
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Dear OP are you qualified as mentioned?
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Old 06.09.2012, 15:52
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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Actually Spanish teachers are in reasonably short supply if we are talking about qualified school teachers where both the state and private sectors have opportunities.
Hmmm... Geneva is around 600Km away from 47 million Spanish speaking people living in a country with financial difficulties.

I don't think there will be a problem getting a few Spanish teachers to move to Switzerland should it be needed. EU citizen = less paper work, less hassle.

I'm also quite sure there are a few Spanish University graduates available in this country to take up employment...

Just my two Euro cent
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Old 06.09.2012, 16:15
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Maybe it's teachers who are entitled to work in public schools who are in short supply.
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Old 06.09.2012, 16:22
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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Maybe it's teachers who are entitled to work in public schools who are in short supply.
With EU "approved" teaching qualifications?

I doubt it, BUT don't think it's fair to give false hopes
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Old 03.08.2015, 11:17
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Hi -

I found this thread very helpful, so thanks to all for the colour already provided. Beyond this, I would really appreciate some helpful guidance on my particular issue.....

I have discussed an opportunity at a school here in CH which teaches languages and also de-mystifies the US education system for Swiss/EU students to align themselves - from a qualification standpoint - ahead of a potential move to study in the US.

Some key assumptions before my questions:
- I'm from the US
- I've a Bachelors and Masters from top ranked universities in the US
- I'm fluent in English and Spanish, and at school here to learn German
- I've 3 years+ teaching experience
- One way of distinguishing myself from the crowd is that I have US education system knowledge
- There appears to be some flexibility in the proposed contract offer that I would receive, e.g. part or full time
- I'm currently in CH on a tourist visa for 2 weeks now

Questions:
- Which permit am I best applying for, from available quota and likeliness of approval perspectives? e.g. L, B or International Training Agreement
- How long will it take realistically from start to permit-in-hand?
- Are there any quick wins to be had? e.g. set appointment with the local Immigration Dept to walk through my case etc.
- Will I need to leave CH at any point before receiving aforementioned permit?

Again, really appreciate all help offered....

THANKS!!
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Old 03.08.2015, 11:38
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Why are they going to give YOU a permit ? Plenty of people who speak English and Spanish already here, plenty of qualéified teachers too (and nonm qualified for that matter) as for the US education system, what has that got to do with the Swiss ?

(By the way, they weren't "key assumptions" but ratrher more "key facts"....) or is this part of the mystery of a US education system ?
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Old 03.08.2015, 12:26
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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Questions:
- Which permit am I best applying for, from available quota and likeliness of approval perspectives? e.g. L, B or International Training Agreement
- How long will it take realistically from start to permit-in-hand?
- Are there any quick wins to be had? e.g. set appointment with the local Immigration Dept to walk through my case etc.
- Will I need to leave CH at any point before receiving aforementioned permit?

Again, really appreciate all help offered....

THANKS!!
As a non-EU, you cannot apply for the permit, the entity who will have agreed to offer you employment does. As to what permit they will get for you, that depends on the details of your contract and the migration office.
For them to apply for a permit to begin with, they will have to prove to the migration office that they have looked for EU people to do the job, but you are still the best suited.

Once you are offered a job, a permit can take upto two months, and it has to be collected outside CH, not necessarily in your home country though.

If you walk into the immigration office while here as a tourist, be prepared for a very rude dismissal.

Last edited by Kosti; 03.08.2015 at 12:33. Reason: Wasnt clear if previous poster is EU or non-EU
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Old 03.08.2015, 14:35
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

So ... this is confusing as your profile says you're British. Still checking back through the posts for this username I suspect we're talking about your US girlfriend.

"I (UK citizen) moved to Zurich with my (US citizen) fiancé at the start of the year and plan A, now that we're here, is to get her a job while she's under the 3-month tourist thingy.

We do have a plan B (we're currently applying for a stay permit via family reunification) and failing that, a plan C (filing the Preparation for Marriage which gives her a 6-month stay permit); however, I really want to exhaust plan A first.

Like I say, I have read thru the thread and it seems to be more focused on the extent of the problem rather than offering up viable solutions. Since my fiancé is already here, she cannot tfr with a company and so the only option (besides us expediting the wedding) is to find a company prepared to sponsor her.

Academically, she has two bachelor degrees and a masters
Experience-wise, she has Private Banking experience
She's also fluent in English and Spanish"

work permit in CH for American citizens (page 3)

So frankly you already know what the answers will be.

As said, she can't apply for a permit, her potential new employer has to and must prove they can't find a Swiss/EU national who could do the job. The criteria is outlined here:

https://www.bfm.admin.ch/bfm/en/home...zulassung.html

Months to get permit approval so yes she will have to leave Switzerland and head back to the States. She'll need a Type D visa to enter Switzerland long term legally in any case and that has to be applied for in her home country.

Good luck with walking into Zurich's migration office and asking them to walk through her case. Not only will they laugh before showing you the door, but it's a two-stage process and the Federal Migration Office has to have its say as well before any permit is approved. Does she plan to rock up on their doorstep too?

And iirc sharing forum accounts isn't allowed so she needs to make one for herself.
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Old 03.08.2015, 16:40
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

Sometime I really want to give more than 1 Thanks to the diligent Forum Legends
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Old 04.08.2015, 14:17
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

I didn't realize what the "Groan" icon was for until I read the comment from @Today Only. I couldn't identify anything constructive or positive in that post, and hence found myself questioning the purpose??! I actually took the time to look at some of my previous posts that they'd commented on, and it was the same there. Added value = 0. If you really must continue with pointless posts, may I suggest you run the spell check before posting.

Onto the post from @Medea Fleecestealer and as suspected, yes, my post was on behalf of my partner. I wasn't aware of the strict sharing of profile restrictions on this site, but rest assured that I'm now informed. It's nice to be reminded that I'm in CH, even whilst online. Moreover, I found the tone of your "So, frankly you already know what the answers will be." comment to be assumptive and - quite frankly - a little derogatory. I will leave this here, since I also acknowledge the few helpful sentences you posted.

Notwithstanding, I appreciate the clarity that was provided in response to my post. Thanks.
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Old 04.08.2015, 15:21
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

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...yes, my post was on behalf of my partner. I wasn't aware of the strict sharing of profile restrictions on this site, but rest assured that I'm now informed. It's nice to be reminded that I'm in CH, even whilst online. Moreover, I found the tone of your "So, frankly you already know what the answers will be." comment to be assumptive and - quite frankly - a little derogatory...
Hopefully now you understand why we ask users to maintain separate accounts. Had Medea not referenced the other post, the post on this thread would not have made sense - your profile says you're British - so of course you have the right to work here.

Let's get back to those questions:

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- Which permit am I best applying for, from available quota and likeliness of approval perspectives? e.g. L, B or International Training Agreement
- How long will it take realistically from start to permit-in-hand?
- Are there any quick wins to be had? e.g. set appointment with the local Immigration Dept to walk through my case etc.
- Will I need to leave CH at any point before receiving aforementioned permit?
- There are only 6,500 permits available for non-EUs in 2015 (excluding the folks married to EU/Swiss). See this thread for a discussion. This means it's extra tough compared to previous years for your girlfriend to get a permit on her own. She needs to really stand out to make an employer jump through the hoops and pay the money to apply for the permit. Anecdotally I'd say the big companies have more experience and more cash, and probably get the bulk of the permits.

- If she found an employer today, it would probably take 8-12 weeks for any permit to be approved. During this time she would have to leave the country to apply for the D-visa for long-term entry. I'll be honest, I'm married to a Swiss and my most recent permit renewal took 10 weeks.

- Unfortunately, the only quick win is the one you're trying to avoid - either registering her on a concubine permit or getting married. Someone else said on another thread, "Swiss like round pegs for round holes." This is especially true for permits. You either tick all the tidy boxes or you don't. They don't do gray areas and let you plead your case. Plus, it would be the employer that had to plead the case, not you.

- Yes. I assume since your other post was in January she's already had to leave and wait 90 days to return.

I realize she's already got a few degrees, but one other option to consider is for her to enroll as a student somewhere. I am not sure, but I believe intensive language classes from approved schools would count. She would not be able to work full-time, but she'd get her foot in the door on a permit, improve her German skills (and therefore her attractiveness to potential employers) and still be able to network and apply for jobs. Worth a shot if you both are not ready for the concubine or marriage step.
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Old 04.08.2015, 16:00
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Re: Chances of getting a work permit ( non-EU )

"Thanks for all the feedback...and yes, I was already well aware of the mountain to climb here"

Your words, not mine.

Again frankly, as 3Wishes has said your B and C options are quicker than trying your plan A. Whether she could work on a concubine permit I don't know, but certainly if she's married to you she'll have the same permit including work rights.

During the discussion with the school did they say they were prepared to apply for a permit for her? If they didn't, then I doubt they'll take it any further. If they thought they had a good chance of proving her case they'd have said so - or should have done as it's unfair to her to lead her on when they have no intention of applying. If they did then it's worth pursuing further - get down to getting an actual contract subject to permit approval, etc. It costs too much time and money for them to try without a good chance of success.
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