Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Help & tips > Permits/visas/government
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25.02.2015, 11:19
thinking's Avatar
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: not sure yet
Posts: 5
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thinking has no particular reputation at present
Is there an English translation of the labor law?

The law translates something like "Federal law on work, trade and commerce"

Original: http://www.admin.ch/opc/de/classifie...049/index.html

The law itself is in German, French and Italian.
Has any organization or company made a translation of it?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 25.02.2015, 11:22
MathNut's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Kt. Glarus
Posts: 4,232
Groaned at 35 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 9,962 Times in 3,068 Posts
MathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Quote:
View Post
The law translates something like "Federal law on work, trade and commerce"

Original: http://www.admin.ch/opc/de/classifie...049/index.html

The law itself is in German, French and Italian.
Has any organization or company made a translation of it?
Not that I know of. I can read German pretty well though; what's the particular bit you're curious about?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank MathNut for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 25.02.2015, 11:27
mirfield's Avatar
Moddy McModface
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Basel
Posts: 8,189
Groaned at 50 Times in 44 Posts
Thanked 8,043 Times in 2,943 Posts
mirfield has a reputation beyond reputemirfield has a reputation beyond reputemirfield has a reputation beyond reputemirfield has a reputation beyond reputemirfield has a reputation beyond reputemirfield has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

There's this, but it's an overview, rather than a direct translation;

http://knowledge.leglobal.org/wp-con...witzerland.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 25.02.2015, 11:29
thinking's Avatar
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: not sure yet
Posts: 5
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thinking has no particular reputation at present
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Quote:
View Post
Not that I know of. I can read German pretty well though; what's the particular bit you're curious about?
I am trying to find the section that (allegedly) says that employees need to keep timesheets for their own protection. So that employers won't force them to work overtime etc. My German/French are not on the level to find this in the law. Maybe it is just not there?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 25.02.2015, 12:46
MathNut's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Kt. Glarus
Posts: 4,232
Groaned at 35 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 9,962 Times in 3,068 Posts
MathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond reputeMathNut has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Quote:
View Post
I am trying to find the section that (allegedly) says that employees need to keep timesheets for their own protection. So that employers won't force them to work overtime etc. My German/French are not on the level to find this in the law. Maybe it is just not there?
Not in the law. Perhaps there may have been a court case which set such a precedent, don't know though.

It does sound reasonable to me that somebody needs to be keeping track of hours, in a position/industry where the concept of overtime exists (some are excluded). Otherwise you might claim compensation for overtime, the company says "what overtime?" and it's your memory against theirs.

But I don't see a section of the employment code that says so, let alone says whose responsibility the record-keeping has to be.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 25.02.2015, 15:29
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Valais
Posts: 88
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 73 Times in 36 Posts
Potrzebie has become a little unpopular
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Quote:
View Post
I am trying to find the section that (allegedly) says that employees need to keep timesheets for their own protection. So that employers won't force them to work overtime etc. My German/French are not on the level to find this in the law. Maybe it is just not there?
I've just had a look through the law and found nothing relevant. In any case it is wildly improbable that such a provision would be part of a statute.

On the other hand, regulations take up such issues. Here you find the rule that overtime must be addressed in the contract of employment: http://www.entsendung.admin.ch/cms/c...eitregelung_fr

Quote:
View Post
Not in the law. Perhaps there may have been a court case which set such a precedent, don't know though.

It does sound reasonable to me that somebody needs to be keeping track of hours, in a position/industry where the concept of overtime exists (some are excluded). Otherwise you might claim compensation for overtime, the company says "what overtime?" and it's your memory against theirs.

But I don't see a section of the employment code that says so, let alone says whose responsibility the record-keeping has to be.
Bear in mind that in Swiss law (and in Civil Law countries generally), unlike English/Scottish law, a court case does not define what the law is beyond the case in question, unless it comprises jurisprudence constante, i.e. a substantially identical result in case after case.

If you have an actual dispute or question, your cantonal labour office should be able to direct you to what your, and your employer's, responsibilities are.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02.03.2015, 14:08
Mica's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 606
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 745 Times in 330 Posts
Mica has a reputation beyond reputeMica has a reputation beyond reputeMica has a reputation beyond reputeMica has a reputation beyond reputeMica has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Art. 46 ArbG in connection with Art. 73 ArbGV I.
see also the following document of SECO which describes the provisions in more detail (in German):
http://www.news.admin.ch/NSBSubscrib...ents/33319.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03.03.2015, 11:40
thinking's Avatar
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: not sure yet
Posts: 5
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thinking has no particular reputation at present
Re: Is there an English translation of the labor law?

Thank you for the help!
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"WundertŁte" is there a English translation? Tom73 Language corner 14 26.01.2011 22:17
4 years for a push - is the law an ass? Carlos R International affairs/politics 131 29.03.2010 11:48
Is there an A-Z of Zurich? Rachel888 Other/general 2 04.03.2008 21:45


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:28.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0