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View Poll Results: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?
YES! Dual or more nationality. 28 50.91%
YES! I will give up my existing passport to become purely Swiss. 4 7.27%
NO! I donít want to lose my native passport. 3 5.45%
NO! I donít think having a swiss passport will make any real difference to my life. 10 18.18%
Havenít decided yet... 10 18.18%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

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  #61  
Old 10.08.2015, 16:07
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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My friend's well-raised kid, when asked by his father to sign an agreement allowing his mother to live in her beloved home for her lifetime, happily did so.
. . .
This situation is nasty, but could have been prevented with the correct form of contract. Here is a quite a comprehensive article (ger: ) https://www.ktipp.ch/artikel/d/erbe-...lles-erhalten/
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  #62  
Old 10.08.2015, 16:09
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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I suspect a good chunk went to lawyers.

And the rest will likely be used up funding the Altersheim.

But sure as shootin' she doesn't plan to leave one Rappen behind for the lily.
Well patience is a virtue that the daughter in law clearly doesn't have. By jumping the gun she's probably lost out on a much bigger share of the estate.
My heart bleeds for her.
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  #63  
Old 10.08.2015, 16:16
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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Any well educated kid might be advised to take independent legal advise when asked to give up rights given in law. Especially when being advised by someone with a vested interest & able to put pressure on them. Of course in many countries signing under duress could make it null & void.
If someone can just say they were "made to sign under duress" even if not true, then I guess it makes the exercise rather pointless anyway?

I would also say that being a well-educated kid has zilch to do with trusting your father to act in their best interests... at 18 their education, no matter how good, would have nothing to do with wills and legal rights upon their fathers demise. If at 18 my kid and heir ran to a lawyer thinking I was in any way intending to screw him over then I would personally consider my parenting a failure. I know that at that age I would never have questioned my fathers intentions, and to this day I trust him implicitly.

Either way, clearly this isn't something you would clearly ask and rush into, it's something you would hopefully research well in advance and then painstakingly explain to those involved the reasons for why you are doing it, if in the end it is even required.

EDIT - If you meant that it is advisable to bring in a lawyer to advise them so that they can have a third-party advice and witness to the signing then ok I see how that could be a benefit.

Last edited by Richdog; 10.08.2015 at 16:28.
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  #64  
Old 10.08.2015, 16:20
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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Why do you think the UK is going to fall apart?
Because Nicola says so
What remains of England, South of Watford (Farageland) will have the M4 turned into one long runway (Borisway) and will be applying to the Swiss confederation for entry -big selling point with be to give Bern sea access and lots of airspace to fly F-15s
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  #65  
Old 10.08.2015, 16:37
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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If someone can just say they were "made to sign under duress" even if not true, then I guess it makes the exercise rather pointless anyway?

I would also say that being a well-educated kid has zilch to do with trusting your father to act in their best interests... at 18 their education, no matter how good, would have nothing to do with wills and legal rights upon their fathers demise. If at 18 my kid and heir ran to a lawyer thinking I was in any way intending to screw him over then I would personally consider my parenting a failure. I know that at that age I would never have questioned my fathers intentions, and to this day I trust him implicitly.

Either way, clearly this isn't something you would clearly ask and rush into, it's something you would hopefully research well in advance and then painstakingly explain to those involved the reasons for why you are doing it, if in the end it is even required.

EDIT - If you meant that it is advisable to bring in a lawyer to advise them so that they can have a third-party advice and witness to the signing then ok I see how that could be a benefit.
Surely getting it confirmed at the time by the notary covers the "under duress" part? If not then no contract would ever be binding, someone could always come back later and claim this.
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  #66  
Old 10.08.2015, 17:22
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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My friend's well-raised kid, when asked by his father to sign an agreement allowing his mother to live in her beloved home for her lifetime, happily did so.

And some years (and a rising property market) later that well-raised kid married the daughter-in-law from hell. Who would not rest until her husband she got her hands on the money. Son gave in to the nagging, claimed he was forced to sign under duress, and got the agreement set aside.

Mom now lives all alone in an Alterswohnung, surrounded by strangers.

How sharper than a serpent's tooth...
Unfortunately, I've seen this one happens to some of my parents' friends as well. The money is very much earned by the now old parents not their children and spouses (or any other living relatives that might not be nice during their life time). In my opinion it's the right of the parents to give or not to give inheritance.

That aside, I'm one of the people that's planning to live here permanently and call Swiss as my home but reluctant to get the Swiss pass because I'll lose my original pass if I do. Yes, having a Swiss pass will definitely help especially for travels, less visa to apply and probably better security. But I do love my other home country as well and perhaps in 20-30 years who knows what will happen, perhaps one day my original pass will worth much more than Swiss pass. Who knows?
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  #67  
Old 10.08.2015, 17:27
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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No, that is incorrect.

Unmarried partners can leave 25% to their partner, the rest goes to the extended family of the deceased.

Tom
OK, I may be misremembering, or rather that was the situation with a very small family and no extendeds. In the situation where a married couple has no living parents or uncles or aunts and one spouse has siblings and the other doesn't, it is not possible for both spouses to leave everything to the other. The spouse with a sibling will get everything when they are widowed, but the one without siblings will have to share with their late spouse's siblings - if they were not married, the situation would not have arisen

(I took this from the Credit Suisse flowchart that has been linked to on here before but was no longer live last time I looked. I think Meloncollie provided the link so maybe she still remembers where to look?)
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  #68  
Old 10.08.2015, 17:33
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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If I'm correctly interpreting what Meloncollie is referring to, the forced inheritance stuff is not just about children but the fact that in the absence of children, the court dealing with probate then starts looking down other lines such as siblings of the deceased and their progeny, and failing that aunts and uncles of the deceased and their progeny. That leaves an awful lot of people with a potential claim on the estate in a large-ish family.
I'm an only child of 2 only children, and my mother's will was exceedingly straightforward yet I've just had to complete a form from the court declaring that my mother had no other marriages than to my late father and no other children either within or outside marriage. This for the purpose of the court discharging its legal obligation to check whether there are other statutory heirs
True. The lady who lived in my flat, before I moved in, passed away and had her assets divided up between no less than 18 'relatives', her husband had already died and they had had no children. None of the 'relatives' lived in the area, not even the same canton, the nearest one was a niece in ZH who dealt with the paperwork, most were in BE, none of the 18 wanted to buy out the other 17 shares in the flat, they were totally disorganised, all basically just waiting for the money, which they got only after one and half years after their relative's death.
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  #69  
Old 10.08.2015, 18:18
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Re: Do you plan on getting a Swiss passport?

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Surely getting it confirmed at the time by the notary covers the "under duress" part? If not then no contract would ever be binding, someone could always come back later and claim this.
I didn't understand immediately from fattie's post which aspect of having a lawyer he was talking about... now that I do I agree that voluntarily bringing-in a third-party witness would potentially save a lot of trouble down the line in case your spawn does turn out to be a callous scrote.
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