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  #21  
Old 09.03.2010, 15:04
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

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It's clear that he isn't 100% Rotti, although much younger at only 8 months he is a little taller than Kyra but only half her weight. We didn't really like his name (in French pronounced Die-Ron) so we changed it to Dylan which he now answers to. Although not trained he is learning very quickly, he is so soft, gentle and loving and although he follows us around everywhere, he's quite happy sleeping on his own.

here he is (on the left) with Kyra.


You've done a great thing, both for Kyra and Dylan. What lucky dogs. While a dog is wonderful companion to humans, I think they need dog companions.

All our pets are rescues, and each comes with a story of how they ended up homeless before we adopted them. They have brought so much to our lives. A rescued pet often does come with "baggage" and is often not trained, but dogs are smart, they learn quickly. Sadly they don't forget their past but with time and love they do learn to trust again.

Wishing you many happy years together.
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  #22  
Old 11.03.2010, 09:18
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

I was following the thread here because I am interested in acquiring a dog from a 'pound' also and this conversation peaked my interest.
I am a new member to this English forum, and I hope I dont add this comment in the wrong space, but here goes...

What I dont see is a reference to a link that we have been using on our recent search for a dog, and that is

http://www.petfinder.ch/

which looks like a really great site. Pounds from all over Europe have come together in one site and I think this may really help alot of readers if they are searching for a new pet. Its a very well done site, although we have as yet not had success finding the right dog with it.

Just thought I'd pass that along to you guys.
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  #23  
Old 11.03.2010, 13:58
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

Congratulations on your new addition, Grumpy Grapefruit! Dylan is simply stunning - he looks so very happy with your family, and he and Kyra look like a match made in heaven. Wishing you all many happy years together.

---

I've been on both sides of the fence, as an adopter and as a rescue volunteer.

I love all critters, but dogs are my passion, and rough collies and shelties hold a special place in my heart. My first collie was a private rescue; although I grew up with dogs and had one of my own, prior to his coming into my life I had no idea that there was a dark side to the dog world. While my boy's physical wounds eventually healed, the trauma of the horrific abuse he had suffered at the hands of his first owner left him a mental wreck. But despite his on-going struggle with the demons of his past, he was a loving and loyal friend; he taught me all about second chances. It was in his memory that I got involved in rescue work.

I should quickly point out, though, that most dogs in rescue are not abuse cases like my boy, and many end up there through no fault of their own. Many have no behavior issues or 'baggage' at all, many are easy going friendly dogs, some are already trained, some even are young puppies... so many dogs end up in rescue simply because they had the misfortune have been bought by people who were not prepared for the long term commitment dog ownership means.

I strongly encourage anyone considering adding a pet to the family to consider going the rescue route - a quick look at the Tierschutz database today shows 285 dogs and 374 cats, as well as rabbits, guinea pigs, birds, even goats in need of homes. (And the numbers in other countries are absolutely shocking...)

---

While living here I have adopted three dogs from rescues in Switzerland; I've also adopted others from rescues or via private adoptions in Germany, Spain, Italy and France. My Swiss mutts came from:

Tierschutzbund Basel:
http://www.tierschutzbund.ch/

SPA Fribourg:
http://www.spafribourg.ch/cms/

And from another rescue whose practices were perhaps not what I would have liked to see. Nonetheless, they found my boy his forever home - which is in the end what really counts. (I understand that this rescue is now under new management, and have heard that conditions have improved since then.)

When looking to adopt, I tend to go first to the Tierschutz database already mentioned: http://www.tierdatenbank.ch/cms/tier...unschtier.html

I also keep an eye on various German collie rescue sites, and have put the word out on a few collie and sheltie forums. Breed-specific rescue groups tend not to be too common in Switzerland, but there are several in Germany. If you are looking for a certain breed and cannot find one in rescue in Switzerland, consider looking a bit farther afield.

ETA: The link previously posted here is no longer active. To search for breed rescues in Germany, google (.de) the breed name plus terms like 'in Not', 'heimatlos', 'Notfall', 'suchen ein Zuhause', etc.
----

When I come across a dog who tugs at my heartstrings, the first step is a discussion with the rescue. It's important to be realistic about what you are looking for in a dog, to know what you can - and cannot - provide. I know my strengths as a dog owner and, even though I have a fair amount of experience in rehabilitation, I also know my limitations. And I have come to know the limits of tolerance of my neighbors, too. What I have to offer must meet what the individual dog needs; no matter how good a home I believe mine may be, some dogs would not be happy living with us. Here I have to defer to the judgement of the rescue.

Because I have an established pack I need to ensure that a new family member will fit in with the group. The adoption process is a bit more time consuming because of this; I generally need to schedule several visits to assess the compatibility of the dogs. I introduce the dogs on neutral ground - we do some quiet on lead parallel walking, if that goes well the dogs greet each other. Then a bit of sniffing, some more walking and some play. I do this with the Boss Dog first, and then introduce each of the crew. I assess individual interaction, and group interaction.

As other posters have mentioned, the rescue also needs to assess me. There is usually a pre-adoption questionnaire and/or interview, then a chance to meet the dog and an assessment of the chemistry on both sides. Most rescues ask that all family members (canine and human) be involved. Then many rescues will ask for a home check (Vorkontrolle, Platzkontrolle), a visit to your home to ensure that your set-up is safe for the dog and meets the dog's physical needs. A home check is also another opportunity to assess if your family is right for the dog - as well as if the dog is right for the family. Some rescues ask for references - your vet or trainer are good choices. Some rescues will do a post adoption home visit either in lieu of, or in addition to, a home check. If you are renting, expect to bring proof that you are allowed dogs in your lease.

It's worth pointing out that each rescue sets it's own policies and adoption guidelines. Some rescues have firm blanket rules, others are fairly flexible. Most will have their adoption policies detailed on their websites. To avoid heartbreak, do be sure you meet their 'must haves' before you get too far into the process. And if you don't meet one rescue's fixed requirements, look further - chances are another may be able to help you.

In addition to general guidelines, the rescue will probably have set adoption criteria specific to the dog, based on their assessment of him. These might include:

Can the dog live with other dogs, or would he prefer to to have his family all to himself?
Does the dog need to live with another dog?
Can the dog live with another dog of the same sex?
Can the dog live with cats or other animals?
Can the dog live with young children? Older children?
Does the dog need access to a garden? Does he need a fenced-in garden, and if so, how high must the fence be?
Does the dog need a home without stairs?
Can the dog live in a flat, or does he need a detached home?
Can the dog live in the city, or does he need a more rural home?
Does the dog need someone at home at all times, or can he be left for a period of time?
Does the dog needs a quiet home? Or would he enjoy a busier household?
Does the dog need an active home? How much physical activity does the dog need?
Is the dog appropriate for inexperienced owners?
Does the dog need someone with experience of his breed?
Does the dog need someone with experience of rehabilitating certain behavioral issues?
Does the dog need someone with experience of caring for certain medical conditions?

Expect to be questioned as to how you would meet the criteria set for the dog you are looking to adopt. If you meet many of the criteria, but not all, and feel that your home would nonetheless be right be for the dog, be prepared to 'sell' yourself a bit. I've adopted dogs where I did not meet all criteria, but I showed the rescue that I could provide an acceptable alternative.

Remember that the goal is not just to find a home - the goal is to find the right forever home for the dog. While the interview may seem a bit intrusive it's important to remember that the dog has already been let down by his people at least once - the rescue is trying to ensure that that does not happen again.

---

Adoption fees can vary rather widely; I have paid between CHF 400 and € 800 for my dogs. It should be noted that adoption fees rarely cover the costs incurred by the rescue; most rescues rely on private donations and fundraising in order to be able to carry on the good work they do. The cost of kenneling is very high; in Switzerland a stray animal whose owners are untraceable must by law be kept 60 days before rehoming, and many end up waiting much longer than that. One of my dogs was in the shelter for 18 months before I found him. But kenneling costs pale in comparison to vet costs. Rescues generally vaccinate and provide medical treatment as needed, some do training or behavorist work as needed as well. The rescue I volunteer with often has dogs in their care whose individual vet bills run well into the thousands...

(If you have had a good experience with a rescue, please consider on-going support.)

Many, if not most, rescues will neuter/spay a dog before rehoming, or if that is not possible during the dog's stay in the shelter, the rescue will include a neutering clause in the adoption contract. This is because overpopulation is the number one reason that dogs end up in shelters - or dead. There are simply too many dogs born for available homes. As a safeguard, one rescue I know of doubles the adoption fee for a puppy too young to be neutered - and then upon proof of neutering refunds that additional amount. A good practice, I think.

Obviously some dogs cannot be neutered due to medical conditions, a few are recommended to be kept entire because of behavioral issues - this is something the rescue would discuss with you. But it is important that potential adopters understand that neutering/spaying is fundamental to most rescues' definition of responsible dog ownership.

---

As has been mentioned, all first time dog owners must complete the SKN theory course before acquiring a dog. If you are thinking about adopting a dog, do this before you start your search! And, all owners must complete the practical part of the SKN with each and every dog within the first 12 months of ownership. Some rescues offer these classes themselves, some can recommend trainers to you, or take a look at the BVet website link given in EastEnder's post for the official list of trainiers certified to offer the SKN.

Many rescues will strongly encourage owners to pursue additional training, for some dogs it may be a requirement in the adoption contract. Some rescues offer training support, or on-going advice - discuss this with the rescue if you have questions or concerns.

(With my volunteer hat on - during an interview I place a lot of emphasis on training, as an owner's inability or unwillingness to invest the time needed to train and socialize a dog is a recurring reason why dogs end up in rescue. I question potential owners about their understanding what it means to train a dog, and am very interested in their thoughts on various training practices. Just a hint. )

---

One thing that may surprise adopters is that some rescues retain legal ownership of the dog. You become the 'Halter', the rescue remains the owner, and this is noted on the Anis database. This is a safeguard for the dog - should you be unable to care for the dog at any point of his life you would be required to return him to the rescue rather than pass him on. Also, the rescue retains the right to reclaim the dog if you are in breach of the adoption conditions. As with any contract, read the document carefully and make sure you understand it.

---
Adopting a 'second hand' pet - quite literally saving a life - is very, very rewarding. Please - if you are thinking about adding a pet to your family, consider rescue.

And if I may add a special plea: Please consider adopting an older pet. Too many senior dogs and cats are abandoned; these sweet old souls have so much love left to give, and are often very easy to care for. Yes, you may not have as many years together - but the time you do have will be very special indeed.

---

Thanks for starting this thread, GG! Here's hoping that the dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, guinea pigs and other pets waiting in Swiss shelters soon find the forever homes they so deserve.




ETA: Gosh - apologies for the length of this missive. I blame the mutts - for once they are all asleep, leaving me with unaccustomed free time...



By the way, fellow collie and sheltie fans may find the following sites of interest:

http://collies-suchen-ein-zuhause.de/
http://www.collie-in-not.de/
http://www.sheltie-in-not.de/
http://sos-colley.forumactif.com/
http://www.sos-colliehilfe.de/
http://www.collie-in-nood.com/

.

Last edited by meloncollie; 02.10.2012 at 23:17. Reason: 02.20.2012 - updated links
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  #24  
Old 11.03.2010, 14:06
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

WOW......hey mods !! THAT post should be a sticky or stand alone and out .


WOW meloncollie you are a gem,thank you !
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Old 11.03.2010, 14:22
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

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WOW......hey mods !! THAT post should be a sticky or stand alone and out .


WOW meloncollie you are a gem,thank you !
Exactly. I say that should be the first post on this thread!
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Old 03.04.2010, 00:55
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

[QUOTE=meloncollie;735484]

---

As has been mentioned, all first time dog owners must complete the SKN theory course before acquiring a dog. If you are thinking about adopting a dog, do this before you start your search! And, all owners must complete the practical part of the SKN with each and every dog within the first 12 months of ownership.



Does anyone know if these courses are available in English - or at a push, French - in Canton Zug? My German is definitely NOT up to any sort of test yet.
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Old 03.04.2010, 01:24
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

First the good news - there is no test to take, the requirement is simply course attendance. Don't worry overmuch about language skills - what is really important is learning to understand 'Hundisch'.

Here is the database of certified trainers - call around those in your area and ask if the trainer would be willing to do the course in English or French. And if that's not an option, chances are that another class participant might be able to translate for you.

http://bvet.bytix.com/plus/trainer/

Good luck!
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Old 03.04.2010, 13:22
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

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First the good news - there is no test to take, the requirement is simply course attendance. Don't worry overmuch about language skills - what is really important is learning to understand 'Hundisch'.

Here is the database of certified trainers - call around those in your area and ask if the trainer would be willing to do the course in English or French. And if that's not an option, chances are that another class participant might be able to translate for you.

http://bvet.bytix.com/plus/trainer/

Good luck!
Just to add on top of this - certain trainers I have come across are also willing to do an all English class if there are 2-3 interested parties. I had to do my course in German then because I didnt think of posting on EF at that point in time, to get the numbers essential for an all English class.

Post on EF if you are looking to do the class in English. You will never know, others out there might be looking to do the same.
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  #29  
Old 12.04.2010, 15:37
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

I've been keeping an eye on this thread with interest because we've been going through the process as posts have been added.

We lost our old giant schnauzer to cancer in Nov 2007, leaving our deerhound as an only dog. He's been pretty much OK but of late we'd noticed him becoming more introverted and talking himself into fears of things such as slippery tiled floors. We'd been batting about the idea of another dog for a few months but the time was never quite right / it was still too soon after losing Caspar / we couldn't agree on a breed as we would only want a big dog but chances are it would spend a lot of time on our boat sometime in the future so we had to consider that practicality. My OH was very keen on another giant schnauzer, I was less so because Caspar, much loved though he was, was a real handful. I was keen on a labradoodle but OH wouldn't entertain the idea. We thought we might both consider a GSD.

So come the beginning of March, we felt it was time to put some feelers out so we googled the various Tierschutzvereine and found the Tierschutz database, and alongside all the GSDs there were 2 giant schnauzers listed. I agreed we could look at a giant and find out whether it was just Caspar that was too much (his breeder did tell us he was going to be an arsy one and she was right!). The first giant had already found a new home, the second was still looking.

Heros is quite small for a giant schnauzer, he's nearly 4 and was evidently born on a farm. We first went to see him in about the second week of March. He had been living in a boarding kennel in Thurgau since the beginning of November having been first owned by a couple who were totally inconsistent with him (and in the husband's case evidently really harsh - in fact we keep seeing signs of what he did to the poor mite), and then shoved from pillar to post when they split up. The kennel's owner is on the board of her local Tierschutzverein so she eventually said, well just leave him here and we'll rehome him.

We found him to be a very sweet, friendly dog, an uncastrated male, and a completely different character from our old giant. In fact if we hadn't had the deerhound, we'd have said "yes" there and then. We then made an appointment to go back the following week with our deerhound (also an uncastrated male) to see whether they would get on. Evidently another couple were also interested in him, but the kennel owner said she would actually prefer him to go to us for various reasons, providing the two dogs got on of course. The following week we took our deerhound up on the Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday to walk them together and introduce them gradually. The first day involved a walk with the kennel owner and there were a couple of minor dominance postures. On the second visit the two dogs recognised each other and were glad to see each other and we walked them alone. Each subsequent visit improved again, with our deerhound then going into the kennel's outrun which was Heros' territory. The following week, the kennel owner brought Heros over here to visit us at home, go for a walk with both dogs, then allow both dogs into the garden together and, if all went well, for Heros to be allowed in the house - which he was.

Since this gradual process was looking very promising, albeit with the 2 dogs not yet having worked out their respective positions, we collected Heros on the next Saturday, which was by now the end of March. At this point the contract was signed and money paid (CHF 400), but for his sake, since we also have 2 cats, the contract included a 2 week probation period within which either party could back out, dog would be returned and money refunded. The kennel owner gave us a list of "rules" to follow to ease the introduction (usual things like don't feed in the same room, don't allow any dominant behaviour including leaning), most of which we had already considered, and I'm glad to say the probation period is over and he's still here

We're still taking it very gently with the 2 dogs as it's relatively early days with two entire males and our deerhound is too elderly and delicate just to let them tumble around together. As Heros begins to feel more comfortable he's pushed some boundaries with us (well he is a schnauzer) but never seems to make the same mistake twice. It's clearly going to take some time for him to (allow himself to) believe that he isn't just being shoved about again. We're finding that someone has worked very hard on training him, he's absolutely perfectly mannered in a restaurant and both dogs were fine (and lying peacefully close together) when we took them for a drink in the bar last week. The two dogs haven't shared the back of a car yet - and in fact might not ever do so because our deerhound has just been diagnosed with degenerative myelopathy (in hindsight symptoms have been showing for about 18 months) so he probably needs his space. On the other hand, Heros seems to have given him back his interest in life. The cats have posed no problem whatsoever. As a farm dog until the age of 6 months I would be surprised if Heros hadn't encountered cats before, he's certainly reasonably circumspect with them. Our cats have lived with big dogs all their lives so they have no fear and are very well aware that there is a certain speed of motion over which they'll likely be chased and under which the dogs will just watch them. One of our cats has been pushing Heros' boundaries as hard as she can, winding around underneath him and around his nose, and has only got very wet (from licking) for her efforts. It's still early days, but on the whole very promising, and with our deerhound's diagnosis, we feel we've done the right thing at just the right time.

Last edited by eng_ch; 12.04.2010 at 15:51.
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  #30  
Old 12.04.2010, 15:48
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

Congrats, eng_ch!

It sounds like Hero has found the perfect family - here's to many happy adventures together!

(And we'll be keeping all paws crossed for your deerhound - I know DM all too well. So glad to hear that having a new friend has perked him up so.)
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Old 12.04.2010, 17:15
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

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Congrats, eng_ch!

It sounds like Hero has found the perfect family - here's to many happy adventures together!

(And we'll be keeping all paws crossed for your deerhound - I know DM all too well. So glad to hear that having a new friend has perked him up so.)
Thank you. Would be interested to hear your experiences with DM if you had time to PM me
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  #32  
Old 12.04.2010, 19:13
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

Well done Eng for having made Heros' integration into your family as easy as is possible. He sounds absolutely adorable, and I wish you, your OH and all your critters much happiness together. Please also give your deerhound a gentle hug from me.

Congratulations on the arrival of your new family member!
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Old 21.04.2010, 22:33
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

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So, I'll kick off.

Recently we decided that a companion was required for our 20 month old Rottweiler Kyra. She has a great life up here but is too big to play with the cats and, after a kick, a bit too small for the horses. We decided to get another Rotti and spent a couple of months searching the rescue centres in CH and finally found one in at SPANE in Colombier, just south of Neuchatel.

3 weeks ago, we drove down with Kyra to take a look at Dyron. It appears he was illegally smuggled into Switzerland from France with a docked tail. Nobody wanted him (partly because of the tail but also because of the breed). We introduced the 2 dogs together in a large exercise pen and after a minute or so of growling and bristling they got on like a house on fire and played non-stop for almost 2 hours.

We expected that a home visit would be in order but we brought photos of home and of the other animals and maybe it was that as well as how well the dogs got on (not to mention a 3 hour drive) that persuaded the shelter to let us take him home that evening. We paid 180 francs and were told his passport would be posted to us within a week with a vets certificate confirming that the tail was docked whilst a puppy and before he was brought into Switzerland and that he was "legal". He was clearly loved there as all the volunteers working that evening came out to say good bye to him.

We were a little worried about the long drive home but he was as quiet as a mouse, the only murmer we got from him was when we were climbing up the mountain and his ears must have been popping!

It's clear that he isn't 100% Rotti, although much younger at only 8 months he is a little taller than Kyra but only half her weight. We didn't really like his name (in French pronounced Die-Ron) so we changed it to Dylan which he now answers to. Although not trained he is learning very quickly, he is so soft, gentle and loving and although he follows us around everywhere, he's quite happy sleeping on his own.

here he is (on the left) with Kyra.



And a little video of him enjoying his first snow storm!

Rheemah the mountain She is so adorable Beutifull animals and location!
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  #34  
Old 05.04.2011, 19:03
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

I saw this thread linked in a post by Meloncollie earlier and thought it was time for a bump and an update on Dylans progress.

It was clear soon after we adopted him that although he was very playful and loved running to chase things, he was running a bit lopsided. He also hops like mad (albeit playfully), a bit like a rabbit. We had him checked over and an X-ray showed a fractured bone in his leg that had caused some other problems, he also has some form of arthritis.

Having said that, it doesn't stop him playing, even if he has pain.

Re training, he's not as intelligent as Kyra but does learn from her, when we lay their food dishes down they are not allowed to eat until we give the command. Dylan will often watch Kyra, as well as me, to see when he can eat.

Once, while I was telling him off (difficult to do as he has such lovable big puppy eyes) I somehow lifted my foot, nothing directed at him, but he cowered away from me, it's clear that at some point he did get quite a kicking, maybe even causing the fractured leg.

He has absolutely no aggression though and will stop any bad behaviour at a call from us. He also has no ambitions to be anything more than bottom dog in our family unit. Visiting friends can be horrified to see the 2 dogs play fighting, jaws locked and growling like a couple of monsters, but I can put my hand between their open jaws and they will both instantly stop "fighting" and will start to lick my hand.

In all, adopting him has been the best thing I have ever done re animals. He is so loving and playful and seems to get so much joy just from being alive. Please, if you want a dog, don't forget the many like him who are desperate for a loving home and a second chance.

Last week we had to take 2 horses to near Toulouse and the dogs shared our 17 hour drive down there, we only stopped 3 times for gas and for the dogs to stretch their legs but not once did they complain. Here's a few photos of them making up for it the next day. Dylan is the one with the floppy ears and docked tail.













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Old 05.04.2011, 20:06
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

I had three cats (siblings from the same litter) from the rescue centre. They were 18 months old and have been wonderful pets. I'm unfortunately now down to one, who's 15 years old.

Here's the little monster.



Everyone wants kittens/puppies, but fully grown and mature animals deserve a home too, and make wonderful pets.
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  #36  
Old 05.04.2011, 21:58
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

grumpy, please please please stop posting pictures of your rotties. Same goes for anyone with Staffies. booohooo! I've been deciding between these 2 breeds, secretly trawling the tierheim databases, and plotting on how to get my landlord to say yes. argh.....

My resistence is really wearing very thin......
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Old 05.04.2011, 22:43
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

We went and had a look at the shelter of Lausanne but as soon as they found out we are foreign, and that we might leave the country in a year or two, they said it was not possible for us to adopt a cat or dog. It has something to do with the ownership of the animal, which remains with the shelter. Nevertheless, the man ALSO said that if we were to say we wanted to settle in switzerland and then after a year would "disappear" to another country, there would not be anyone coming after us. Between the lines I read that if we were to come back and try again after we "changed our minds" about staying in Switzerland, we could get a pet there. They only had one cat that was used to live in an apartment, though, and she didn't like us so much...
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Old 05.04.2011, 22:51
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

I used to be on a French Forum, and weekly, sometimes daily - someone put a thread about having to leave the country and had to re-home 1, 2, 3 or even more pets of every kind. Also many left in a panic, leaving the animals behind or cutting them loose. I know many WILL do everything they can to take the animals with, whatever the cost and difficulties- but it can be really difficult, especially after a family break-up, illness or financial difficulties. So imho rescue centres are right to try everything to avoid yet another failure and heart break (yes, animals do suffer terribly). Good luck.
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Old 05.04.2011, 23:12
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

Of course we want to take the animals with us, and within the EU it shouldn't be so much more complicated than moving within Switzerland, provided you have the vet give your pet some shots, a chip and do some paperwork.
Divorces, illness, etc IMHO has nothing to do with leaving to another country or not, that is why most of the pets are in the shelter here in the first place. the only thing is that the shelter wants to be able to make sure the animal is taken care of, which is of course easier to do within the canton or Switzerland, than in another country. It is the right of the shelter to set conditions before they give their pets to someone, of course, because they do not want the animal to return to them, but I know I will take good care of a pet, for as long as it lives.
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Old 05.04.2011, 23:24
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Re: Adopting a pet from a Rescue Centre

It is a BIG problem with people from the UK who adopt pets abroad, never thinking that one day things might go wrong, for whatever reason. It takes 9 months to get a passport and all the vaccinations for return to the UK (as it does not have rabbies) and it is expensive especially with several animals.
So family break-up and financial trouble do play a huge part for returners to UK, or anybody moving to UK. And they always say the same 'we never thought it would happen to us' - nobody plans for family disasters and bankruptcy, but with the £ going down the pan, some people are truly feeling the pressure.
Of course people returning or moving to the US, OZ, and other countries will face enormous cost for transportation and often just cannot cope.
I am so glad you intend to take animals with you wherever you go.
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