Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Activities > Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:10
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Nyon
Posts: 1,830
Groaned at 61 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,128 Times in 835 Posts
John_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond repute
What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Last season was my first skiing for around 10 years.. I managed, did many days of mostly blue, some red and even one or two black runs and think i managed to not fall over at all ..But without much grace or skill!
Today I went for first day this season and felt like a beginner again.. Stood at the top of some steep slopes thinking oh sh1t.

I think I want to take a teacher for a half day and see what I'm doing wrong and try to help me.. it's hard to describe, i see other people coming down a steep slope gracefully side to side and controlled but i feel like Arrggghhh sdieways arrggghhhh other side arrggghhh straight down arrggghhh sideways .. I mean i manage it but it's hard work..

What is the best course of action? I don't think i want to start from the beginning but maybe it's best, group, private?

Ski experts?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:23
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,402
Groaned at 369 Times in 276 Posts
Thanked 22,402 Times in 10,081 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

There are probably 100s of possible and valid answers here. How old are you, how fit and sporty are you, what are your skiing ambitions, etc, etc. Did you intitially learn to ski with carving skis or traditional?

Sometimes, going back to the beginning is the best thing to do. I went for my first ever ski lesson after I had been skiing about 45 years- lol- and went back to the very beginning (on a week's advanced ski course with a top Scottish instructor in Tignes). It only took a couple of hours or less- but it illustrated well that the basic principles are the same, whether you snow plough, parralel ski or carve. If you can afford it- buy yourself a couple of hours with a good ski instructor- and see if s/he can sort out your 'problems' and solutions, then work on those. And then if you can, have a whole week of skiing with a couple of hours private lessons, or small group, for day one and two- and again on day 5..
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:26
Connor MacLeod's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: here
Posts: 765
Groaned at 89 Times in 58 Posts
Thanked 2,447 Times in 800 Posts
Connor MacLeod has a reputation beyond reputeConnor MacLeod has a reputation beyond reputeConnor MacLeod has a reputation beyond reputeConnor MacLeod has a reputation beyond reputeConnor MacLeod has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Who cares what you look like, if you get from top to bottom safely and most importantly are having fun then who cares.
Most 'graceful' skiers have been skiing since they could walk.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Connor MacLeod for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:38
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Nyon
Posts: 1,830
Groaned at 61 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,128 Times in 835 Posts
John_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Odile .. I never "learned" to ski at all .. Many years ago i rented some stuff and went for it until i could reach the bottom without a wipeout.. I have no idea about carving vs traditional. I'm 42 now and reasonably fit from a lot of cycling. I'm have no interest in being a champion but i want some better control and skill .. Something like that.

CMcL .. I don't really care what people think but without some skill it's pretty hard work. I think i would enjoy the day even more if it was less effort and more finesse.

I know for example that I lean too far back and instead of nicely sweeping the skis into a turn I sort of jump from side to side to drag the skis around. I either go really fast or I slow myself down with big clouds of snow
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:38
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Neuchatel
Posts: 19,402
Groaned at 369 Times in 276 Posts
Thanked 22,402 Times in 10,081 Posts
Odile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond reputeOdile has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Well yes and .... no. It's so amazing to be able to come down in control and feeling that you are doing it right, big carves, short fast turns, bumps- it just feels amazing. But of course it does depend on the questions above... and what you want to achieve.

(ps but you are right, I look a lot more graceful on skis or a board than on my limpy legs).
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:41
Island Monkey's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wallis
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 62 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 2,966 Times in 1,470 Posts
Island Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Stood at the top of some steep slopes thinking oh sh1t.
Well here is problem one.... why not start on an easier slope?

I'd advise a private lesson first, they can take you on an easy blue, see where your at, give you some things to work on. Then you could join a group or take a private every so often?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Island Monkey for this useful post:
  #7  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:42
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 13,781
Groaned at 209 Times in 181 Posts
Thanked 11,094 Times in 6,293 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Last season was my first skiing for around 10 years.. I managed, did many days of mostly blue, some red and even one or two black runs and think i managed to not fall over at all ..But without much grace or skill!
Today I went for first day this season and felt like a beginner again.. Stood at the top of some steep slopes thinking oh sh1t.

I think I want to take a teacher for a half day and see what I'm doing wrong and try to help me.. it's hard to describe, i see other people coming down a steep slope gracefully side to side and controlled but i feel like Arrggghhh sdieways arrggghhhh other side arrggghhh straight down arrggghhh sideways .. I mean i manage it but it's hard work..

What is the best course of action? I don't think i want to start from the beginning but maybe it's best, group, private?

Ski experts?
Equipment has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, what you were taught in the past will not help you with modern skis. You need to be taught to carve to get any benefit from their design.

Effective skiing will not be with your legs close together, so what you imagine is good skiing is probably not what it's about in 2015 going forward. If you look at Bond films from 40 years ago all the stunt skiers had their legs quite wide apart so it's nothing new.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:51
Island Monkey's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wallis
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 62 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 2,966 Times in 1,470 Posts
Island Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

If you want just one half day lesson, then private is really your only option. Groups normally run for a week. Where will you be skiing?

Without seeing you ski, if you've never had a lesson, I can imagine your major issues might be some or all of the following (because they are most peoples problems);

Leaning back. Make sure you lean forward, hips over your feet not behind them. Push your shins into the front of your boots.

Leaning to the inside of the turn. Your upper body isn't over your base of support (feet and skis). You need to lean your upper body a little to the outside of the turn to balance better and get your weight on the outside of the ski.

Moving your upper body too much, using your arms and shoulders to do the turn instead you should use your legs and feet to turn.

An instructor can give you plenty of exercises to do to help correct problems like this.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:52
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Nyon
Posts: 1,830
Groaned at 61 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,128 Times in 835 Posts
John_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

I was at Avoriaz today and saw quite a few people with a little attachment to keep the front of the skis together, parallel.. I noticed that when i tried that, even on a gentle straight slope I somehow always had a V shape, fronts naturally came together.. My natural stance is legs quite apart, especially on steeper slopes going side to side, one knee very bent, up the hill and the other almost straight downwards.

Equipment wise, yeah probably an issue too .. It's modern stuff but i just bought it, not professionally fitted etc.


Quote:
View Post
Equipment has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, what you were taught in the past will not help you with modern skis. You need to be taught to carve to get any benefit from their design.

Effective skiing will not be with your legs close together, so what you imagine is good skiing is probably not what it's about in 2015 going forward. If you look at Bond films from 40 years ago all the stunt skiers had their legs quite wide apart so it's nothing new.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 18.12.2015, 21:58
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Nyon
Posts: 1,830
Groaned at 61 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,128 Times in 835 Posts
John_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

So i guess that was my real question.. I probably have all of the faults and through trial and error I can still mange to reach the bottom in one piece..

Is it a reasonable ask to find an instructor to do this stuff with me.. By default if I look on ESF or ESS etc .. I can basically choose beginner or intermediate from a small list of options..

Location wise.. I'm near Nyon so would go anywhere within a couple of hours of there. Morzine - Leysin - St Cergues - Verbier etc etc ..


Quote:
View Post
If you want just one half day lesson, then private is really your only option. Groups normally run for a week. Where will you be skiing?

Without seeing you ski, if you've never had a lesson, I can imagine your major issues might be some or all of the following (because they are most peoples problems);

Leaning back. Make sure you lean forward, hips over your feet not behind them. Push your shins into the front of your boots.

Leaning to the inside of the turn. Your upper body isn't over your base of support (feet and skis). You need to lean your upper body a little to the outside of the turn to balance better and get your weight on the outside of the ski.

Moving your upper body too much, using your arms and shoulders to do the turn instead you should use your legs and feet to turn.

An instructor can give you plenty of exercises to do to help correct problems like this.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 18.12.2015, 22:02
Island Monkey's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wallis
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 62 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 2,966 Times in 1,470 Posts
Island Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
So i guess that was my real question.. I probably have all of the faults and through trial and error I can still mange to reach the bottom in one piece..

Is it a reasonable ask to find an instructor to do this stuff with me.. By default if I look on ESF or ESS etc .. I can basically choose beginner or intermediate from a small list of options..

Location wise.. I'm near Nyon so would go anywhere within a couple of hours of there. Morzine - Leysin - St Cergues - Verbier etc etc ..
If you take a private instructor, don't worry about the level, give them a rough idea of where you are at on the phone, then explain to your instructor on the day.
If you go to Verbier try European Snowsports or Altitude.

https://www.europeansnowsport.com/ski-school-verbier/
http://www.altitude-verbier.com
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 18.12.2015, 22:09
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 13,781
Groaned at 209 Times in 181 Posts
Thanked 11,094 Times in 6,293 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
So i guess that was my real question.. I probably have all of the faults and through trial and error I can still mange to reach the bottom in one piece..

Is it a reasonable ask to find an instructor to do this stuff with me.. By default if I look on ESF or ESS etc .. I can basically choose beginner or intermediate from a small list of options..

Location wise.. I'm near Nyon so would go anywhere within a couple of hours of there. Morzine - Leysin - St Cergues - Verbier etc etc ..
Any instructor will be able to asses your level within 15 seconds of skiing, just watching you put on your skis & stand still in them may even be enough!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #13  
Old 18.12.2015, 22:12
Island Monkey's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wallis
Posts: 3,383
Groaned at 62 Times in 32 Posts
Thanked 2,966 Times in 1,470 Posts
Island Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond reputeIsland Monkey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Any instructor will be able to asses your level within 15 seconds of skiing, just watching you put on your skis & stand still in them may even be enough!
Ooh earlier sometimes... walking towards you carrying their skis
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 18.12.2015, 22:20
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Nyon
Posts: 1,830
Groaned at 61 Times in 33 Posts
Thanked 2,128 Times in 835 Posts
John_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond reputeJohn_H has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

So .. When can you start?

I think i can look the part, that last section back to the lift i can whoosh down and skilfully arrive right at the gate in one nice big sweeping graceful motion.. Just that nobody saw me scream all the way down.



Quote:
View Post
Ooh earlier sometimes... walking towards you carrying their skis
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 18.12.2015, 23:00
lucas fitzpatrick's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: lenzerheide
Posts: 84
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 50 Times in 29 Posts
lucas fitzpatrick has no particular reputation at present
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Last season was my first skiing for around 10 years.. I managed, did many days of mostly blue, some red and even one or two black runs and think i managed to not fall over at all ..But without much grace or skill!
Today I went for first day this season and felt like a beginner again.. Stood at the top of some steep slopes thinking oh sh1t.

I think I want to take a teacher for a half day and see what I'm doing wrong and try to help me.. it's hard to describe, i see other people coming down a steep slope gracefully side to side and controlled but i feel like Arrggghhh sdieways arrggghhhh other side arrggghhh straight down arrggghhh sideways .. I mean i manage it but it's hard work..

What is the best course of action? I don't think i want to start from the beginning but maybe it's best, group, private?
Hi John_H

A couple of people have hit the nail on the head already.

Equipment does have a big effect on the way you ski now days. Firstly, make sure you rent equipment that is suited to your ability. There is no point having the best race gear and spend your time fighting the equipment. The same goes for those old skis you might have in the celler. Leave them there.

Go and take some private instruction. One on one or if you have a friend that is around the same level ask if they want to join in and share the costs. With private lessons you will get 100% of the instructors attention. It's worth paying the extra. Before you ring up a ski school and book a lesson have a few questions or requests ready. Your instructor needs to speak perfect English. They should have experience, older instructors have seen it all in their time and will have know how to fix any problems they see. If possible, get your instructor to meet you at the ski rental shop to help choose your equipment. A good ski school or instructor can help you out with everything.

When everything is organised and you meet your instructor tell him excatly what you want. It's your time, your money. Afterall, they are there to help you reach your goals.

If you need any more advice please feel free to pm me.

Lucas

Last edited by Ace1; 18.12.2015 at 23:08. Reason: fixing quoting
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank lucas fitzpatrick for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 18.12.2015, 23:05
Ace1's Avatar
A singular modality
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Engelberg & near Basel
Posts: 5,860
Groaned at 170 Times in 121 Posts
Thanked 8,902 Times in 3,984 Posts
Ace1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond reputeAce1 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

I think it's mostly been said, but I speak as an instructor with a little experience of teaching adults-with-habits. On the plus side, if you're generally confident about skiing around the mountain, you almost certainly have all the skills you need, so it's our job only to help you understand what it is you're actually doing when it works, and what's happening when it doesn't.

Your thought about taking a half-day private lesson are pretty much spot on, and you should be able to feel totally transformed by it. As pointed out, any instructor worth their salt should be able to spot when you're doing "wrong", but fundamentally there is not "wrong", there's only "better" ways of doing some things.

So don't fret; do try to find a native English speaker, and ideally someone who's experienced in teaching nervous adults, and prepare yourself to be pulled into the twentieth century at least, with perhaps a second lesson to bring you into the 21st.
__________________
Introduce yourself!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Ace1 for this useful post:
  #17  
Old 18.12.2015, 23:22
Dragon5's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Wolfhausen
Posts: 89
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 42 Times in 34 Posts
Dragon5 has no particular reputation at present
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Hi John H

The other guys IslandMonkey, FatmanFilms and lucas ( and Ace1 you've just posted ) have all said the same things about privetae lessons, which is good.
There is 1 lovely lesson from a Ski instructor, when you follow them 'EXACTLY' down a slope, any slope, shallow or steep, flat or moguls, the good instructors line is just magical.
When you can follow, not fast, just EXACTLY, then you get the best feeling of how to read the slope, the snow, the obstacles ( other skiers, trees ?? ) and often you can come down slopes which before were a problem.

Afterwards, don't push it, just flow .... have you tried with a mp3 player ???
Just make sure the beat co'incides with the turns !!!

Have fun and relax.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 18.12.2015, 23:38
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 13,781
Groaned at 209 Times in 181 Posts
Thanked 11,094 Times in 6,293 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Ooh earlier sometimes... walking towards you carrying their skis
I know a girl who skied from the age of 4, 10 years ago she spent 2 years in a wheelchair & was told she would never walk again. If you saw her carrying her skis you might think she could not ski. I am pretty sure she could beat most BASI 2 instructors down a steep mogul field & probably over most of the mountain.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank fatmanfilms for this useful post:
  #19  
Old 18.12.2015, 23:48
fatmanfilms's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Verbier
Posts: 13,781
Groaned at 209 Times in 181 Posts
Thanked 11,094 Times in 6,293 Posts
fatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond reputefatmanfilms has a reputation beyond repute
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Quote:
View Post
Hi John H

The other guys IslandMonkey, FatmanFilms and lucas ( and Ace1 you've just posted ) have all said the same things about privetae lessons, which is good.
There is 1 lovely lesson from a Ski instructor, when you follow them 'EXACTLY' down a slope, any slope, shallow or steep, flat or moguls, the good instructors line is just magical.
When you can follow, not fast, just EXACTLY, then you get the best feeling of how to read the slope, the snow, the obstacles ( other skiers, trees ?? ) and often you can come down slopes which before were a problem.

Afterwards, don't push it, just flow .... have you tried with a mp3 player ???
Just make sure the beat co'incides with the turns !!!

Have fun and relax.
Following is very good, it was actually used as a way to assess BASI ski instructor trainers 20 years ago who needed to read validate their qualification. They all started on a piste doing turns behind Phil Smith, just skiing down the run they built up a small mogul field, after a few runs some of these top ski instructors could not stay in the rut line they had themselves created. There was only 1 route to go.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 19.12.2015, 07:27
lucas fitzpatrick's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: lenzerheide
Posts: 84
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 50 Times in 29 Posts
lucas fitzpatrick has no particular reputation at present
Re: What to ask for from a ski lesson?

Following the instructor is one way and it is used to show clients turn shape, speed or guide the guest down a difficult part of a run. Unless the guest will ski with an instructor everyday they go skiing the will have to eventually step out from behind the instructor and find their own line.
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What salary (roughly) to ask for? Soma Employment 8 07.01.2014 15:32
Estate Agents - what's OK to ask / not ask chrisIDS Housing in general 4 07.03.2012 13:42
Ski lessons - looking for someone to join and share a lesson Wallabies Daily life 0 16.12.2011 21:25
Ski Virgin-Group novice ski lesson- MON 8th Feb. deutschmaad Social events 20 22.03.2010 20:43
[Brunni Alpthal]Looking for ski-beginner to share group lesson. pickles Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 0 20.12.2007 11:27


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:59.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0