Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Activities > Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 25.06.2010, 17:22
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Have a good time on the Faulhorn.

For those not quite so ambitious - this is the Year of Hiking.
These hikes are most likely on this site already but they are 32 pretty well-known ones which could appeal to folk who are so confused by the options that don't know where to start.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Longbyt for this useful post:
  #62  
Old 25.06.2010, 17:32
Tom1234's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kanton Luzern
Posts: 10,064
Groaned at 267 Times in 211 Posts
Thanked 14,178 Times in 5,756 Posts
Tom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond reputeTom1234 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Have a good time on the Faulhorn.

For those not quite so ambitious - this is the Year of Hiking.
These hikes are most likely on this site already but they are 32 pretty well-known ones which could appeal to folk who are so confused by the options that don't know where to start.
These 32 walks are also available in a colour booklet - available free in the foyer of any UBS bank branch, and as an iPOD app!

App

Last edited by Tom1234; 25.06.2010 at 17:42. Reason: Added Link to app
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Tom1234 for this useful post:
  #63  
Old 27.06.2010, 00:11
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Have fun, could have joined you, but we have an appointment with the Mythens this Saturday
Mission accomplished

Klein Mythen was a cool customer. I had been to the lower summit of Klein Mythen in winter condition, but had had to turn back then. Today, with perfect weather, the lower summit was straightforward. The last section, reaching to the main peak is the nicest part here. One has do descend about 10 m and then ascend about 50 m, both by easy climb. This hike is usually rated T4+ to T5.

The climb is not at all difficult, one doesn't need any equipment in summer, but it is still dangerous (with a few hundred meters vertical drops at many places), so if you have never climbed rock before, better not try alone the first time. If you climb at an intermediate level, if you are thirty-something, have climbed multi-pitches in your youth but are rusty now, it is still a piece of cake, and a delicious one at that.

Having done the Klein Mythen (1811m), we descended to Holzegg (1400m) to climb the Grosser Mythen (1899m). 500m ascent dispatched in 30 mins

Total time taken (Brunni-Zwuschet Mythen-Klein Mythen-Zwuschet Mythen-Holzegg-Grosse Mythen-Holzegg-Brunni): 5 1/2 hours, including a heavy lunch, a beer, and a consequent siesta on the Grosser Mythen. Walking time closer to 4 hours I think.

Overall recommendation: This has easily been the best hike I have done in Switzerland so far. By a wide margin. How I wish someone had posted about this on English forum earlier, I would have ditched Rigi and such mindless up and down runs long ago .

Grosser Mythen can be done by anybody, including kids of 5 years age in perfect dry weather.

Klein Mythen is fun, but not for everyone. As an example, the dude I was with, he is a decent mountain runner himself, he preferred to stop at the lower peak, on the other hand we saw some seriously old people going to the main peak.



For a more serious description of the hike I have reported here, see this report in German, but I use google translator and it can be funny too. The site also has countless solid hike reports. There is a third peak in the Mythen region, Haggenspitz, I plan to do all three peaks in a day (called the Mythen trilogy) but I might need a partner for that peak. My climbing friends wouldn't touch it because it is technically too easy (for them) or too aerobic (again, for them). Let me know if you know someone with similar needs, interests as me.

Cheers,
N
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank for this useful post:
  #64  
Old 28.06.2010, 17:23
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Safety discussion concerning climbing the Gross Mythen SZ on this Thread.


Quote:
View Post
LongByt - your post about the Chli Aubrig hike certainly fitted the bill for our five year old! For him it was a real mountain and a great day out.
Glad you enjoyed it. Mr L is pleased too. It takes quite a bit of time to put all the information together on the 'GPS-Thread' but if it helps someone to find a suitable walk it makes it all worthwhile.

For another day out - the Toggenburger 'Klangweg' is quite fun too, though for some of the 'sounds' I think you need to be a bit taller than a five year old. Later the Gotthard Route would be great fun.

Happy Hiking.

Last edited by Longbyt; 19.07.2010 at 19:03. Reason: Added link to Split Thread
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Longbyt for this useful post:
  #65  
Old 03.07.2010, 10:33
olygirl's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: d' Innerschwiiz
Posts: 5,062
Groaned at 225 Times in 148 Posts
Thanked 10,872 Times in 3,321 Posts
olygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Gr.Mythen SZ - safety - novices+children [Split from Thread "Hiking in Switzerlan

I would also like to add another popular and beautiful hike in our area is on the Stoos.

There is a "Gratwanderung" (a crest trail) that connects the Fronalpstock and Klingenstock peaks. It's a gorgeous trail, perhaps easier to do with smaller children and you can use the chairlifts to take you up to the peaks.

A word of caution about this trail: There is no water available along the trail so make sure you carry enough with you.

There's a faucet available at the Klingenstock chairlift and a beautiful restaurant with a gorgeous view on the Fronalpstock but no watering holes in between.
__________________
“We don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are.”
Anais Nin
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank olygirl for this useful post:
  #66  
Old 04.07.2010, 19:36
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
You guys had better make sure you are speaking the same language before you set out together. And I don't mean that you should both be speaking English.
I realize the mistake, madam. So, for people speaking our language I have started a new thread called Alpine hiking (it has more serious stuff ); hopefully this should minimize misunderstandings.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 23.07.2010, 21:11
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

And just when we thought we had heard it all (the safety discussions I was posting a few pages ago), here's another risk that hikers need to be aware of, especially those that do the so-called safer hikes in the T1-T2 grades: aggressive cows (possibly xenophobic to boot )
Ok, it is a bit tongue in cheek, but I think aggressive cows are indeed a serious enough risk to be taken due cognizance of.

For those who can't be bothered to use google translator:

It seems it is a relatively new phenomenon, arising in the last few years due to changed animal husbandry practices. I have had a few close calls on the "safer" hills myself, so I can vouch for it, these cows are nothing like what I know and grew up seeing, cows are supposed to be among the most harmless creatures. So what to do when faced with aggressive cows? I don't know, SAC has yet to come up with a bovine risk grading and alpine cow training courses, until then maybe these commonsensical tips work:

  1. Stay clear of cow territory when they are with a family i.e. accompanied by calves, that is when they become especially touchy about things (but I have seen a few being aggressive even without, maybe it was just one of those days for them )
  2. If that is impossible, and you do need to go through their territory e.g. there are cases when the detour is simply too long, or involves climbing, plan an escape route suitable to your fitness level, always keep an eye on where you are going to bolt if need be.
  3. I haven't been able to test this, but it might be possible to outrun a cow on steep uphills and escape. You could also jump over or crawl under the fences (they can give a current shock, but it won't kill you); the cows, even if they are physically capable of, don't normally jump over fences, it is their mental block.
  4. If these two methods don't suit you, you can try the method prescribed in the link above: raise your hiking poles and make threatening movements. Maybe you can add suitable sounds for more effect, hopefully they will take you seriously.
  5. if all else fails, call Rega

Ok, I simply wanted to say cows and dogs are serious threats to hikers, possibly they are under-rated, just be aware and enjoy the hikes.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 26.07.2010, 23:11
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

An article in the Rega magazine for June gives the following information and tips about animals which a hiker will probably come across on his walks..

There has been an increase in incidents between cows and hikers in recent times. This is partially due to the cows grazing with their calves in the meadows. The cows protect their young and the herd instinct has become more pronounced. Also, because the cows do not come into contact with the herdsmen twice a day for milking, they are no longer as used to human contact as they were a few years ago.
Dogs are also used to protect flocks of sheep and goats against wolves and bears. Often hikers do not know how to act when the dog protects his territory.

What should a hiker do?

Follow the instructions and advice of farmers and alp herdsmen
Before going across meadows, read the Information Boards
Crossing meadows, do not stray from the hiking path
Watch out for signs of aggression in the animals: Lowering their heads, scraping the ground or bellowing.
At a great enough distance from the animals (20 to 50 Metres) go past them, quietly and without attracting attention
Under no circumstances should you touch calves
Keep your dog on the leash
Do not frighten the animals and do not look them straight in the eye
If the animals approach you, stay calm, do not turn your back on them and leave the meadow slowly
Do not wave a stick about

If the animals react unpredictably:
Keep calm
If an animal attacks, let your dog off the lead
As a last resort, strike the cow with a stick – a well-directed blow on the nose
Let the alp herdsman or farmer know of the occurrence
If necessary, administer first aid and alarm the Rega (Tel.1414)
Inform the local BUL (Department of Incidents and Accidents)
Heinz Feldmann – Safety Expert at the Advice Centre for the Prevention of Accidents in Agriculture
__________________
Longbyt
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 27.07.2010, 11:18
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

My point 4 and 5 were in jest, i don't think any adult will try to make "suitably threatening sounds", it will be hilarious to hear one . But I have some comments on Rega's advice too: my comments marked in red
Quote:
View Post
An article in the Rega magazine for June gives the following information and tips about animals which a hiker will probably come across on his walks..

There has been an increase in incidents between cows and hikers in recent times. This is partially due to the cows grazing with their calves in the meadows. The cows protect their young and the herd instinct has become more pronounced. Also, because the cows do not come into contact with the herdsmen twice a day for milking, they are no longer as used to human contact as they were a few years ago.
Dogs are also used to protect flocks of sheep and goats against wolves and bears. Often hikers do not know how to act when the dog protects his territory.
Actually I once encountered this situation while hiking down the Vitznau trail of Rigi: a barking dog and a herd of stampeding cows charging at me or so I thought, I scampered up the short hill and turned back; fortunately they weren't interested in me, the dog was just doing his job of herding the cattle to where they were supposed to go. Whew! close call.

What should a hiker do?

Follow the instructions and advice of farmers and alp herdsmen
Before going across meadows, read the Information Boards

Crossing meadows, do not stray from the hiking path

This is simply dangerous advice. The problem is precisely that currently many hiking paths are officially crossing cow territory, that is what is causing most problems (I think); people that intentionally stray from the marked paths are usually the fitter, more experienced hikers who can generally take care of themselves. Please use your eyes, nose and ears and proactively look out for animals. Often it is safer to stray from the hiking path and walk around.

My method (I had to do this on a regular basis when I lived in Zug and used to run the Zugerberg regularly, crossing sheep and cow territory, occasionally horse territory): keep yourself mid-way between the animal and the fence, so that, if required you can bolt and cross the fence; a cow can't run twice as fast as you, so this much headstart is usually adequate.


Watch out for signs of aggression in the animals: Lowering their heads, scraping the ground or bellowing.

At a great enough distance from the animals (20 to 50 Metres) go past them, quietly and without attracting attention
Under no circumstances should you touch calves
Keep your dog on the leash
Do not frighten the animals and do not look them straight in the eye
If the animals approach you, stay calm, do not turn your back on them and leave the meadow slowly
Do not wave a stick about

If the animals react unpredictably:
Assuming as a city-bred hiker I know what is "predictable behavior" expected of a cow in the first place

Keep calm

Excellent advice so I must remember to stay calm, prevent the rush of adrenaline and curb the bolting instinct that kicks in when an animal 5-10 times your weight comes toward you, eh?

If an animal attacks, let your dog off the lead
As a last resort, strike the cow with a stick – a well-directed blow on the nose
How about on the eye
Ok, I don't have first hand experience of this, but from what bull-fighting I have seen in movies, I would say I am reasonably sure I wouldn't have the reflexes and skill to aim my blow on a charging bovine's nose, it requires close to matador skills to accomplish that.

Hey, why isn't anyone suggesting just run for your life or climb a tree as a last resort, isn't that simpler I don't see Rega recommending that

Let the alp herdsman or farmer know of the occurrence

If necessary, administer first aid and alarm the Rega (Tel.1414)
Inform the local BUL (Department of Incidents and Accidents)
Heinz Feldmann – Safety Expert at the Advice Centre for the Prevention of Accidents in Agriculture
Another good reason to stick to Alpine hiking (T4 and above) there you only have to deal with marmots and mountain goats, and in my limited experience so far, they are a lot more decent than moody cows.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 27.07.2010, 12:21
dodgyken's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Democratic Republic Kenistan
Posts: 9,832
Groaned at 340 Times in 276 Posts
Thanked 17,482 Times in 6,679 Posts
dodgyken has a reputation beyond reputedodgyken has a reputation beyond reputedodgyken has a reputation beyond reputedodgyken has a reputation beyond reputedodgyken has a reputation beyond reputedodgyken has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Went out for a run on Sunday morning - thought we would try a new route - so up the hill - then down towards Weesen. First up was the overnight rain had turned the path to mud - which when going downhill was very much like running in deep snow - IE foot down - slide a bit - next foot down.

Through a couple of fields until the path disappeared into a copse. The path was chocker with cows - who wisely had taken shelter from the previous nights precipitation. Not wanting to take on the herd we had to dive off the path through 1m high brambles and nettles. Our lower legs are looking pretty messy at the moment!

A bit further down the stream was in full flow - requiring a mighty leap across to avoid any foot/moisture issues.

It was all downhill (but in a good way) until we got to Betlis - where it went uphill - physicall - but downhill mentally!
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank dodgyken for this useful post:
  #71  
Old 27.07.2010, 17:11
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
An article in the Rega magazine for June gives the following information and tips about animals which a hiker will probably come across on his walks..

Dogs are also used to protect flocks of sheep and goats against wolves and bears.
BTW does anyone have population figures for wolves and bears in the Swiss Alps? If farmers consider them a large enough threat to warrant measures to protect their cows, as I hiker maybe I should give it some serious thought too

Do you have a link to the magazine article that you can share?
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 28.08.2010, 17:26
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

There are lots of 'wintersports' posts about Engelberg on the Forum and quite a few 'Day Trips/Free Time' ones. This is understandable enough as there are lots of things to do there for the whole family. It's a great hiking area too though, hence this post. As the Engelberg Homepage has an English option it's a good place for getting information easily for someone who hasn't had a lot of time to find their way around.

We recently did the Walenpfad which was great. The views are terrific and the hiking is not difficult. At the bottom of the Walenpfad page the 'round trip ticket' is shown. Makes planning much easier. DO check the bus timetable from Oberrickenbach to Wolfenschiessen though. The buses run for the school children and the work-force by the look of it. Not really for the tourists.

Description of our hike, plus photos, is here. Have fun.
__________________
Longbyt
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 17.09.2010, 16:28
cjc cjc is offline
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: geneva
Posts: 12
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
cjc has no particular reputation at present
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

I am looking for people to Hike with so please PM me if you are interested and from the Geneva area, thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 17.09.2010, 21:38
RetiredInNH's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 2,196
Groaned at 13 Times in 5 Posts
Thanked 1,410 Times in 710 Posts
Blog Entries: 13
RetiredInNH has a reputation beyond reputeRetiredInNH has a reputation beyond reputeRetiredInNH has a reputation beyond reputeRetiredInNH has a reputation beyond reputeRetiredInNH has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

It would help a lot if you mentioned the type of hike you are interested in, preferably with numbers for distance and elevation gain, and a few words about the technical difficulty you are comfortable with.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank RetiredInNH for this useful post:
  #75  
Old 17.09.2010, 21:53
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
It would help a lot if you mentioned the type of hike you are interested in, preferably with numbers for distance and elevation gain, and a few words about the technical difficulty you are comfortable with.
He/she is the first and only person in the whole forum to express genuine interest in Alpine hiking with me, he said my last reported T5 hike fits his requirements
So allow me to wean him away from this place
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 17.09.2010, 21:56
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Ok guys, off you go and have fun. Use the bit of time left to you. Snow is round the corner and then conditions change a lot.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 17.09.2010, 22:01
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Ok guys, off you go and have fun. Use the bit of time left to you. Snow is round the corner and then conditions change a lot.
Are you a mind reader

This thought gives me nightmares, I am not a skier and I have to find some decent options soon if I have to stay sane in the winter.

And my battle with cold hands in winter begins all over again
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 17.09.2010, 22:05
Eire's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tir na nÓg
Posts: 3,639
Groaned at 55 Times in 36 Posts
Thanked 2,366 Times in 1,199 Posts
Eire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond reputeEire has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Are you a mind reader

This thought gives me nightmares, I am not a skier and I have to find some decent options soon if I have to stay sane in the winter.

And my battle with cold hands in winter begins all over again
Thought you were going to learn how to ski this year!
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 17.09.2010, 22:11
Longbyt's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: ZH
Posts: 7,308
Groaned at 55 Times in 51 Posts
Thanked 10,914 Times in 4,090 Posts
Longbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond reputeLongbyt has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
And my battle with cold hands in winter begins all over again
Seriously, do you wear 'pulse warmers', woollen cuffs which go round the wrist? For me, gloves alone often leave me with freezing cold hands, but if I wear pulse warmers on the wrist, I have far fewer problems.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Longbyt for this useful post:
  #80  
Old 17.09.2010, 22:19
Niranjan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Hiking in Switzerland

Quote:
View Post
Seriously, do you wear 'pulse warmers', woollen cuffs which go round the wrist? For me, gloves alone often leave me with freezing cold hands, but if I wear pulse warmers on the wrist, I have far fewer problems.
Everyone knows that the head loses maximum heat, so needs to be kept warm, but I read this somewhere just a few days back, it seems the wrist is nearly as important to keep warm but most people neglect it... Good point.

Last edited by Niranjan; 17.09.2010 at 23:06. Reason: Removed part not relevant to hikers ;-)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hikes, sticky thread, walking




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gr.Mythen SZ-safety - novices+children[Split from Thread "Hiking in Switzerland"] Longbyt Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 19 21.05.2013 14:34
Tennis / Hiking / Swimming in Switzerland Longbyt Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 0 16.01.2011 19:22
Winter Hiking in switzerland paulthed Sports / Fitness / Beauty / Wellness 4 25.11.2009 12:26
Hiking around Zug..maybe start a Hiking Club? Halfasleep Social events 3 02.08.2009 23:10
where to go hiking when pregnant? justsally Travel/day trips/free time 11 07.09.2008 17:00


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 18:13.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0