Thread: Skirt steak?
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Old 19.02.2011, 18:21
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Re: Skirt steak?

The following is copied from a site that came up on a Google search, which may be of help:

Are Flank Steak & Skirt Steak Identical Cuts? Are flank steak and skirt steak the same cut of meat?


No, but they come from the same general area of the cow — the flank or area between the ribs and hip.
The skirt steak is the diaphragm muscle. It is a long, flat piece of meat, with a tendency toward toughness. But it has good flavor. It can be grilled or pan fried quickly with good results. Another traditional method is to stuff it, roll it, and braise it. In many areas of the country (Texas, for example) skirt steak is the only cut to be used when making "real" fajitas.
The flank steak is the traditional cut used for London Broil. It is long, thin, and full of tough connective tissue. It is usually marinated before being broiled or grilled whole. Because it is tough, you usually slice it thinly on a diagonal across the grain to sever the tough fibers and make the flavorful steak chewable.

EDIT: a bit more dictionary looking and googling, led to this:

http://www.chefkoch.de/forum/2,57,42...-vom-Rind.html

Possibly this could be the term?:

"Kronfleisch"

EDIT 2: Maybe not the above - another link (Zwerchfell is Deutsch for diaphragm):

http://www.fleisch-shop.de/index.php?cat=c6_Rind.html

now gives:

"Saumfleisch"

EDIT 3: Take care when getting a dictionary translation for diaphragm, or the butcher may re-direct you to a gynaecologist.

Last edited by TiMow; 19.02.2011 at 19:23.
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