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Old 27.04.2012, 10:58
crazygringo crazygringo is offline
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Re: Foreign Children in Swiss Public Schools

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As Bern is a bilingual canton I'd be glad they could express themselves in French or German. I never would expect them to speak Bärndütsch. Don't get me wrong I don't have anything against foreigners. But I deal with people who have been living here for ten and more years and don't understand anything. I have lived abroad myself and know that life in a foreign country can be difficult, even more if you can't understand the locals. But come on, ten years in country without one single word of German or French?
I don't disagree at all. keep in mind, though, that learning German for many "foreigners" is an intensive investment of time (and often money) in learning a language that they will rarely ever hear. and neither German nor Swiss German (no offense to anybody) are especially portable languages in terms of job opportunities outside of Switzerland (unless someone is angling for work in Germany or Austria, of course).

from my view, I can't understand how anybody could live here beyond the 90-day tourist visa period without understanding at least the basics in the local language. of course, I also study both German and Swiss German in my "free time" and speak as much Swiss German publicly as people will suffer, and realize that peoples' definition of "the basics" can vary wildly (as can reception of people to imperfect German or Swiss German) - so I'm sympathetic to folks who decide to cocoon in their enclaves instead of really engage.

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