View Single Post
  #8  
Old 16.12.2014, 11:58
amogles's Avatar
amogles amogles is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,572
Groaned at 284 Times in 232 Posts
Thanked 24,693 Times in 10,434 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Pegida marches against Islamisation of Europe

Quote:
View Post
The main issue is the economy; when the economy is flourishing in a country, people do not mind the low paying jobs being taken by immigrants; jobs they would not touch themselves. In recession, however, when companies start laying off workers, people start looking around to blame others.

Since 2008, US and EU have never been out of economic hardship. Stock indices went up but a lot of white collar employees dropped out of workforce for good when certain positions/jobs disappeared

So, I do not think it is the islamisation they are afraid of.. but rather deteriorating economic conditions
I disagree. Maybe in a recession, you get more of a "nothing to lose" mindset so people become more radical in expressing their ideas, and this is what we are seeing across Europe. But the ideas themselves are not caused by the recession. In times of prosperity, people who want change on the right might try to achieve that from within the CDU, or within the Tory party or even within a partly like SVP that has a restrained and a radical branch and a grey patch in between and those in that patch can benefit from the ambiguity as to which of the branches they really adhere to. After all, people don't want to rock the boat too hard or stick their necks out needlessly, maybe risking their future career chances.

But when things turn sour and those career chances are gone anway, they are emboldended to burn burn bridges and support less ambiguous movements.
Reply With Quote