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Old 17.04.2018, 15:10
doropfiz doropfiz is offline
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Re: Kindergarten teacher does not take nut allergy serious

My sample size in Switzerland is also only one; a person with an allergy to a specific fruit. As in: went into the whole terrifying process right before our eyes, but fortunately had her medication there and could teach those around what to do.

Aside, not intended to derail OP's threat: I have wondered, too, why allergies seem to be known in some geographical areas, and not in others. Seems odd. Could it be to do with the way foods are cultivated? Or with genetics?

As Odile said, unfortunately "allergy" is a terribly over-used word, sweepingly including the range from "I don't like the taste" to "Too much of this gives me an upset stomach" through sensitivity and intolerance, and this weakens the impact.

Other words have suffered this fate, too, such as "'flu" (for any two-day cold), "trauma" (for anything that makes one feel briefly unhappy), and "migraine" (for any headache). I once heard someone use all three in the same sentence: "Seit gestern habe ich eine Grippe, heute noch eine Migräne, und wenn ich nicht jetzt sofort im Wald joggen gehe, kriege ich eine Trauma." (I've had flu since yesterday, today I also have a migraine, and if I don't go for a run in the forest immediately, I'll be traumatised.)

Sometimes the significance can be re-claimed by using other vocabulary. I know someone with MS who, when not taken seriously ("Oh, yes, that makes one feel tired sometimes, doesn't it?") while needing to get the point across in order to achieve something he can't do without, says he has "partial brain damage related to a life-threatening auto-immune disease", and that usually gets people to focus sufficiently.

Perhaps you can ask your doctor to use the corresponding type of sentence in his letter to the school.
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