View Single Post
  #12923  
Old 08.08.2018, 17:59
amogles's Avatar
amogles amogles is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 11,016
Groaned at 240 Times in 203 Posts
Thanked 23,124 Times in 9,826 Posts
amogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond reputeamogles has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
View Post
I doubt that UK waved goodbye to its problems, maybe to some rather marginal ones. I also doubt they will be left with a blank sheet, exactly because some of the problems cannot vanish overnight.

However, if we're talking about long term consequences, I might agree with you. But who would risk changing some things people will never agree to change...the famous welfare system for instance?
I think you need to agree the big picture things first. Do we want a generous and free welfare and healthcare system? I think most people do, even those who criticize the details do approve the overall concept. Then as a second step we need to sit down and work out how to ensure we can keep that concept and make it better. That is the secondary discussion.

Too many of these discussions, however, put the horse before the cart and let secondary discussions prejudice primary ones.

Quote:
View Post
From my point of view it's admirable they will get to decide their own fate but only that option without any reform within UK will mean lost opportunities.
There will need to be reform in the UK. The UK has a huge backlog on reform. And I think that without the EU on your back telling you, you can't do this and you must do that, you have a far wider range of options open to you. But for that to work, many more people, including those who opposed Brexit, need to swallow their pride and come forward and take part in that discussion and table innovative proposals. They are achieving nothing by slamming the door on that discussion because they are still so sad and angry that they lost. Now is the time for that discussion. Further down the road, when much more is set in stone, it is much more difficult to come back and change things.

Quote:
View Post
As I said, I doubt people are willing to change that much and that fast. Macron has a hard time in France exactly because he wants to change some things. It's also admirable that he starts the change from within and plans to rock the boat across EU too. Of course, we shall see which countries will support him.
I'm not actually convinced that what Macron is doing is leading anywhere. But let's wait and see and give him a chance. We live in exciting times.
Reply With Quote