View Single Post
  #63  
Old 23.10.2018, 11:34
Medea Fleecestealer's Avatar
Medea Fleecestealer Medea Fleecestealer is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 20,559
Groaned at 355 Times in 270 Posts
Thanked 15,001 Times in 8,621 Posts
Medea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond reputeMedea Fleecestealer has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Interesting new approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS)

Multiple sclerosis: Swiss researchers discover a revolutionary treatment
By RaphaŽlle de Tappie

Swiss researchers have succeeded in developing an effective treatment to combat the progression of multiple sclerosis without any side effects.

This could change the lives of the 2.3 million people with multiple sclerosis around the world. Swiss researchers have succeeded in developing an effective treatment to combat the progression of the disease without any adverse side effects, according to a study published on Wednesday, October 10 in the journal Science Transnational Medicine.

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the entire central nervous system and most often appears around the age of 30. A dysfunction of the immune system leads to lesions that then cause motor, sensory and cognitive disturbances. In the more or less long term, these disorders sometimes progress towards an irreversible disability.

For years, scientists have been searching for an infectious cause of this disease that would cause a disruption of the immune system and start attacking myelin sheaths rather than pathogens. But for the first time, Professors Mireia Sospedra and Roland Martin of the University of the Clinical Research Centre for Multiple Sclerosis in Zurich wanted to focus on the immune cells responsible for the disease process.

These react to a protein called GDP-L-fucose synthase, an enzyme formed in a bacterium frequently found in the intestinal flora of patients with multiple sclerosis. "We believe that immune cells are activated in the gut and then migrate to the brain where they cause an inflammatory cascade when they meet the human variant of their target antigen," explains Mireia Sospedra.

A radically different approach to the treatments currently available

She and her colleagues collected blood from a group of volunteers with multiple sclerosis. They then attached fragments of an immunoactive protein to the surface of blood cells in the laboratory. Once the blood was reintroduced into patients' vessels, the fragments helped them to rebuild their immune systems. And, this, without any deplorable side effects, unlike the treatments currently available for multiple sclerosis, the researchers are pleased with. "Our clinical approach specifically targets pathological self-reactive immune cells," notes Mireia Sospedra. This approach is therefore radically different from other treatments that asphyxiate the entire immune system.

Thus, the intestinal microbiota could play a greater role in the pathogenicity of the disease than previously thought, conclude the researchers, who hope, in the long run, to be able to apply their findings to treatment. Because if existing treatments are successful in reducing disease outbreaks, they are struggling to control the progression of the disease. In addition, the side effects are very painful for patients.

Corticosteroids, such as oral prednisone and intravenous methylprednisolone, often prescribed to reduce inflammation and reduce the duration of relapses, tend to cause insomnia, increased blood pressure, increased water retention or osteoporosis. As for the introduction of disease-modifying immunomodulators that reduce the frequency of relapses by 30%, it is known to cause a "flu-like" syndrome that can manifest itself in muscle pain, fever, chills and a feeling of weakness. Skin reactions also occur a few hours after injection during the first three months of treatment. Finally, an attack of the liver (reversible) sometimes occurs but it is generally benign.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

Looks promising, let's hope further research/testing confirms their findings.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Medea Fleecestealer for this useful post: