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Old 12.07.2019, 09:47
greenmount greenmount is offline
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Re: Happy - are you?

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I agree that bitter comparisons can make one unhappy. But occasionally they can inspire... like when one admires a teacher or a top-class sportsperson or musician, and the comparison ("My tennis serve is a trillion times worse than Federer's.") can motivate an amateur tennis-player to watch and replay videos of Federer, and try out his moves, to become more like him.

The same thing can happen at Toastmasters or in good working environments, where one can be stunned by the ease with which someone mastered a topic or a situation, admire that in them, seek to learn and emulate, and then feel happy when it suddenly becomes clear that - thanks to the honest comparison and some hard work - one has been able to progress, and do things better.
I was thinking the same. Looking at others and comparing myself with them did help me get my head on straight in a couple of occasions and reevaluate my patterns and saw what I did wrong or what I didn't do enough. I am (mildly) competitive but don't envy anyone, I try to understand where I stand in certain circumstances in order to improve what can be improved and inspire myself from other patterns that proved to be more successful.
Envy is a very bitter sentiment, yuk, I don't like it. I am usually pleased for those folks who succeeded by hard work and determination. Also, I think comparing oneself with movies stars or other public personalities is more of a teenage/very young people thing.
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