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Old 07.03.2020, 22:43
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Re: The Brexit referendum thread: potential consequences for GB, EU and the Brits in

Quote:
The UK is to withdraw from the European Union aviation safety regulator (EASA) after the Brexit transition period, Grant Shapps has confirmed.

The transport secretary said many of the most senior figures at the organisation headquartered in Cologne, Germany were British and that they would gradually return to the UK throughout this year as regulatory powers reverted to the Civil Aviation Authority.
Source

Wonder if the Brits have agreed to return?

Quote:
Before a newly developed aircraft model may enter into operation, it must obtain a type certificate from the responsible aviation regulatory authority. Since 2003, EASA is responsible for the certification of aircraft in the EU and for some European non-EU Countries. This certificate testifies that the type of aircraft meets the safety requirements set by the European Union.
Seems a strange idea?
Currently, I believe, no complete aircraft are built in the UK just parts.
Is it planned to issue new type and other certificates for all foreign aircraft entering the UK and/or being repaired and maintained, if so, that would take years of testing and cost a fortune?
The Boeing 737Max being a current case?

Currently, only the EU has suitable testing facilities so would UK contract testing to the EU?

The UK aerospace industry has estimated that it would take a decade and cost between £30m and £40m a year to create a UK safety authority with all the expertise of EASA, against a current contribution to the European agency of £1m to £4m annually.

There is an EU paper on this.
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