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Old 12.09.2020, 04:28
Urs Max Urs Max is offline
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Re: Maintaining small house & living in the lower mountains questions

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At the risk of looking very stupid, could you please explain why you do this. Thanks.
I can't speak for sgb but here's what I know.

Fuel contains water. At the pump the amount is usually negligible but it can increase over time. The most common reason for this is condensation (a significant problem on the waters), the bigger the difference between the day's high and low, and the higher the relative humidity during the cold hours, the more likely condensation is to occur.

When the water content is high enough and the temperatures low enough, the water contained will separate from the actual fuel and flow to the deepest point in the tank. There's reserve space at the tank bottom for this very reason, but the reserve capacity is finite and if there's enough of it (or the tank shaken hard enough, think of an enduro bike doing trails if you will) the condense water may flow out the ordinary outlet and stop the motor from working and/or cause corrosion inside.

The outlet is probably connected to the carburator or fuel pump by a hose. After emptying the tank the hose will usually be disconnected at the carburator end and bent in a manner that whatever flows out bypasses the motor block and drops directly to the floor. That's the reason for the cardboard, it keeps the fuel-y oily water from staining the floor.

Last edited by Urs Max; 12.09.2020 at 04:39.
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