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Old 11.11.2020, 23:44
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Re: Where To Buy Swiss Chard

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Thank you all. However isnít Swiss chard red stalks with green leaves. Both of these look like Bok Choy or cabbage which is not Swiss chard
It is not Bok Choi (Maybe the picture is)

Here a translation of the Migros page

Krautstiel

The Krautstiel enjoys a reputation abroad as a typical Swiss delicacy. The English, for example, call the vegetable Swiss chard and the Swiss call it Mangold. Which is of course not quite correct. Of the two chard cultivars, Blattmangold (Leaf chard) and Stielmangold (stem chard), only the latter has been enjoyed as a Krautstiel since the 16th century. We [the Swiss] love it in the form of green, red or yellow stems, all of which taste like asparagus and are often eaten like it. This is why it used to be called "poor man's asparagus", just like black salsify. Krautstiel tastes good as a gratin and as a vegetable garnish with meat and fish. The leaves can be prepared and combined like spinach.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version) and by aSwissInTheUS.


The Blattmangold a.k.a Schnittmangold is used for Capuns or just like spinach
https://migusto.migros.ch/de/tipps-u...ttmangold.html
https://www.swissmilk.ch/de/rezepte-...chnittmangold/
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