View Single Post
  #23  
Old 28.11.2020, 00:57
Sky's Avatar
Sky Sky is offline
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Somewhere special far away
Posts: 4,171
Groaned at 60 Times in 43 Posts
Thanked 6,581 Times in 2,479 Posts
Sky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond reputeSky has a reputation beyond repute
Re: "Your German is not good enough..."

Quote:
View Post
I am also perpetually frustrated at how intolerant my francophone friends are with my French. Sometimes people I meet for the first time tell me that I speak with such a good accent it's only well into the conversation when they realize I'm not a native speaker. But my good friends have no shame in correcting my often not-quite-correct vowel sounds. "Bossie, it's not an e, it's an eeeuh." Or gender: "It's not un répétiton, it's une répétition. Seriously, to-may-to, to-mah-to. I'm a North American married to Brit and we have developed our own hybrid accent in the household. I have a pretty liberal attitude towards how many acceptable ways there are to pronounce vowels.

I work in English with almost exclusively non-native speakers with a large variety of accents and fluency, and some of the pronunciations I hear are interesting, but I always understand them and NEVER correct anyone unless they are so far off people might think they mean something else. I also don't care at all that they don't speak English perfectly.
Many expats are very accepting of non-native English speakers when they struggle with English. Agreed.
But would those non-native English speakers find the same level of acceptance if they were in the US or the UK?
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Sky for this useful post: