Thread: Ask a Scientist
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Old 30.12.2020, 16:16
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Symmetry is a big deal in physics. There are 2 major "branches" or meanings of symmetry. One is the traditional physics symmetry understanding, that describes a system's property which remains unchanged after a given transformation (e.g. Lorenz symmetry in regards to conservation of energy or momentum, or discrete symmetry in regards to charge or time parity). The other is the layman's understanding of symmetry, when applicable to the Standard Model (somehow covered by the so-called Suppersymmetry): this states (in simple terms) that all bosons or fermions have a "partner" particle in the other group.
Thanks. I guess the symmetry in bio development is interesting to me because it's not theoretical and there are other aspects
- desirability, economical point, sustainability, self repair, etc. I don't think you can just take the numbers and put them into teoretical physics formula? Every cell has it. There seems to be an independent principle, that living world differs from the world that isn't alive. It will probably be explored by science of gmo.
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