Thread: Ask a Scientist
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Old 13.01.2021, 15:24
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Re: Ask a Scientist

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Many phenomena aren't independent of scale, it just appears like that because the average human only sees a limited range of scales.

Your example of oscillation isn't a good one - "oscillation" just means stuff changing between states periodically, the underlying scientific cause may be radically different.

Laws of science may cease to work at very small scales - a standard undergraduate problem when comparing classical laws with quantum mechanics etc.

Or at "larger" scales, for example the strong nuclear force has a clear maximum range beyond which it is not effective, it is bound within that range.
In all of these cases laws do not cease to function.

Rather there are effects that for practical purposes we can safely ignore in certain cases because they are totally insignificant. But they still exist.

There is a big difference between saying, say, "an architect can safely ignore the curvature of the earth because any effects thereof will be well within the margin of error relevant to the construction business", and say, "all architects are flat-earthers, and so she everybody else be who isn't a pilot or a navigator".
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