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Old 29.01.2007, 13:09
Kittster Kittster is offline
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Re: New to Skiing - the nightmare

My stepfather, who is from an Asian country and had not seen snow until he was, I think, 28, started to learn to ski a few years after arriving here and is still a bit wobbly but manages to get down most hills without falling over. He only goes one week a year though so that's not unusual.

To be honest, if you are relatively fit and have a good sense of balance, snowboarding is much faster to learn and the equipment is less painful. However, you can have much more annoying injuries with the snowboard.

Skiing is maybe more "elegant" and once you've mastered the basics, you stay up at all times, unlike snowboarding where the occasional sitting down is not really to be avoided. Injury-wise, the skis are meant to jump off if under to much pressure so twisted knees are usually avoided but you have to have the fittings at the right level.

I started skiing myself when I was three and had a brief stint with snowboarding. After harming my knee quite badly, I decided I was more of a skier. But I've started to be a little scared so my style is ruined. Plus I prefer the old-fashioned type of skis, affectionately called "pommes frites ski".

And not to forget, the most challenging type of skiing ever if you go by the price of the equipment of its most avid followers: The Après Ski.

There are lots of ways of getting down the hill, Big Foot, Telemark, Monoski, Snowbike - try one of the "Plausch Tag" a lot of skiing areas offer to see what you like best.
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