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Old 08.04.2021, 17:36
meloncollie meloncollie is offline
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Re: Dog boarding and grooming

I'm afraid I can't recommend a boarding kennel in your area, but as to your other questions, from my rather extensive search:

I have found that more places now seem to require the nasal KC vax, the usual KC included in the combi vax is not accepted. This is not universal, so do check with the Tierheim you are considering to find out exactly which vaccinations are required. And be prepared to bring along your dog's passport with proof of vaccination.

Prices seem to be all over the board. In my rather extensive search, I have seen kennels charging from CHF 30 to CHF 250 per dog per day.

It seems to be getting more common to charge separately for each service offered. Typically there is a basic charge for the kennel, then services such as walks, training, playtime, grooming, giving medicine, special food preparation requirements, are all charged separately. You choose which services your dog should receive and pay accordingly. Most Tierheim will have prices listed on their websites. Be aware that many will charge a heating fee during winter months.

Typically a single kennel accomodation will be more expensive than sharing with another dog, and these get booked out quickly.

As with price, quality varies widely. I've found a few Pension that are are quite good, most seemed OK, a few I saw were horrid. You will need to do due diligence.

Does your dog have any 'special needs'? If so, finding a Pension who can accomodate that can be difficult.

Some things that might surprise you, coming from other countries:

Many Tierheim do not staff overnight, the dogs are left alone from early evening through early morning, about 12 hours in total. Some have monitors in the kennels with a staff member occasionally checking in, others do not.

Some Tierheim are not able to administer medicine.

Many Tierheim will take your dog to a vet in an emergency, but some cannot. Instead you are asked to leave the contact info of someone local who can come and pick your dog up if he becomes ill. Make sure you cover all the 'what ifs' in your discussions with the staff. Discuss POA for medical decisions during your dog's stay at the Tierheim, including euthanasia.

Some Tierheim will require a trial stay, some more than one.

Many Tierheim do not take any liabllity for your dog during his stay with them, rather the liability remains with you. Check with your insurer to make sure you are covered for this. Typically your Privathaftpflicht policy includes times when your dog is in the care of a third party, but that the Tierheim is professional can muddy the waters.

As with everything in Switzerland, read the contract carefully before you commit.

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Another option might be a Hort, a more home-like dog care center.

These typically keep the dogs in 'Rudelhaltung', a group setting, throughout the day. If your dog is well trained and very social with all sorts of other dogs, this might be a good option. Some Hort keep the numbers low, others care for a dozen or more dogs at a time, so your dog really needs to be comfortable with other dogs.

Prices tend to be a bit higher; going from memory of a few years ago something like 75-125 per day. As with Tierheim, additional services are often charged separately.

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You might also look for a private dog sitter. Most take dogs into their homes, so yours has to be able to slot into the particular family dynamics. A very few sitters care for your dog in your home.

Prices again are all over the ball park, I've seen private sitters charging as little as CHF 100 per day, some as much as 500 plus per day. Typical rate seems to be CHF 25 per hour.

One platform to find a private sitter is Petsitting 24; you have to pay a membership fee to contact the sitters but the site allows you limited browsing before joining so you can check availability in your area.

Be aware that few private sitters run their own businesses, most will be working for you as your employee. So figure into the cost social deductions, insurances, as well as the administrative end.

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Be aware that, as always in Switzerland, price is no guarantee of quality. Due diligence!

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There is far more demand for dog care than supply, especially during school holidays. Some places are even booked a year in advance. If you travel during popular times, be sure to make finding dog care a top priority.

Good luck with the search!


ETA:

Most of the Meloncollies were DIY grooming jobs, so the only professional price point I can give was Puddle the Poodle. A simple all-one-length-no-topiary cut was something like CHF 100. Maybe a bit less, going from memory here. I would think grooming price will vary by breed, size, and what one wants done.

Last edited by meloncollie; 08.04.2021 at 23:38.
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