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Old 02.08.2010, 12:06
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Re: Circumcision: right or wrong?

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Yeah true. But at very worst it's a neutral procedure. There is some evidence both for harm and good. So to me, it's a big whatever, unless you're the tree hugger type who thinks the way we're born is perfect. I couldn't care less if I had my appendix removed at the age of 2 because my parents prayed to the God of spleens who has a continual war with the God of appendices. I'm here, I have a little scar, whatever.
Nah . . . I couldn't care less about the purity of the body. It's a bogus notion. After vaccinations, drinking chlorinated water etc our bodies are far from the natural state. One could even argue that clothes and spectacles make us cyborgs.

I guess I'm just slightly on the other side of the line from you as to harm/benefit. I just can't see the benefits. At some point the medical profession decided they didn't need to whip out appendices either. There's really no point sticking with unnecessary practise, just because you can't see the harm.

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And surely Jews should make a decision on dietary laws after a quick chew on some Pata Negra. Nah, can't negotiate with religious doctrine. In any case, you're putting a lot of trust in the objectivity that child will have at 16. Children brought up in orthodoxy will always choose circumcision. Always.
The difference with the dietary restriction is that firstly it only affects yourself . . . my decision to attend a metzgete doesn't affect you. Secondly, parents bringing up their child within a certain dietary practice aren't making an irreversible choice.

I don't think there's much we can do about children following the dogma of their parents and community. However, for some less strict followers of the religion, this would introduce a notion of choice and start a discussion about change. Of course religion is dogmatic, but there's always the possibility of reform.