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  #61  
Old 12.10.2016, 13:57
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Sylv’s various hints and tips on Budgeting

After you calculated your budget of fixed costs, like I tried to explain in another file, let’s see where and how we can try to save a little bit more on the variable costs, such as food and clothes.
I follow my own “rules” as closely as possible, I am not one for preaching water and drinking wine.

Food:
For variable costs such as household /food etc, collect ALL till receipts etc. for about two to three months (no cheating)
You’ll be surprised to see how much money one spends already there.
It is time consuming, I know but it really works and IMHO, wisely done, you can save a lot of money by clever shopping.

Subscribe to the COOP and Migros weekly Newspaper, there you’ll find the weeks special sales announced and you can make your shopping list according to the sales, for the same reason allow advertisements to be delivered to your post-box.

Compare prices!!
ALWAYS make a shopping list and keep to it or even better, make an approximate weeks menu plan before writing the shopping list and consider all the special offers in there.

Shop once a week in bulk instead of daily or every two-day, you’ll be more tempted when you dip frequently into the shops and will buy stuff you don’t really need

Build up a stock of long lasting goods in good times so you can live off that, when there is more month than money left, this stock should include things like;

Pasta, Rice, Flour, Sugar, Various cans of vegetables, pulses and fruits, Salt, dried herbs, Cocoa powder Vinegar, Oil, Mineral water, Honey, Jam, UHT-Milk etc.

A stock like this is also handy when you get unexpected visitors and you can rustle up something to eat from it.

Invest in a good freezer, for the above reasons as well as to freeze leftovers or for pre-cooked meals. E.g. make two lasagnes, one you cook for immediate consumption and the other goes into the freezer BEFORE baking it. Saves time, money and energy.

Try to cook as much as you can from scratch, ready-made meals and convenience foods are overpriced in Switzerland!

Buy fresh products, such as fruits and vegetables, when they are in season. Best on a weekly farmers market, it’s in season and very cheap as well!

If you can, try to grown some stuff on your own and if it is only herbs on your windowsill.

My balcony is ca.7-8sqm and I grow a whole host of vegetables (carrots, cucumber, kohlrabi, fennel, tomatoes, leafy salads, beetroot, welsh onions), 15 different herbs and strawberries....this gardening lark will be covered in many more posts to come

Dry and grind stale bread to get breadcrumbs.
Make your own croutons to scatter on top of salads.
If you have time to, learn to make preserves.

Make new food from leftovers -- for example you could make;
Pasta bake with diced left over meat and vegetables in it.
Finely chop left over veggies and stuff and form ravioli. You don’t need a pasta maker, a rolling pin is sufficient enough and the dough is easily made with 200gr semolina & 2 Eggs .

Grind the left over Sunday roast, mix with onions, herbs and some diced tomatoes and stuff hollowed out vegetables such as tomatoes or zucchini with them, top with a slice of cheese and bake.
Make a Pasta salad with left over meat and / or veggies
Use your imagination and you’ll find ton’s of variations of how to use leftovers, this will also save you loads of money!

All above mentioned hints and tips will also be covered more closely in separate files.


Clothes:

If you have children, I can almost hear you sighing...... Me too, I know too only too well about the amount of clothes that a child can go through, the torn trousers, stained t-shirts etc
In my opinion, children don’t need to be Barbie Dolls and be clad in brands from top to toe!
I might sound naïve to some, but in the region where I live, the pressure on a child TO NEED branded clothes to belong, has not yet arrived.

So for every day use my kids are not dressed in their Sunday best, on contrary. A child should be able to run around, climb trees, play in mud and sandpits, go to trips to the forest with the class etc. WITHOUT the need to remind itself all the time to pay attention to the clothes that they don’t stain, tear etc.
What I want to say is, invest in a few choice items, of better/best (or even branded) quality that you can mix and match for going out, for special occasions etc (we called these the Sunday clothes)

For every day wear, use shop around in H&M, C&A, second hand shops, Brockenhaus, start a clothes exchange with friends who have children of a similar age etc.

Invest in a simple sewing machine, learn to mend clothes and /or alter clothes.
Torn (un-patchable) jeans make good shorts or can be turned into a short skirt for a girl or make a schoolbag even.
A shirt with torn elbows looks also good without sleeves or short sleeves.
Stained, light coloured t-shirts etc. can be coloured in the washing machine to a darker colour and look like new
An A-line cotton skirt of your daughter is too short? Add a frilly ‘extension’ on the seam and it’ll fit again perfectly.

Knitted Jumper is in bits and pieces and not to be mended, wind it up and put the wool away, if you don’t need it for knitting, your child might use it for an art project or similar.
Sleeves of knitted jumpers make good leg warmers for girls in winter for their PE outfit.

Daddy’s sleeveless vests can make a dress for 2- to 4-year-old girls (as seen on pic), dye it in the machine or tie dye with more colours and decorate with beads or so. Did this for my two younger ones, worked very well and they loved those dresses on hot summer days, as they were really comfortable to wear.
[IMG]file:///C:\Users\Sylv\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ image002.jpg[/IMG]
















Mum’s colourful t-shirts that have gone out of fashion can be used the same way for girls.





Shoes:

The same principle as for clothes applies here, partly the other way round.
My kids had some good quality shoes for everyday use, they walked over 1km to and fro school everyday (4km in total), but for going out (see Sunday clothes) each of them has a fancy pair of shoes (colour matches the ‘good’ clothes), not necessarily expensive ones (15.- to 20.- chf. a pair) and the quality is not top of the range, but as they are only worn for short times, I don’t think they’ll damage their feet.
And they have two pair of sandals, one very cheap ones to run around in the garden, sandpit etc and the better quality ones for the daily school run. If you need to replace shoes for running around it won’t cost you an arm and a leg and you always have some ‘good’ ones in the shoe cupboard to use anytime!

©sylv1999-2016



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  #62  
Old 12.10.2016, 14:03
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

If ground beef and tomatos are on sale: prepare that into a sauce, can it and you will always have the ingredients for a bolognese or so in your pantry. Just unloaded 6 jars, waiting to cool down
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  #63  
Old 12.10.2016, 14:09
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Food Portion size per person

If you have to work with a really tight budget, it helps a lot when you roughly know, how much food to calculate person at the table. This also helps to keep the expenses in check and you have much less leftovers (although they can also be turned into yummy meals), as if you just start cooking willy nilly without plan and then have so much leftovers you’ll bin that, because after the 2nd day eating them you have had your fill.

To bin food that is still edible, is a deep deep red rag to me, especially if those leftovers could be turned into another or two yummy meals and thus would stretch further.

I know this list by heart, since I, anno 198something had to use it, at my year long home economics school (Haushaltlehrjahr) and I use it to this day.
It also helped a great deal during the time in the mid-noughties, when I ran my own party service as one-woman-enterprise and occasionally had to calculate for food for up to 60 people. The portion size is calculated for an average grown person. If there are lots of children or many elderly people at the table, you can easily reduce the portion sizes by a little, but if you have a group of teenage lads at the table, it is advisable to calculate for a tad bigger portions than suggested.

I don’t keep to this list to the exact amount in millilitres and milligrams, just approximately, after some time you’ll have the feeling for it without using scales or any other measuring device, yet it is handy to have a list like that to refer to if needed.


SOUPS Entree 2 - 2 ½ dl
Main 4 dl

SAUCES ½ - 1 dl

MEAT on the bone 150 - 200gr
Roasts 150 - 200gr
Stir fry, ground meat,
Ragout, Schnitzel 80 - 120gr


SALAD, unprepared Lettuce, Endives etc 50 -80gr
Lambs salad, Cress 30gr
Other vegetables, raw 100 - 150gr

VEGETABLES, unprepared 150 - 200gr


POTATOES, unprepared Boiled potatoes 150gr
Rösti, mashed, Salad etc 200 - 250gr


RICE, MAIS (CORN), SEMOLINA 50 – 80gr

PASTA Side 50 – 80gr
Main 100 – 120gr

BREAD 100 – 150gr


FRUITS, unprepared raw 100 – 150g
boiled 150 – 200gr

CUSTARDS 1 ½ dl


©sylv1999-2016
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  #64  
Old 12.10.2016, 14:12
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Sylv’s Collected Files

Emergency stock and such stuff


To live on a really tight Budget.... needs day to day a lot more energy and effort (especially to keep ones brain switched ON at all times for the cause), than if you have easily enough money for food and drink, not to mention to afford a lot of other life comforts. There simply is no easy way where one can snap the fingers or click the heels three times to solve the problems.

There are already a few generalised files in here about budgeting in general. In them I write about my very personal experiences, that I made during my life time so far.

I was blessed with many people around me, who shared their experiences with me. Mostly they were the elderly people I looked after during my thirteen years as assistant nurse in retirement homes and hospitals. They were of the generation of ‘Waste not, Want not’ and ‘Don’t throw away anything, which can be mended’. Really interesting stories I was allowed to hear from them, the experiences they shared with me, as many of them were living during WW1 and 2, when food, drink and a lot more stuff were scarce.
All this knowledge I gathered, helped me a great deal when I was a single, working mom for the first time at almost 24.


I admit the joke about the collected files in the title doesn’t sound as funny and ironic as the German “Syuveli’s gesammelte Werke”, yet under this title I want to impart now and then with hopefully a teensy tad witty and interestingly written stuff covering all kinds of things in regards to living on a tight budget.
This may also include some family stories coupled with Swiss customs/traditions and recipes and their backgrounds and a lot of stuff from times long gone. So you’ve been warned!

More importantly want to share this way all the helpful things, that I was allowed to learn and get to know over all the decades and if I can help only one person with it, then I reached my goal.


*****
It is in the media from time to time, the call to make every inhabitant in Switzerland organise and keep an emergency stock for themselves and their family AGAIN.
I am from a generation when this was mandatory, somehow this stuck with me and when I moved out from my parents’ home at 17.

When I wrote this file in Swiss German about 3 years ago, the trigger was an article in the “Scandal Sheet” 20 Minutes. But the funniest things were the letters to the editor from the readers regarding the article. So many were getting hot headed about the idea in general or thinking it is enough to buy the things requested and then forget about them for the next ten years, stored in a cupboard/cellar or attic...as one has bought them, innit?!
I really had to restrain myself to not do a continued face palm after the lecture of the comments. How stupid can one get?? Where has common sense gone??

Such an emergency stock can help a lot, when living on a tight budget too!
The risks that you will have to keep this stock, because Switzerland will be involved in a war situation is minuscule, but consider a lengthy cut in the electricity supply?

Or, what do you think, the people in the villages in the mountains eat, when they are snowed in or an avalanche cuts them off from the rest of the country for some time? Or what is more likely, how does a family survive, when there is once again a bit more month left at the end of the money?

Precisely!

To conserve food and make preserves of all kinds was quite common in the olden days in Switzerland. Especially BEFORE fridges became affordable for Jane and John Public. Fridges as we know them now, have only become affordable after WW2. Before, they were only seen in homes of the monetary very affluent, hotels and hospitals and not at all a common installation in any home.


[IMG]file:///C:\Users\Sylv\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ image002.jpg[/IMG]Fresh foodstuffs such as milk, vegetable and fruits were only shopped for in small amounts, basically just what one could eat up in a short time. Meat was usually only eaten on a Sunday, also because to store the food, most flats of the time only had a so called ‘Gänterli’ (stock cupboard) which was mounted in a corner of the kitchen (area) and whose door often was covered with a mesh-y kind of material and not wood panelled or so, to allow for air to circulate.











And if one had a bit more money, then they could afford a bigger cupboard or even ‘äs Buffett’ (a sideboard).







The bottom part of those bigger food cupboards was usually lined with lead, as this guaranteed a bit of coolness; it was in a way a predecessor of the fridge.
[IMG]file:///C:\Users\Sylv\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ image004.jpg[/IMG]












It was very common in olden days, ok I mean only last century, not that olden the days were. Well, it was common in the apartment blocks that each flat was assigned a cellar compartment and in this cellar there was a wooden so called ‘Hurt’ or ‘Hurde’ (a kind of stock rack). These racks are simply genius for stock keeping and if you got one in your cellar, count yourself lucky. Especially as the customary fitting of the cellars with one such rack has sadly stopped a few decades ago in most newly built apartment blocks.
Usually on the bottom shelf, one stored the spuds and apples, as it was the nearest to the floor, e.g. coolest shelf, but elevated enough from the floor, so that it was not too cold and more importantly not wet/moist and thus the apples and spuds wouldn’t rot or sprout over winter.

[IMG]file:///C:\Users\Sylv\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ image006.jpg[/IMG]














Of course I do know that nowadays the cellar floors are usually made of concrete and not the natural stone floor of the olden days. But one isn’t usually buying 100kilo of spuds either, to get through winter anymore and this rack is IMHO still one of the best fittings for a cellar.

Enough jabbering about the olden days now, back on topic of the emergency stock. Admittedly, if you haven’t assembled one already, it may be a tad expensive at first. But you don’t need to buy it all at once.
Below is the Swiss Government issued List, of what one should consider to have in the emergency supplies per person in a household for one week.

(A week, is the time the Government thinks, they will need in case of war/catastrophe or some such thing to get everything going again and to supply foodstuffs to the public again)

Drinks
9 liters of water (per person)
Fruit and vegetable juices

Durable food (for about 1 week)
Rice or pasta
Oil or fat
Cans e.g. with vegetables, fruit or mushrooms
Tomato sauce in glass jars or Tetrapak
canned meat and fish
Ready meals (storable without fridge)
e.g. Chili con carne, beans, rice dishes, hash browns aka Rösti
Instant soups
Sugar, jam, honey
Bouillon, salt, pepper
Coffee, cocoa, tea
Dried vegetables (green beans, lentils etc.)
Biscuits or crispbread
Chocolate
Condensed milk, UHT milk
Hard cheese (Gruyere, Sbrinz, Mountain Cheese, etc.)
Cured , smoked sausages, dried meat
Special foods (for babies and children, or people with food intolerance)
Food and water for Pets

General stuff
Transistor radio, flashlights with (replacement) batteries
Candles, matches and / or lighter
Gaz containers for camping lamps or camping stoves
Soap, toilet paper, hygiene products

Of course I think many things on this list are either already in stock in any home and there is surely space to store it too....no one says you need three pallets full of stuff!

If one starts to build up slowly an emergency stock, you will not only always have some food around for the reasons listed at the beginning (Reason No.3 is usually the one for me), but simply you will also be able to rustle up a meal out of this, when you were held up at work and the shops are shut or your children invited half the class to lunch without forewarning.

Yes, yes, that is the ‘downside’ of having an open house, but I wouldn’t have wanted it any other way!!

So if you consider,that at the next sale of food stuffs, here and there (not all at once) you buy a bigger pack or more than one item of the canned sweetcorn/pasta/honey/cup a soup/tuna etc etc etc ( you get my drift), than usual, and give the items their designated place in your household/cellar/attic/cupboard, you’ll soon have a good selection of things in the stock.

For single persons, it could be a good idea to share the cost and content the often XXXL packages of canned goods on sale with a friend or family member. So you can still profit of the lower prices without having to cough up lots of money.

Once you’ve established this emergency supply stock, you can start to profit from it.

- Continually replace the items you used from it (Big plus, this way items will never be past
their SBD)
- Out of the contents of it, you can rustle up a simple meal easily, one of those days when
everything goes haywire and you can’t get to a shop in time
- You always ‘have something in the cupboards’
- Once you have assembled the ‘Hardware’, then you mostly will need to buy fresh stuffs
(vegetables, salads, dairy products and cheese, fruit) and thus the weekly shop will also get
cheaper as you only replace the used items from your stock.
- As I said you will also be able to eat something when there is no money left to go shopping
- If you or your child/ren get ill and you can’t get out of the house, you will also be able to
provide some meal without big stress and direct your energy to the patient, instead of
fretting about the shopping.

For me personally, to all this stock keeping malarkey also belongs the Freezer and Non-Food stock keeping, which I manage exactly the same as the one talked about above.

And this is also what I meant that one needs to have their brain and common sense switched on at all times in regards to this.

Before I let myself be lured in by the special sale offers and flyers and what not of the retailers, before I pass the lovely ‘Come buy me, buy MEEEE’ arrangements in the shop.
I take my paper notepad and check the dry stock, freezer and fridge and note down what we really need to shop for...... and keep to the list in the store!!

This way at least the bi-weekly big grocery shop won’t tear an enormous hole into my wallet, this honour goes usually to the tax people and similar robber barons! ;-) ;-)

One thing this life of mine has taught me, is to be really strict with myself and not give in .... at least I try to, but I am only human and may also fail sometimes.

Who put that slice of Sachertorte in the trolley??

I am convinced, supermarkets employ some kind of trolls who, for the fun of it, put items not on your shoppinglist into your trolley. That is most certainly where the word Trolley comes from......Didn’t you know that too??
©sylv1999-2016
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  #65  
Old 12.10.2016, 14:20
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Sigh, between Eastenders amazing budget meals and being told I'm an idiot in another thread because I've somehow been stupid enough not to have saved 40% of my income towards a pension I'm now seriously depressed.

Kidding (not about the pension bit); I'm really enjoying reading Eastenders blog on FB, am in total aware of her abilities and only marvel at how well she and her daughters not only survive but thrive..... and with a sense of humour to boot!!!!
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  #66  
Old 12.10.2016, 17:31
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Sorry to the FB'ers,


I wil just post two of them here, to hopefully entice others from all around the world share their wisdom in regards to cheap food.





Härdöpfu-Louch Suppe u Öpfuchueche, that is the name of the meal in my broad Bernese dialect


Potato and Leek Soup and
Apple Pie
Soup and a fruity pie is also some food I grew up with, simple, cheap and fills the tummy quite well.


It is getting quite chilly in the evenings now and Daughter #2 has started a new job, which requires her to drive 30 Minutes, each way, on the motorway on her 125ccm motor scooter. Despite all the protective gear she is wearing, one gets all the same a bit chilly underneath it all.


IMHO, there is no better way to warm up again, when she comes home from work, than with a plate of hot soup.




Härdöpfu-Louchsuppe
Potato and Leek Soup


600gr Potatoes .-74Cts.
350gr Leeks 1.10.- (didn’t have some from the allotment yet)
2 M-Budget Cervelat 1.90.-
Marjoram, Parsley from the balcony 0.00.-
I won’t calculate in detail for the 2 bouillon/stock cubes, as I buy once a year all three flavours** of the XXL bouillon/stock from Lidl, and once used up, you get a Tupperware like box for
further use .

Oh, and a dash of Cream for coffee (Kaffeerahm) was also added, which I didn’t measure.


Anyway, the cervelat has been diced finely and roasted to be scattered all over the soup and I also made an apple pie (which I now realise I have forgotten to make a pic of)


1 M-Budget short crust pastry 1.20.-
400gr Prix Garantie apples, grated .-95Cts .
2 Eggs .-42Cts.
350ml Milk .-32Cts.


Vanilla flavoured sugar to give it some sweetness, I had my home made one (see Saving Tip),thus it was gratis.



Over all for the soup 3.74.- and for the apple pie 2.89.- , ergo everything added together comes to 6.63.- and makes 2.21.- per lass at the table.
** vegetable, chicken and beef flavours that is
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Old 12.10.2016, 17:36
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

This ties in with the previous post,a couple of days before we had a small party for my youngest who turned 18 recently. From her PAsta Festival we had some left over mushroom sauce.......


Copy from FB Blog:



From 2 make 1 or some such thing





Using up left overs and creating a new-ish dish for 2.10.-.


The cervelats came to 1.90.- and 160gr Rice was .-20Cts.!


1 3/4 left over Cervelat in slices, fried and added to the left over mushroom sauce made for a new-ish dish,which we ate with a bit of rice, made 1.05.- per Person.



Oh, and the remaining quarter of the cervelat, went to a black haired lass on 4 paws who behaved really really well recently, and thus got spoilt with a little goodie.
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Old 12.10.2016, 17:48
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Although cubes of stock are cheap, I'm wary of MSG and prefer natural veggie stock, which just happens to be very easy to make and is basically free.

Take all of your veggie cut-offs- onion and garlic skins, pepper seedy parts, mushroom stem trimmings, etc, and toss them in a pot. cover with water. Add a dried mushroom or 2 , maybe a bay leaf if you have some. Bring to boil and then simmer for 1/2 hour or longer before straining. Leftover stock can be kept in fridge for a few days.
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Old 12.10.2016, 17:53
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

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Although cubes of stock are cheap, I'm wary of MSG and prefer natural veggie stock, which just happens to be very easy to make and is basically free.

Take all of your veggie cut-offs- onion and garlic skins, pepper seedy parts, mushroom stem trimmings, etc, and toss them in a pot. cover with water. Add a dried mushroom or 2 , maybe a bay leaf if you have some. Bring to boil and then simmer for 1/2 hour or longer before straining. Leftover stock can be kept in fridge for a few days.

Can also be frozen btw to make it worthwhile to do a bigger batch!

Either in stockcube size by way of a icecube freezing plastic mould thingy or just measured in a tupperware.

I am just typing something now for the FB Blog, where I used homemade chicken stock

THANKS for the post
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Old 12.10.2016, 18:02
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

I do that as well.

If you ever peel your tomatoes? Dehydrate the peels for tomato powder
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Old 19.10.2016, 16:09
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Saving a little money here and there is so easily done......

Home made bread crumbs

Simply let the bread dry out completely and then grind, store in airtighht container
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Old 20.10.2016, 09:25
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

I eat all my bread. No leftovers.
With the price of organic bread, that would be a sin...
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Old 20.10.2016, 11:02
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

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I eat all my bread. No leftovers.
With the price of organic bread, that would be a sin...

Wrong!!
A sin it would be if you would bin it or let it get mouldy.

Whether organic or not, there is so much to create of stale bread, as you'll see in a few ticks
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Old 18.01.2017, 12:55
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Bump bump bumpety bump, shamelessly self advertising.


The English written Blog about Budgeting and Food on a budget is still going strong and has much more material to read in it now......just in case anyone's interested to sneak a peek or needs actual input in regards to this topic.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1057050264371996/
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Old 18.01.2017, 13:30
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

I'm beginning to think it's time you considered turning your amazing recipes (and the accompanying advice and stories) into a book!
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Old 18.01.2017, 13:38
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

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I'm beginning to think it's time you considered turning your amazing recipes (and the accompanying advice and stories) into a book!
Whoops, now you made me blush,and you've only seen the tip of the iceberg yet on there. I got so much more material in the Swiss German one...as well as 7 years of monthly columns to recycle and I am posting foodie stuff since 1999.....there are simply not enough hours in a day for my liking to work on it all.

You're not the first saying that about publishing a book, I have no clue how to start such an adventure....and who'd read it? There are no funds to pay an agent or however the helping people are called.
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Old 18.01.2017, 13:55
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Crowd-funding? Although I've absolutely no idea how that works!

I'll just have to start printing some of your ideas out then, in readiness for the days when we're going to have to survive on OH's pension alone.... must admit I've become very lazy about careful shopping and meal planning so your page on FB is an inspiration at times.

Sadly I don't understand swiss-german, but I really must forward the link for the s-g blog to #2 son's s-g speaking fiancée, and I expect she'll also have a look at the FB page.
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Old 18.01.2017, 14:35
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Amazon self-publishing? Maybe.

(For instance, I bought and will buy Geoffrey Steadman's works just to support him even though his books are available online and free. I remember him mentioning the profit (per book) in his blog but I can't really recall the amount at the moment.)

Last edited by Serk; 18.01.2017 at 15:20.
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Old 18.01.2017, 14:36
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Seems like a lot of what you write is what I call common sense which is severely lacking in many quarters these days. I too was brought up by my grandma who lived through a war with one egg for the whole family for a week (which of course was given to the kids). Grandad was always annoyed I had the nerve to want a bit of water in the bottom of the bath for a swish around wash which involved switching on the hot water which for him should only happen on a Sunday. They had no central heating so there was ice on the inside of the bathroom window. She had a vegetable patch & fed us fresh fruit & veg ... unpleasant memories of gooseberry jam & purple sprouting - and guess what I have growing in my garden now . Hand-me-downs were normal. I was lucky enough to find some lovely people with kids a bit older than mine who gave us what they'd finished with & I of course passed them on to the next one in the line afterwards.
Thanks for bumping the thread as I hadn't read it before.
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Old 18.01.2017, 15:40
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Re: Eating and living on a tight budget in Switzerland

Thank you @neddy, this is correct what you said about common sense.

Unfortunately, common sensical things such as budgeting, save until you can afford what you want and so, doesn't get taught often to the youngsters of today by their parents, as I could see with the male and female peers of my girls (now 26,20 and 18).
At school, at least here, home economics is only taught in 8th grade for one year and just the basics of it.

It pleases me to no end, when I get comments on the Blog to some practical hints and tips, saying.....oh I didn't know that......then I have reeached a goal, by 'teaching' someone something useful for their life.



@Anjela, this is the link to the Swiss German page

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1491971337686595/

The files are on purpose a word doc. makes it easier to print them out if one wants to.
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