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Old 09.09.2011, 15:06
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

Unfortunately it seems where I live some people are afraid of our labs!! Now where I come from they are seen as the stupidest dog It does however seem to be the owners with the SMALLEST dogs I have ever seen and are probably scared that our dogs might stand on them

Anyhow, our lovely doggies are more danger to themselves. They are so friendly they role on their backs with their legs in the air indicating the ....'LOVE ME POSE'. I die of embaressment of course

With regards to the Rotti story...friends of mine from SA specifically highlighted that dogs there are bred as guard dogs. She herself had huskie guard dogs who were friendly towards the family but are trained to kill tresspassers. Emphasis on the TRAINED.
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Old 09.09.2011, 15:13
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

Oh you poor victim. Was trying to give you some contructive advice. You can be treated for this type of problem.

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Typical - it's my fault!!

I suppose all those children and adults who have had their faces and other parts of their bodies ripped off were also at fault.

I suppose those yapping, snarling, bissige Appenzeller dogs on the wanderwege who get their teeth into my trousers are also my fault.

Look, keep all dogs on leads at all times and everywhere and no-one will be at fault.
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Old 09.09.2011, 15:23
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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If it were that easy Meloncollie ... but basically I don't care what the law says, it's no help to me. I'd prefer it if dogs would be on a leash at all times and that there would be a lot fewer of them. I live surrounded by woods and like to go walking but as you can guess there are dogs running around quite freely -although dogs have to be kept on a lead in woods at all times as far as I know.

Clearly I don't like to shout out and make public that I have a dog phobia. I have now and again asked that the dog be placed on a lead, and, as you can imagine, the immediate answer is always 'Oh, he won't do anything'.

Yes, it's simple, a dog off the lead even a little one at a distance of 200 meters is a small nightmare for me. It's always been the same for me and I see that my grandson has the same problem. Can it lie in the genes?
Fear not necessarily in the genes, probably a learnt response. Nature vs Nurture argument etc.

As for dogs off lead, please try to understand that in particular most dogs in Switzerland are the most well trained I have come across. Most responsible owners know their dogs and will put them on the line if they know they will run off etc.

Also, from a dog owner point of view, my dogs are allowed off lead in the woods as it is the ONLY place here that its safe to do so. They are safe from traffic. If someone passes by i.e. a runner or children my dogs are recalled as a precaution until invited to be stroked. I understand that some people don't like dogs but hey its a fact of life and we all have to learn to live with it.
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  #64  
Old 09.09.2011, 15:31
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This one has been bugging me since I moved here and today just has to be the camel that broke the straw mattress... and this is going to sound racist for added effect.

I know in some cultures dogs are considered dirty. Like pigs. These cultures think European people are weird for keeping them as pets. Like we think Suzanne Sugarbaker was weird for keeping a pig as a pet. Big I digress.

So whenever I am out on a walk with my dogs, invariably some dark-skinned immigrant kid will either cower in fear and/or let out a shrill shriek, and/or start running away from us. This of course elicits my youngest dog's responses: prey drive or threat drive. The child has now either become a juicy morsel or has become a threat to me and/or my dog and must be destroyed.

So now the kid is shrieking "Aaaaaaah!!!!!!", the dog is barking "rawr rawr rawr I'm gonna get you!" I'm rolling my eyes "ugh" and the parents are looking at me like I've done something wrong.

I don't have these types of experiences with whiter children. And I have even had some dark-skinned immigrant parents tell their children not to react like that, which of course makes everything better. And I've also had my dog make some delightful friendships with young children and not eat their faces (so I know it's not that my dog doesn't like children). Before I moved here, he even got on well with some Indian children down the street who LUVVED to play with him.

So I just have to ask... why do parents (generally speaking) teach their children to act like idiots around dogs? Even if the fear is REAL (yes I recognize that some children have very negative experiences that scar them for life), at least teach the child that their behavior will elicit more negative reactions.

(then there's the other topic of -- why do some adults go out of their way, stumbling over garbage bags, broken glass, hot coals, snake pits, and Pee Wee Herman's Funhouse to get as far away from passing a dog on the sidewalk as is possible.)

It just blows my mind. End Rant.
you almost had a point but come across as f****** racist

my experience is many kids are unsure or afraid of dogs and this develops on their own or due to parental issues with dogs. I've even had a perfectly sane woman tell me she was scared of dogs because her mother was bitten when she was in her womb.

key is to ensure your dogs are under control and behave reasonably around everyone. There is no changing the world - FFS the Blick is riding high on this fear to sell newspapers.
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Old 09.09.2011, 15:54
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Some very entertaining reading in this thread...
It is isn't it. Dog owners demanding that non-dog owners learn dog psychology, and dog-phobes should be compulsorily sterilised (or something, I skipped a bit).

More popcorn?
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Old 09.09.2011, 16:04
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Typical - it's my fault!!
Well, to be honest, it is.

I have a similar fear of wasps - irrational, extreme and quite debilitating at times.

Unfortunately, they don't make leads for wasps, so it is up to me to avoid situations where I might encounter such horrible creatures. I don't sit near rubbish bins, try to keep my food and drink covered when I have a picnic, and always check bus and train windows before taking my seat lest I get a vespine surprise in my ear.

It is my phobia, and, therefore, my responsibility.

Likewise, if dogs are exercising off their leads, as they are permitted to do (and, indeed, encouraged to do) in most cantons, then it is your responsibility to remove yourself from such an environment.

It seems the answer to everything these days is to insist that other people adjust their behaviour to suit our problems. It's about time we learnt to deal with our own issues, like our grandparents did, before we end up in a world where nobody is allowed to do anything for fear of upsetting someone with some phobia or other.

In a nutshell: get away from the dogs - or get a grip.
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Old 09.09.2011, 16:06
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Look, keep all dogs on leads at all times and everywhere and no-one will be at fault.
I as a dog-owner will be, if I won't let my dogs get enough exercise. Just walking on lead or running with me (me running, they casually strolling) is not enough for a big young energetic dog.

or what would you suggest, this?
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Old 09.09.2011, 16:12
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

That's a waste of fuel....try something like this........

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Old 09.09.2011, 16:23
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

Cows charged at me once....shall we tether them
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Old 09.09.2011, 16:56
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Well, to be honest, it is.

I have a similar fear of wasps - irrational, extreme and quite debilitating at times.

Unfortunately, they don't make leads for wasps, so it is up to me to avoid situations where I might encounter such horrible creatures. I don't sit near rubbish bins, try to keep my food and drink covered when I have a picnic, and always check bus and train windows before taking my seat lest I get a vespine surprise in my ear.

It is my phobia, and, therefore, my responsibility.

Likewise, if dogs are exercising off their leads, as they are permitted to do (and, indeed, encouraged to do) in most cantons, then it is your responsibility to remove yourself from such an environment.

It seems the answer to everything these days is to insist that other people adjust their behaviour to suit our problems. It's about time we learnt to deal with our own issues, like our grandparents did, before we end up in a world where nobody is allowed to do anything for fear of upsetting someone with some phobia or other.

In a nutshell: get away from the dogs - or get a grip.
I have a fear of wasps, too. I think it’s bigger than my fear of dogs, actually. It’s all quite embarrassing, not to mention irrational.


All phobias have one thing in common: fear of losing control or not being able to control a particular environmental factor.


I think it is completely out of order to demand the external world to accommodate our phobias. Such problems can only be solved individually and certainly not by increasing social control.

Here's a scientific take on phobias.
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Old 09.09.2011, 17:57
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Cows charged at me once....shall we tether them
Only if they keep trying to escape from the barbecue...
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Old 09.09.2011, 18:42
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Oh you poor victim. Was trying to give you some contructive advice. You can be treated for this type of problem.

I don't really look upon myself as a poor victim having put up with my fear and its consequences for many-a-year. It's simply that there are dogs out there which are not under control and owners who don't care. As I don't know when I'm out what I'm faced with I want all dogs on a lead.

You know yourself just how many dogs run free in those areas where there is a notice 'all dogs on lead', unfortunately often to no avail.
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Old 09.09.2011, 19:44
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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So now the kid is shrieking "Aaaaaaah!!!!!!", the dog is barking "rawr rawr rawr I'm gonna get you!"
and the owner is saying, "sit" then "quiet", the dog is sitting quietly, the situation is immediately resolved.


Sorry, didn't quite catch that? Ah, I see - we should just train the kids, not the dogs...
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Old 09.09.2011, 19:52
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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Unfortunately it seems where I live some people are afraid of our labs!! Now where I come from they are seen as the stupidest dog It does however seem to be the owners with the SMALLEST dogs I have ever seen and are probably scared that our dogs might stand on them

Anyhow, our lovely doggies are more danger to themselves. They are so friendly they role on their backs with their legs in the air indicating the ....'LOVE ME POSE'. I die of embaressment of course
As a bigoted giant dog owner.... Yeah, labs are kinda dumb in an adorable sort of way...though your dogs share the burden of being over 10 pounds and, thus, often assumed to be a vicious killer. I try to refrain from generalizing but...the general rule of thumb is that the smaller the dog, the more likely it is to be vicious and bite, especially the terriers considering that's their nature. My poor Saint Bernard suffered so many small dogs their ill behaviors, but I have to admit the time the himalayan terrier who had been biting at his balls caused him to turn around and flatten that little shite and give him what for. The owner was in a bit of a snit but...even she had to admit he was lucky to be alive given his behavior.

I never hesitate to give a big dog a pat....it's the little dogs I ask for permission to greet.
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Old 09.09.2011, 20:01
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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It is isn't it. Dog owners demanding that non-dog owners learn dog psychology, and dog-phobes should be compulsorily sterilised (or something, I skipped a bit).

More popcorn?

I wouldn't dismiss it quite so handily as it is important, especially if you are afraid of dogs, to understand what sorts of behavior makes them violent. Again, the worst idea you can have is to run away from a dog. My own child, had to learn this the hard way as I repeatedly explained that games with the big marshmallow of a saint bernard must not include running...but she did, and she had to learn the hard way that her giant friend might have weird ideas about playtime. And this was a dog who adored her and her, him. It has nothing to do with violence, but behavior.

I'll be honest and say that I don't like cats in general (though I have found that I like a few in particular) but I did read up on cats to find what does and does not go over well with cats in my attempt to get along with them. Education goes a long way both for owners and those afraid as well.

Dogs, by and large, are much more friendly than cats so it pays to "Selber Schuld" about dogs and their behaviour.
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  #76  
Old 09.09.2011, 20:01
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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I as a dog-owner will be, if I won't let my dogs get enough exercise. Just walking on lead or running with me (me running, they casually strolling) is not enough for a big young energetic dog.

or what would you suggest, this?

I used to watch a guy walk his Dane in a similar style in a park many moons ago...it happens...not that I find it sane.
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Old 09.09.2011, 20:56
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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As a bigoted giant dog owner.... Yeah, labs are kinda dumb in an adorable sort of way...though your dogs share the burden of being over 10 pounds and, thus, often assumed to be a vicious killer. I try to refrain from generalizing but...the general rule of thumb is that the smaller the dog, the more likely it is to be vicious and bite, especially the terriers considering that's their nature. My poor Saint Bernard suffered so many small dogs their ill behaviors, but I have to admit the time the himalayan terrier who had been biting at his balls caused him to turn around and flatten that little shite and give him what for. The owner was in a bit of a snit but...even she had to admit he was lucky to be alive given his behavior.

I never hesitate to give a big dog a pat....it's the little dogs I ask for permission to greet.

Very much in agreement!
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Old 09.09.2011, 21:56
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

And to continue the analogy, both dogs and wasps can be dealt with by a sharp whack with a newspaper!

I grew up with large dogs in the house - setter cross, rottweiler and bull mastiff. If I was out with the dog, and there was a small child or other situation where someone is clearly a bit nervous around large dogs I would either call the dog to heel or say something reassuring to the person involved. It is just basic courtesy and anything a responsible dog owner would do.

Jack, the bull mastiff used to have a habit of shoving his nose up people's bums. My Dad was with him once at a tailor's shop to get a jacket altered. In the same shop was an old chap standing in his shirt tails while he was getting button sewn on his trousers. Anyway, he wasn't looking and Jack did his usual nuzzling up to this bloke's behind. Of course the old started and thought someone had pinched his bum, and was all ready for a fight until he saw this ten stone hound looking a bit sheepish! Needless to say my Dad apologised profusely for the infraction.

Cheers,
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Well, to be honest, it is.

I have a similar fear of wasps - irrational, extreme and quite debilitating at times.

Unfortunately, they don't make leads for wasps, so it is up to me to avoid situations where I might encounter such horrible creatures. I don't sit near rubbish bins, try to keep my food and drink covered when I have a picnic, and always check bus and train windows before taking my seat lest I get a vespine surprise in my ear.

It is my phobia, and, therefore, my responsibility.

Likewise, if dogs are exercising off their leads, as they are permitted to do (and, indeed, encouraged to do) in most cantons, then it is your responsibility to remove yourself from such an environment.

It seems the answer to everything these days is to insist that other people adjust their behaviour to suit our problems. It's about time we learnt to deal with our own issues, like our grandparents did, before we end up in a world where nobody is allowed to do anything for fear of upsetting someone with some phobia or other.

In a nutshell: get away from the dogs - or get a grip.
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Old 10.09.2011, 07:57
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

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I try to refrain from generalizing but...the general rule of thumb is that the smaller the dog, the more likely it is to be vicious and bite, especially the terriers considering that's their nature. My poor Saint Bernard suffered so many small dogs their ill behaviors, but I have to admit the time the himalayan terrier who had been biting at his balls caused him to turn around and flatten that little shite and give him what for. The owner was in a bit of a snit but...even she had to admit he was lucky to be alive given his behavior.
Does.not.compute.........

As the owner of a smaller dog, and terrier at that, I hate this "big dog" snobbery. Small dogs are yappy, small dogs are untrained yadda yadda. I dont ever recall encountering more smaller dogs being more untrained than the bigger ones.

True, bigger dogs dont get away with alot of things like the smaller ones do. Most of them dont jump on you in excitement. But imagine a 60 pound rottie/staffie mix charging at you and your smaller dog before trying to engage you in a tug of war to get that toy out of your hands, almost yanking your arm off and your efforts at saying "AUS!!!!" doesnt help. Or a lab interrupting your game of fetch with your dog, by charging at the ball the same time as your dog, causing the poor fella to roll twice over, before claiming the ball for himself and refusing to come back despite the owner calling. The owner had to chase him a couple of times before he could get the ball back.

Or even another lab trying to hump a 20 pounds terrier and it took the owner and me to yank him off.

I find it extremely funny when I encounter situations like these but do feel a stab of annoyance too because its sad when terriers get a bad name. Dont get me started on chis! Seriously - I love ALL dogs but have terriers all my life. They are hardy, determined and cheeky little buggers. What you tell another dog once, you'll need to tell the terrier 3-4 times because they have a little mind of their own but they are delightful and charming critters who will pitter patter straight in to your heart. /fluff

Like any other dog, they just need a firm hand. I always say that its the owner and their responsibility on how to manage their chosen breed and know their limitations (be it a Chi, terrier, staffie, rottie etc) - never the dog's fault. Especially not his breed or size.
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Old 10.09.2011, 08:15
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Re: Teaching Children to Fear Dogs

That's great if you persist with the training. I think some people give duo with the more difficult breeds. I saw these chiwawas once in quali pet go mental at us with our two snarling barking and pulling at us. The owners just kept swearing at them yanking them across the floor.

A neighbour of ours has a terrier and thinks its amusing that his dog lunges at us on our walks ....

On a different note my sister has a parsons terrier who's very well trained and loves to play Chase with my younger one.

It's not big dog snobbery its just we HAVE to ensure our dogs are under control as any bad behaviour is noted. They are considered dangerous over a certain weight Grrrrrr. But it seems that some smaller untrained dogs go about their business either way. And i say some as not all small dogs are yappy little s*its. It boils down to the owner.


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Does.not.compute.........

As the owner of a smaller dog, and terrier at that, I hate this "big dog" snobbery. Small dogs are yappy, small dogs are untrained yadda yadda. I dont ever recall encountering more smaller dogs being more untrained than the bigger ones.

True, bigger dogs dont get away with alot of things like the smaller ones do. Most of them dont jump on you in excitement. But imagine a 60 pound rottie/staffie mix charging at you and your smaller dog before trying to engage you in a tug of war to get that toy out of your hands, almost yanking your arm off and your efforts at saying "AUS!!!!" doesnt help. Or a lab interrupting your game of fetch with your dog, by charging at the ball the same time as your dog, causing the poor fella to roll twice over, before claiming the ball for himself and refusing to come back despite the owner calling. The owner had to chase him a couple of times before he could get the ball back.

Or even another lab trying to hump a 20 pounds terrier and it took the owner and me to yank him off.

I find it extremely funny when I encounter situations like these but do feel a stab of annoyance too because its sad when terriers get a bad name. Dont get me started on chis! Seriously - I've had terriers all my life. They are hardy, determined and cheeky little buggers. What you tell another dog once, you'll need to tell the terrier 3-4 times because they have a little mind of their own but they are delightful and charming little buggers who will win your heart when given the chance.

Like any other dog, they just need a firm hand (well firmer than most). I always say that its the owner and their responsibility on how to manage their chosen breed (be it a Chi, terrier, staffie, rottie etc) - never the dog's fault. Nor his breed or size.
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