Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Complaints corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 09.10.2011, 21:05
eddiejc1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Derwood, MD USA
Posts: 1,005
Groaned at 22 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 684 Times in 372 Posts
eddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
BASLE is the English name of Basel ! Those English radio/TV presenters might take a crash course of English language for a change
Maybe I've been hanging around this forum too much, but to me "Basel" and "Bern" seem like the correct spelling. If that's the way those cities are spelled in German, I can't imagine the natives would object if the "English" spelling changed to match their own.

P.S. Then again, I ought to feel that "Genève" is correct (and it is---in French), but nobody here writes it that way in English, so I don't.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 09.10.2011, 21:42
marton's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kt. Zürich
Posts: 11,810
Groaned at 611 Times in 517 Posts
Thanked 21,741 Times in 11,421 Posts
marton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
Maybe I've been hanging around this forum too much, but to me "Basel" and "Bern" seem like the correct spelling. If that's the way those cities are spelled in German, I can't imagine the natives would object if the "English" spelling changed to match their own.

P.S. Then again, I ought to feel that "Genève" is correct (and it is---in French), but nobody here writes it that way in English, so I don't.

Correct is Genf
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 09.10.2011, 22:00
Wollishofener's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Glattbrugg
Posts: 18,978
Groaned at 332 Times in 257 Posts
Thanked 11,715 Times in 6,858 Posts
Wollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
Maybe I've been hanging around this forum too much, but to me "Basel" and "Bern" seem like the correct spelling. If that's the way those cities are spelled in German, I can't imagine the natives would object if the "English" spelling changed to match their own.

P.S. Then again, I ought to feel that "Genève" is correct (and it is---in French), but nobody here writes it that way in English, so I don't.
- sure you are "helvetized" ! Because the English names of Basel and Bern are Basle and Berne, while it in French is Bâle and Berne. Sure, nobody in Basel or Bern objects to English speakers using the German names

- Genève is the French name of the city, but Geneva is its English name (look at the airport etc) while Genf is its German name.

- In case of Zürich the English and German names only differ by not having the ¨ in place, but its very important Italian name is Zurigo -- important due to the big Italian population share and the heavy contribution of Italians and Ticinesi onto culture and economy here. You at times will see the Latin name Turicum which at times is used with pride. You however may use the name Zurigo when speaking with Italians and Ticinesi in English or French or German

- in case of Schaffhausen, the dialect-name is Schaffuuse, but the French translation-name was dropped long ago, at least in practice

- the English name of St. Gallen of course is St. Gall, while the towns of Frauenfeld, Kreuzlingen and Stein-am-Rhein only have their German names, with Stein-am-Rhein in dialect being either (generally) Schtei-am-Rii or (locally) Schtaa-am-Rii .

- Konstanz however in both English and French is Constance

- Lausanne also is Lausanne in other languages, but the Canton of Vaud in German of course is Waadtland
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 09.10.2011, 22:08
marton's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kt. Zürich
Posts: 11,810
Groaned at 611 Times in 517 Posts
Thanked 21,741 Times in 11,421 Posts
marton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond reputemarton has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
- sure you are "helvetized" ! Because the English names of Basel and Bern are Basle and Berne, while it in French is Bâle and Berne. Sure, nobody in Basel or Bern objects to English speakers using the German names

- Genève is the French name of the city, but Geneva is its English name (look at the airport etc) while Genf is its German name.

- In case of Zürich the English and German names only differ by not having the ¨ in place, but its very important Italian name is Zurigo -- important due to the big Italian population share and the heavy contribution of Italians and Ticinesi onto culture and economy here. You at times will see the Latin name Turicum which at times is used with pride. You however may use the name Zurigo when speaking with Italians and Ticinesi in English or French or German

- in case of Schaffhausen, the dialect-name is Schaffuuse, but the French translation-name was dropped long ago, at least in practice

- the English name of St. Gallen of course is St. Gall, while the towns of Frauenfeld, Kreuzlingen and Stein-am-Rhein only have their German names, with Stein-am-Rhein in dialect being either (generally) Schtei-am-Rii or (locally) Schtaa-am-Rii .

- Konstanz however in both English and French is Constance

- Lausanne also is Lausanne in other languages, but the Canton of Vaud in German of course is Waadtland

About "Konstanz however in both English and French is Constance"

Always amused by the fact that Lake Constance is Bodensee in German.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 09.10.2011, 23:11
tearley's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Lausanne (Vaud)
Posts: 428
Groaned at 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 409 Times in 190 Posts
tearley has an excellent reputationtearley has an excellent reputationtearley has an excellent reputationtearley has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Well, we'll give the Ticinesi an out on this one because they can't be expected to pronounce anything that doesn't end in a final vowel.

Quote:
View Post
Well, for us Swiss in this neck of the woods, it IS Argovia, Turgovia, Lucerna, Zurigo, etc.!

I don't think my girlfriend even knows the German names of those places (despite having an attinenza in ZH) , we certainly only use the Italian names at home!

Also, it's not just English media, but any non-German media will use the correct name for their language (I guarantee that all Italian and Ticinese newspapers, TV and radio always refer to Zurich as Zurigo, etc.)

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 09.10.2011, 23:39
Wollishofener's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Glattbrugg
Posts: 18,978
Groaned at 332 Times in 257 Posts
Thanked 11,715 Times in 6,858 Posts
Wollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond reputeWollishofener has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
About "Konstanz however in both English and French is Constance"

Always amused by the fact that Lake Constance is Bodensee in German.
"Boden" refers to the Bodanrücken

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodanr%C3%BCck

just northwest of Konstanz
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 10.10.2011, 12:35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Fribourg
Posts: 428
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 212 Times in 102 Posts
Millso has made some interesting contributions
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
P.S. Then again, I ought to feel that "Genève" is correct (and it is---in French), but nobody here writes it that way in English, so I don't.
Probably to do with the fact that english keyboards don't have an "è" button and therefore would require learning the ascii code (alt-0232 for anyone interested)


The english are renowned for not calling places by their correct name, Derry being called London Derry for instance
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 10.10.2011, 12:52
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post


The english are renowned for not calling places by their correct name,
As opposed to whom?
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank for this useful post:
  #69  
Old 10.10.2011, 13:03
glennsche's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: zurich
Posts: 303
Groaned at 9 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 425 Times in 139 Posts
glennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
Yeah, whenever I talk to people in the UK, it always turns to, "Oh, I know Switzerland, it's the euthanasia place, right?"

Still, at least they know where Switzerland is. Most of my former US acquaintenances think I live in Sweden.
"wait, youre moving? where are you going?"
"im emigrating to zurich. in switzerland."
"i thought you spoke german, not swedish."

[facepalm]
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 10.10.2011, 13:07
glennsche's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: zurich
Posts: 303
Groaned at 9 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 425 Times in 139 Posts
glennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
First of all, it is al-Qāhira and not Cairo, Le Caire or Kairo.
Second, the situation for Germany is even worse.

Geman, Norwegian: Deutschland, Tyskland
English, Italian, Greek: Germany, Germania, Γερμανία
French, Spanish: Allemagne, Alemania
Finish, Estonian: Saksa, Saksamaa
Croatian, Czech : Njemačka, Německo
Latvian, Lithuanian :Vācija, Vokietija

this might be relevant to these:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/...-allemagne-etc
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 10.10.2011, 13:20
glennsche's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: zurich
Posts: 303
Groaned at 9 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 425 Times in 139 Posts
glennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputationglennsche has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
Probably to do with the fact that english keyboards don't have an "è" button and therefore would require learning the ascii code (alt-0232 for anyone interested)


The english are renowned for not calling places by their correct name, Derry being called London Derry for instance
yeah im with dougals Breakfast on this one... it was fashionable during the 19th century to have names for foreign places. i think much like the biblical names all have their different european langauge equivalents, i think cities did as well.

My favorite example: Bratislava. The Slovaks called it Bratislava, the Germans Pressburg and the Hungarians Pozsony.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 11.10.2011, 00:26
eddiejc1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Derwood, MD USA
Posts: 1,005
Groaned at 22 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 684 Times in 372 Posts
eddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
First of all, it is al-Qāhira and not Cairo, Le Caire or Kairo.
Second, the situation for Germany is even worse.

Geman, Norwegian: Deutschland, Tyskland
English, Italian, Greek: Germany, Germania, Γερμανία
French, Spanish: Allemagne, Alemania
Finish, Estonian: Saksa, Saksamaa
Croatian, Czech : Njemačka, Německo
Latvian, Lithuanian :Vācija, Vokietija
Of all the foreign names for the country known in English as "Germany", the Japanese seem to be closest to the German name---maybe because they were allies in WWII.

Deutschland (German)
ドイツ (or "Doitsu") (Japanese)
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 11.10.2011, 04:44
eddiejc1's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Derwood, MD USA
Posts: 1,005
Groaned at 22 Times in 20 Posts
Thanked 684 Times in 372 Posts
eddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputationeddiejc1 has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
www.EnglishTeachersforEsperanto.blogspot.com Why should English be the world language? Because Americans removed their indigenous children by force to anglify them? Because of hundreds of years of slavery? Because of US right-wing miltary interventions around the world? Give me a better reason and reality!
If Mandarin supplants English as the international lingua franca, will it be time to gripe about the Cultural Revolution and the Tiananmen Square crackdown? If it's Spanish, do we bring up Cortez and the Spanish Civil War? If Arabic, do we gripe about Islamic terrorists?

In a recent thread about Swiss-German, Wolli pointed out the obvious---that the reason why the Swiss never made one of their dialects a separate language like Dutch was because knowing high German as a lingua franca was incredibly useful. I'd follow the Swiss example and be grateful that there IS an international lingua franca, and even more grateful that I can speak it. This doesn't mean English speakers shouldn't learn new languages, because although (for example) many Swiss can speak English, newcomers to Switzerland who think they don't have to learn the local language because they speak English quickly learn otherwise. But I'm not going to stand by and let the language of Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., Nelson Mandela, and Mohandas Gandhi and many others get abused because you have an axe to grind against the United States.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank eddiejc1 for this useful post:
  #74  
Old 11.10.2011, 08:08
jj muge's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: BE
Posts: 249
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 189 Times in 108 Posts
jj muge has an excellent reputationjj muge has an excellent reputationjj muge has an excellent reputationjj muge has an excellent reputation
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
Of all the foreign names for the country known in English as "Germany", the Japanese seem to be closest to the German name---maybe because they were allies in WWII.
Deutschland (German)
ドイツ (or "Doitsu") (Japanese)
WWII? Or maybe they just tried to reproduce the sound of either the german word "deutsch" or the dutch word "duits".
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 11.10.2011, 08:20
Fridge's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Zürich
Posts: 687
Groaned at 23 Times in 19 Posts
Thanked 757 Times in 331 Posts
Fridge has a reputation beyond reputeFridge has a reputation beyond reputeFridge has a reputation beyond reputeFridge has a reputation beyond repute
Quote:
View Post
www.EnglishTeachersforEsperanto.blogspot.com Why should English be the world language? Because Americans removed their indigenous children by force to anglify them? Because of hundreds of years of slavery? Because of US right-wing miltary interventions around the world? Give me a better reason and reality!
May come as news, but English didn't originate in the Americas; nor was it Americans that really perpetuated the language.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank Fridge for this useful post:
  #76  
Old 11.10.2011, 10:47
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Monaco
Posts: 514
Groaned at 61 Times in 27 Posts
Thanked 658 Times in 281 Posts
scrambled has a reputation beyond reputescrambled has a reputation beyond reputescrambled has a reputation beyond reputescrambled has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Switzerland being mentioned in English Media

Quote:
View Post
May come as news, but English didn't originate in the Americas; nor was it Americans that really perpetuated the language.
Might come as news to you, but since the 1930s the spread of English as the global language was largely driven by the US through its economic and cultural influence. People learned English to do business with American companies and watch American movies and listen to American music. And more recently, American dominance over internet content and infrastructure has only cemented its role as the reason why the world speaks English.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank scrambled for this useful post:
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
English speaking advertising/media jobs in Geneva?? FlowerRose Employment 6 20.01.2015 14:37
C Permit after 5 years of being in Switzerland or since being on a B permit? digg Permits/visas/government 49 30.03.2009 17:43
Digital Media in Switzerland Dani_SF Business & entrepreneur 3 05.03.2008 17:57


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:11.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0