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  #21  
Old 01.10.2011, 12:11
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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Isn't the "h" also pronounced differently in English Alphabet - something like "haych"?

Nah...in "evolved English" we say "hyach"...

Where does "hyach" come from in the UK. I work with a guy from the midlands who says "hyach" but my friend from London does not.
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  #22  
Old 01.10.2011, 12:17
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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Nah...in "evolved English" we say "hyach"...

Where does "hyach" come from in the UK. I work with a guy from the midlands who says "hyach" but my friend from London does not.
huh?
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  #23  
Old 01.10.2011, 12:25
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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I get the point....I kind of wince too when somebody says English alphabet as it is strictly the Latin/Roman alphabet and to call it English is a little colonial.
Not quite, as the Latin/Roman alphabet had no J or U.

Italian alphabet has no J,K or W.

Tom
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  #24  
Old 01.10.2011, 12:32
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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huh?

LOl I meant that in evolved English we say "aech".

Some Brits say "hych"...but not all.
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  #25  
Old 01.10.2011, 13:05
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_alphabets
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  #26  
Old 01.10.2011, 13:05
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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The modern English alphabet is a Latin alphabet...

So, only the upper and lower case abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz - and, importantly, as it's English, the "z" is to be pronounced "zed"
Zed is dead, baby, Zed is dead.
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  #27  
Old 01.10.2011, 17:21
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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Nah...in "evolved English" we say "hyach"...

Where does "hyach" come from in the UK. I work with a guy from the midlands who says "hyach" but my friend from London does not.
I think you mean 'aitch' Having 2 in my surname (one at the beginning and the other silent), I had it drilled into me, from a very early age the it's 'aitch' and not 'haitch'. Although, where I come from most people pronounce it incorrectly as 'haitch' and drop the 'aitch' at the beginning of words. Very annoying.
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Old 01.10.2011, 17:33
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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I think you mean 'aitch' Having 2 in my surname (one at the beginning and the other silent), I had it drilled into me, from a very early age the it's 'aitch' and not 'haitch'. Although, where I come from most people pronounce it incorrectly as 'haitch' and drop the 'aitch' at the beginning of words. Very annoying.
Well, all those dropped aitches have to end up somewhere ...
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Old 02.10.2011, 07:48
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

This is not always the case. US English is in some ways more archaic than English English. For example, the original spelling was "civilization". It only morphed to "civilisation" relatively recently.

Another difference between the two is that English English tends to permit more meanings for the same word. American English restricts (probably some Germanic influence). In that way, American English is de-volving, becoming less rich.
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  #30  
Old 02.10.2011, 09:45
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

I would guess that in this context it is intended for writing German words with umlauts (and for more northerly sorts, the ß character, as in Straße). There is an established method of doing this, so that Zürich becomes Zuerich and Straße becomes Strasse. I would guess that there are some older computer systems that can't cope with the extra characters, or can't be relied upon to handle them correctly, so the instruction is intended to avoid the problem.
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Old 02.10.2011, 10:21
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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Where does "hyach" come from in the UK. I work with a guy from the midlands who says "hyach" but my friend from London does not.
I don't think it's a regional thing, I think it's just a form of hyper-correction that's been springing up all over the nation for a number of years. Sounds vile.
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  #32  
Old 02.10.2011, 10:44
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

'Haitch' (and this will undoubtedly stir up a wave of protest) has long been associated with Roman Catholicism and convent education. The controversial part of this post is that because of its Catholic roots, and the historical place of Catholicism in British society, 'haitch' is common among the 'lower classes' or blue-collar working-class.

Last edited by Guest; 02.10.2011 at 14:27. Reason: Typo
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Old 02.10.2011, 11:03
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Re: What is the English Alphabet?

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This is not always the case. US English is in some ways more archaic than English English. For example, the original spelling was "civilization". It only morphed to "civilisation" relatively recently.
Latin, where it comes from, spelled it civilisatio, so American English just brought back the even much more archaic version.

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Another difference between the two is that English English tends to permit more meanings for the same word. American English restricts (probably some Germanic influence). In that way, American English is de-volving, becoming less rich.
Really? Just take the four-letter words that make up about 40% of the average American vocabulary (sh1t and phuck), and you will find they both have enough meanings to fill half a dictionary.
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