Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Complaints corner  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #641  
Old 12.07.2008, 02:32
mik's Avatar
mik mik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Solothurn
Posts: 40
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 20 Times in 9 Posts
mik has earned some respectmik has earned some respect
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
For the love of a god! Why is it that, whenever there is a criticism levelled at this country somebody lays the foreigner card down and expects that to clear everything up nicely. Not only is that so bleeding stupid that it defies description, but it is also (DUH) racist, you arse.

I have driven in Italy and find them single mindedly moronic when it comes to pedestrian crossings. They do not stop for anyone. But what that has two do with complaining about Swiss driving and manners is beyond me.

Swiss driving is passive aggression at its best. They spend their whole lives in a place of false Gruezi and En Guete that they have to vent their anger whenever they are on the roads.
Read the posts carefully before answering!
Ticino answered to a post that mentioned some bad driving people ("...obviously all swiss....." = also pretty racist you .....). Pointing out that there are a lot of none swiss people driving in this country is not a bad thing. Why don't we talk about people in Switzerland (not at all racist) instead.

And what's bad about comparing driving in to countries. I also suggest to you: go and have a drive in Italy! Please go!
Reply With Quote
  #642  
Old 12.07.2008, 15:44
Mikey's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ex-Zurich now relieved
Posts: 650
Groaned at 18 Times in 16 Posts
Thanked 473 Times in 245 Posts
Mikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
Read the posts carefully before answering!
Gee thanks for the advice. I often read just one or two words from a post before answering, seems like you do the same.

Quote:
View Post
Ticino answered to a post that mentioned some bad driving people ("...obviously all swiss....." = also pretty racist you .....). Pointing out that there are a lot of none swiss people driving in this country is not a bad thing. Why don't we talk about people in Switzerland (not at all racist) instead.
The reason why I wrote "obviously all Swiss" was to inject a little bit of humour in to what had been a damn annoying experience. As you are Swiss you will have missed the humour completely and shifted straight in to defensive mode, as can be seen from your next comment.

Quote:
View Post
And what's bad about comparing driving in to countries. I also suggest to you: go and have a drive in Italy! Please go!
I take it that you are telling me to leave the country with your last statement. This is usually the response we foreigners get when we complain about something in this wretched country of yours.

Of course there are foreigners driving on the roads here I'M ONE OF THEM YOU SOFT HEAD. Pointing out that there are foreigners on the roads is implying that they are the one's driving badly. Read the Colonel's statement, even if 20% of the people in this town are foreigners that still leaves 80% that are Swiss. You may as well point out that there are a lot of people that own a dog who are driving as well, in fact it would probably make more sense.
Reply With Quote
  #643  
Old 28.07.2008, 14:51
transition
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Swiss Manners

None of these issues in my view compare with a certain trait here that really gets to me. I've read some really funny (& true) stories of the stare & I feel an urge to expand on that under the sub-title of 'food-staring'... ...'food staring' is when you pull up a chair in a restaurant (or outside), order your drink (with not too much attention so far) & when your meal is delivered everyone around you (especially if they are also waiting for their meal ie. hungry) cranes their neck to see what you are about to eat. It can even become the new topic of a group of peoples conversation.
OK, it does happen everywhere I admit but in Switzerland there seems to be no holding back, sometimes initially it can cause all conversations to stop within a 15m radius depending on where you are & I feel like my plate of food could just as well be a pink frog or a flourescent green bunny.
It's even worse if you happen to be eating with Swiss people as what you are (all) about to eat seems to become a huge topic of conversation & eating the meal itself secondary.
I suppose I'm getting used to it now but I do still feel the urge to ask especially just the coffee or beer drinkers if they would like some
Reply With Quote
  #644  
Old 28.07.2008, 15:57
Colonelboris's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Southampton, UK
Posts: 1,137
Groaned at 17 Times in 17 Posts
Thanked 1,273 Times in 671 Posts
Colonelboris has a reputation beyond reputeColonelboris has a reputation beyond reputeColonelboris has a reputation beyond reputeColonelboris has a reputation beyond reputeColonelboris has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
None of these issues in my view compare with a certain trait here that really gets to me. I've read some really funny (& true) stories of the stare & I feel an urge to expand on that under the sub-title of 'food-staring'... ...'food staring' is when you pull up a chair in a restaurant (or outside), order your drink (with not too much attention so far) & when your meal is delivered everyone around you (especially if they are also waiting for their meal ie. hungry) cranes their neck to see what you are about to eat. It can even become the new topic of a group of peoples conversation.
OK, it does happen everywhere I admit but in Switzerland there seems to be no holding back, sometimes initially it can cause all conversations to stop within a 15m radius depending on where you are & I feel like my plate of food could just as well be a pink frog or a flourescent green bunny.
It's even worse if you happen to be eating with Swiss people as what you are (all) about to eat seems to become a huge topic of conversation & eating the meal itself secondary.
I suppose I'm getting used to it now but I do still feel the urge to ask especially just the coffee or beer drinkers if they would like some
I'm an anti-social eater and like to eat alone. I'll freely admit that I hate it when people try to have a full-on conversation with me when I'm trying to eat. But they seem to really specialise here in plaguing me while I'm having lunch, even to the point of comments like 'Oh, didn't you have that for lunch the other day?'
I'm thinking of getting the library keys over lunch and squirreling myself away in the 'book bunker' for the very short lunch break I take. I reckon if I hide in the old French journals, I should be ok as people in my lab seem to have a real fear of having to look through them.
Not a big thing at all, really, but I'm ill and feeling cantankerous.
__________________
New book out now: European Bird Names: A Translation Guide.
www.tonykeenebirds,co,uk - photos, paintings and drawings of Swiss, Australian, NZ and British birds
Reply With Quote
  #645  
Old 29.07.2008, 03:11
higgybaby's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 1,044
Groaned at 44 Times in 28 Posts
Thanked 815 Times in 422 Posts
higgybaby has a reputation beyond reputehiggybaby has a reputation beyond reputehiggybaby has a reputation beyond reputehiggybaby has a reputation beyond reputehiggybaby has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
90% of the time, the Swiss I encounter are polite, courteous, helpful - etc etc.

However, when it comes to walking along the street in broad daylight, respecting personal space, their ideas of etiquette seem to be a little bit different from they ones I have been raised with.

Today walking along Steinenvorstadt in Basel and aroudn a couple of shops I experienced about half a dozen people either bump into me - or nearly bump into - all because they weren't looking where they were going How much will I have to lower my standards to achieve this I wonder?

Cheers,
Nick
Going to Nick's original posting (I'm new to the forum), I've noticed that a lot more people in Switzerland wear glasses than in the UK. Maybe these Herr/Frau Magoos just need to get their prescriptions updated. Also seem to be unusually more cross eyed people here too.

In my department of 7 people I'm the only one who doesn't wear glasses. It's quite funny when they refer to the checking process called "Four Eyes" technique (two people checking work).
Reply With Quote
  #646  
Old 14.08.2008, 13:51
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 12
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
pifoux2000 has no particular reputation at present
Re: Swiss Manners

well that's funny you point that out I was wondering if I was the only one to notice that.

It's not even that they don't apologize that shocks me... but the fact that they just bump into you like if you were invisible. It happens to me all the time, even if I am the only person on the sidewalk.....

And if you're in a very crowded place, instead of just touching your shoulder and say "entschuldigung" so you understand you're on their way, they just push you !!!
Reply With Quote
  #647  
Old 14.08.2008, 15:35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Zurich
Posts: 388
Groaned at 8 Times in 8 Posts
Thanked 240 Times in 124 Posts
Andreas Stofer is considered knowledgeableAndreas Stofer is considered knowledgeableAndreas Stofer is considered knowledgeable
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I've noticed that a lot more people in Switzerland wear glasses than in the UK. Maybe these Herr/Frau Magoos just need to get their prescriptions updated.
From personal experience the people really needing their eyes checked are the ones who don't wear glasses (or contacts).

Quote:
View Post
Also seem to be unusually more cross eyed people here too..
Well there's this guy on TV Roger de Weck and the german guy at school 20 years ago.

Last edited by Andreas Stofer; 14.08.2008 at 16:02.
Reply With Quote
  #648  
Old 14.08.2008, 15:51
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Swiss Manners

I noticed that when I first came here. Wearing glasses is not regarded as adopting a geek-look even the gruesome thick-rimmed National-Health style. I don't know why so many people prefer them over contact lenses ? Is it to look deep and serious ?

dave

Quote:
View Post
Going to Nick's original posting (I'm new to the forum), I've noticed that a lot more people in Switzerland wear glasses than in the UK.
Reply With Quote
  #649  
Old 14.08.2008, 16:06
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I noticed that when I first came here. Wearing glasses is not regarded as adopting a geek-look even the gruesome thick-rimmed National-Health style. I don't know why so many people prefer them over contact lenses ? Is it to look deep and serious ?

dave
More red and watery if you stare at a computer screen for 10 hours a day whilst wearing contact lenses.

I went back to wearing my specs after I got fed up with stingy eyes every day. Now I just wear contact lenses for special occasions but even then it scares my one-year old because he's not sure he recognises me...
Reply With Quote
  #650  
Old 17.08.2008, 14:57
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Paris
Posts: 49
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 13 Times in 7 Posts
Bricin has no particular reputation at present
Re: Swiss Manners

I spent time outside of Switzerland recently. I returned and was cycling on the Uetliberg the other day and the following riddle suggested itself to me:
---
Two Swiss people are walking along a path 3 meters wide. Which side will they walk on?

"All of them"
---
Still working on the setup, but I get laughs from every expat I've tried it out on.

I cannot for the life of me figure this out. In most parts of the world people will stay right, and pass left. I make allowances for "stay left" people and assume they are from the UK or other lefty-locales, fair enough. But pick a side, any side, sort of stay there and people will go around.
Reply With Quote
The following 4 users would like to thank Bricin for this useful post:
  #651  
Old 17.08.2008, 16:10
Rustygraben's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 952
Groaned at 5 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 1,102 Times in 556 Posts
Rustygraben has a reputation beyond reputeRustygraben has a reputation beyond reputeRustygraben has a reputation beyond reputeRustygraben has a reputation beyond reputeRustygraben has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

It would seem to me that the Swiss, not wanting to choose any side, would rather opt to walk perfectly in the middle. Conflicts, such as deciding who should give way when somebody comes from the other direction, are settled by popular vote.
Reply With Quote
  #652  
Old 17.08.2008, 20:09
AbFab's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Zürich
Posts: 8,524
Groaned at 364 Times in 251 Posts
Thanked 12,739 Times in 4,345 Posts
AbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond reputeAbFab has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I spent time outside of Switzerland recently. I returned and was cycling on the Uetliberg the other day and the following riddle suggested itself to me:

---
Two Swiss people are walking along a path 3 meters wide. Which side will they walk on?
"All of them"
---
Still working on the setup, but I get laughs from every expat I've tried it out on.

I cannot for the life of me figure this out. In most parts of the world people will stay right, and pass left. I make allowances for "stay left" people and assume they are from the UK or other lefty-locales, fair enough. But pick a side, any side, sort of stay there and people will go around.
You have rather answered your own question here. See the parts I have made bold. On walking paths, however wide and on the Uetliberg they are wide as many people walk there, there is no rule which side you walk on and cycling is generally forbidden...
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank AbFab for this useful post:
  #653  
Old 17.08.2008, 20:48
Tilia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,746
Groaned at 75 Times in 42 Posts
Thanked 2,649 Times in 1,194 Posts
Tilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Haha, we just discussed that Swiss peculiarity today in the car and simply decided that today is the day to do as the locals


Quote:
View Post
I'd be interested to know what advice the Swiss equivalent of the Highway Code gives for waiting at traffic junctions. Over the past few days I have encountered quite a few drivers (all Swiss obviously) that seem to think that they should only wait as long as they want to before pulling out. It doesn't matter if there is any other traffic on the road, simply adopt your favourite ski lift attitude and get yourself on to the road. The annoying thing is that on at least two occasions there was no car behind me, so simply waiting a few seconds more would give them a clear road to attack. But apparently it's much more fun to push in then it is to wait your turn. W@nkers, the lot of em.
Reply With Quote
  #654  
Old 17.08.2008, 20:54
Tilia's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: ZH
Posts: 2,746
Groaned at 75 Times in 42 Posts
Thanked 2,649 Times in 1,194 Posts
Tilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond reputeTilia has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Oh, don't I know it! I have told about my experience here on EF before about a walk in Einsiedeln where I had to squeeze in between two women (ladies is not the appropriate word here) and got yelled at as being unpolite when I dared give them a bit of a glare while I did it.


Quote:
View Post
I spent time outside of Switzerland recently. I returned and was cycling on the Uetliberg the other day and the following riddle suggested itself to me:
---
Two Swiss people are walking along a path 3 meters wide. Which side will they walk on?

"All of them"
---
Still working on the setup, but I get laughs from every expat I've tried it out on.

I cannot for the life of me figure this out. In most parts of the world people will stay right, and pass left. I make allowances for "stay left" people and assume they are from the UK or other lefty-locales, fair enough. But pick a side, any side, sort of stay there and people will go around.
Reply With Quote
  #655  
Old 17.08.2008, 21:52
nickatbasel's Avatar
Mod, Chips and Mushy Peas
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Albisrieden
Posts: 5,313
Groaned at 160 Times in 98 Posts
Thanked 8,352 Times in 3,094 Posts
nickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond reputenickatbasel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I've noticed that a lot more people in Switzerland wear glasses than in the UK.
Excluding football referees.

Cheers,
Nick
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank nickatbasel for this useful post:
  #656  
Old 18.08.2008, 00:57
Gav's Avatar
Gav Gav is offline
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Ireland
Posts: 966
Groaned at 15 Times in 11 Posts
Thanked 468 Times in 187 Posts
Gav has a reputation beyond reputeGav has a reputation beyond reputeGav has a reputation beyond reputeGav has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I'd be interested to know what advice the Swiss equivalent of the Highway Code gives for waiting at traffic junctions. Over the past few days I have encountered quite a few drivers (all Swiss obviously) that seem to think that they should only wait as long as they want to before pulling out. It doesn't matter if there is any other traffic on the road, simply adopt your favourite ski lift attitude and get yourself on to the road. The annoying thing is that on at least two occasions there was no car behind me, so simply waiting a few seconds more would give them a clear road to attack. But apparently it's much more fun to push in then it is to wait your turn. W@nkers, the lot of em.
Are you sure that you got the 'right of way' thing right? IIRC the car coming from the right hand road has priority (if they are turning right) unless the road is otherwise marked. That's irrespective of the size of the road. Leads to a lot of near misses..... it's pretty bonkers.
Reply With Quote
  #657  
Old 18.08.2008, 09:12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Paris
Posts: 49
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 13 Times in 7 Posts
Bricin has no particular reputation at present
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
You have rather answered your own question here. See the parts I have made bold. On walking paths, however wide and on the Uetliberg they are wide as many people walk there, there is no rule which side you walk on and cycling is generally forbidden...
I said they were walking, not that they were on a walking path. Most of the paths along the Uetliberg are signed for cycling as well. And being the good rule-abiding person I am I would of course never cycle on a walking-only path.

And whether there is a *rule* or not, common courtesy would indicate that picking a side so that people moving faster could easily go by is nice. Not required. But nice.
Reply With Quote
  #658  
Old 18.08.2008, 14:24
Mikey's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ex-Zurich now relieved
Posts: 650
Groaned at 18 Times in 16 Posts
Thanked 473 Times in 245 Posts
Mikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond reputeMikey has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
Are you sure that you got the 'right of way' thing right? IIRC the car coming from the right hand road has priority (if they are turning right) unless the road is otherwise marked. That's irrespective of the size of the road. Leads to a lot of near misses..... it's pretty bonkers.
Yeah, I'm very familiar with driving over here and none of them were recht-vortritt (give way to the right). These people had just decided that they'd waited for long enough.
Reply With Quote
  #659  
Old 18.08.2008, 15:22
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: zürich
Posts: 3,194
Groaned at 105 Times in 79 Posts
Thanked 3,987 Times in 1,625 Posts
i-b-deborah has a reputation beyond reputei-b-deborah has a reputation beyond reputei-b-deborah has a reputation beyond reputei-b-deborah has a reputation beyond reputei-b-deborah has a reputation beyond reputei-b-deborah has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Swiss Manners

I used to get really harassed by cars behind me when I first started driving here in Ch. I got my licence in Australia, where the driving culture is totally diffferent. For example, in Oz, when joining the flow of traffic, it's more customary to wait for a decent gap in the traffic before you cut in. You are considered a bit over-eager if you don't and will probably get a horn or the finger for your efforts. Here, the opposit is true, if you dont go at the smallest chance you are considered too slow and people will get annoyed. I like English drivers, of all the one's I've shared the roads with. Their style of flashing lights to give right of way in crowded streets was for me the height of civility.
__________________
Shark wisdom: A swimmer in the sea is worth ten on the beach.
Reply With Quote
  #660  
Old 18.08.2008, 15:40
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Swiss Manners

Quote:
View Post
I used to get really harassed by cars behind me when I first started driving here in Ch. I got my licence in Australia, where the driving culture is totally diffferent. For example, in Oz, when joining the flow of traffic, it's more customary to wait for a decent gap in the traffic before you cut in. You are considered a bit over-eager if you don't and will probably get a horn or the finger for your efforts. Here, the opposit is true, if you dont go at the smallest chance you are considered too slow and people will get annoyed. I like English drivers, of all the one's I've shared the roads with. Their style of flashing lights to give right of way in crowded streets was for me the height of civility.
Unfortunately it doesn't work here in Switzerland - I let some driver in from a sliproad by flashing my lights UK-stylie and he responded by giving me the stinky finger in his rearview mirror then doing the "tap-the-forehead-as-if-you-are-mental" thing.

My bestest reaction in situations like that is to ignore the idiot or, if I am feeling particularly naughty, to blow them a big kiss...

I have since got more savvy and let them find their own s*dding gap in the traffic...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
magic roundabout, manners, rude, smile back, spleen venting, staring




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello some questions about swiss life and Swiss men from an Irish girl lou.m Daily life 44 03.03.2015 12:30
Language and table manners, or Language Integration in Switzerland is Painful sonnyk Language corner 70 14.11.2011 00:08
Non Swiss, married to Swiss, what visa? Curious George Permits/visas/government 1 21.11.2007 10:57


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:56.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0