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  #21  
Old 18.06.2008, 09:09
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Re: Management newspeak

I have an aversion to anything that avoids describing the derivation (unless referenced to the appendix) and skips over the interesting bit.

"It can be shown that..."
"Hence...."
"Thus...."
"Empirically.."
"Which can be represented as..."

It means the reader (if they can be bothered) is required to either to take it on faith (bad idea) or spend significant time inserting the missing links.

dave


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Hmmm.... i would suspect you are reading a something done by folks influenced by latin languages. It is direct translation from an expression that is used quite often in technical jargon. Basically, they mean that within an universe of compounds, that one specifically shows....Of course XXXX shows, but the author feel the need of giving a broader definition of the compound.

Like in fruit, namely bananas, has a lot of magnesium - which is a bit different than bananas have a lot of magnesium.

It is just a completely different way of structuring setences... Other than this, we are normal
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  #22  
Old 18.06.2008, 09:18
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Re: Management newspeak

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I have an aversion to anything that avoids describing the derivation (unless referenced to the appendix) and skips over the interesting bit.

"It can be shown that..."
"Hence...."
"Thus...."
"Empirically.."
"Which can be represented as..."

It means the reader (if they can be bothered) is required to either to take it on faith (bad idea) or spend significant time inserting the missing links.

dave
^ this with bells on.

"It follows that..." Follows from what? Oh yeah, that 250-page textbook...
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  #23  
Old 21.08.2008, 10:31
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Re: Management newspeak

Since this is Castro's thread... he has just given us a new offering of bizarro management speak on this thread: Hotels online, bargains

Aggranulates



I must give that one to one of my Project Manager's to use along with Low Hanging Fruit
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  #24  
Old 21.08.2008, 10:48
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Re: Management newspeak

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Since this is Castro's thread... he has just given us a new offering of bizarro management speak on this thread: Hotels online, bargains

Aggranulates



I must give that one to one of my Project Manager's to use along with Low Hanging Fruit
Thats such a niche bit of management BS that I can't even find it on google Perhaps I meant Hotel agglomerater???

I'm sure I've heard a similar term used before for those price gathering websites e.g. toppreise
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  #25  
Old 22.04.2011, 22:54
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Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

Am I the only one that gets irritated when I hear:

"reach out" and other such jargon used in in the business world?

Do you have any "pet hates" among the phrases people use in business that have little to do with economics over and over again? maybe we can get a list together and even find some new ones to avoid.
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  #26  
Old 22.04.2011, 23:43
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

I'm sure there must be thousands of phrases in the business world that have little or nothing to do with economics, such as "Please clean the restroom," "No dogs allowed," "Click on Tools and select Settings," to name just a few.
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  #27  
Old 23.04.2011, 01:10
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

http://www.misterharold.net/cgi-bin/bingogen.pl




Classic Buzzword Bingo


Do you keep falling asleep in meetings and seminars? What about those long
and boring conference calls? Here is a way to change all of that!

How to play: Check off each block when you hear these words during a
meeting, seminar, or phone call. When you have checked off a whole line
horizontally, vertically, or diagonally, stand up and shout BINGO!


Card 1






Challenge
Empower
Mindset
Result-Driven
Bottom-Line

Bandwidth
Proactive
Leverage
Think Outside the Box
Knowledge Base

Revisit
Total Quality
Value-Added
Hardball
Synergy

Client Focus[ed]
Game Plan
Win-Win
Touch Base
Benchmark

Best Practice
Strategic Fit
Ball Park
Gap Analysis
Out of the Loop



This is your own unique bingo card. It contains 25 words/phrases out of a
possible 27. Other people will have different words, and word arrangements.
Print this out, and have fun!
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  #28  
Old 23.04.2011, 02:07
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

Is it just me, or did anyone else's heart sink when the OP's post appeared? This discussion has been recycled a million times on the media, and on every forum going for (what seems like) years.

Will we ever tire of it?
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  #29  
Old 23.04.2011, 09:24
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

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  #30  
Old 23.04.2011, 09:24
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

Touch base makes my skin crawl
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  #31  
Old 23.04.2011, 09:36
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

I do wish people would leverage the search functionality to fully synergise the previous threads. Let's not reinvent the wheel folks.
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  #32  
Old 23.04.2011, 09:38
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

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Touch base makes my skin crawl
It always makes me think of "touching cloth".
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  #33  
Old 23.04.2011, 10:02
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

I like phrases like

"We have to focus ....... and to optimize ....... in order to improve the shareholders-value "

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  #34  
Old 23.04.2011, 11:13
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Re: Management newspeak

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=50 office-speak phrases you love to hate =



Lucy Kellaway's article against boss speak


Management speak - don't you just hate it? Emphatically yes, judging by readers' responses to writer Lucy Kellaway's campaign against office jargon (see link, right). Here, we list 50 of the best, worst examples.

1. "When I worked for Verizon, I found the phrase going forward to be more sinister than annoying. When used by my boss - sorry, "team leader" - it was understood to mean that the topic of conversation was at an end and not be discussed again."
Nima Nassefat, Vancouver, Canada

2. "My employers (top half of FTSE 100) recently informed staff that we are no longer allowed to use the phrase brain storm because it might have negative connotations associated with fits. We must now take idea showers. I think that says it all really."
Anonymous, England

3. At my old company (a US multinational), anyone involved with a particular product was encouraged to be a product evangelist. And software users these days, so we hear, want to be platform atheists so that their computers will run programs from any manufacturer."
Philip Lattimore, Thailand

4. "Incentivise is the one that does it for me."
Karl Thomas, Perth, Scotland

5. "My favourite which I hear from the managers at the bank I work for is let's touch base about that offline. I think it means have a private chat but I am still not sure."
Gemma, Wolverhampton, England

6. "Have you ever heard the term loop back which means go back to an associate and deal with them?"
Scott Reed, Lakeland, Florida, US

7-8. "We used to collect the jargon used in a list and award the person with the most at the end of the year. The winner was a client manager with the classic you can't turn a tanker around with a speed boat change. What? Second was we need a holistic, cradle-to-grave approach, whatever that is."
Turner, Manchester

9. "Until recently I had to suffer working for a manager who used phrases such as the idiotic I've got you in my radar in her speech, letters and e-mails. Once, when I mentioned problems with the phone system, she screamed 'NO! You don't have problems, you have challenges'. At which point I almost lost the will to live."
Stephen Gradwick, Liverpool

10. "You can add challenge to the list. Problems are no longer considered problems, they have morphed into challenges."
Irene MacIntyre, Courtenay, B

11. "Business speak even supersedes itself and does so with silliness, the shorthand for quick win is now low hanging fruit."
Paul, Formby, UK

12. "And looking under the bonnet."
Eve Russell, Edinburgh

13-14. "The business-speak that I abhor is pre-prepare and forward planning. Is there any other kind of preparedness or planning?"
Edward Creswick, Exeter

15-16. "The one that really gets me is pre-plan - there is no such thing. Either you plan or you don't. The new one which has got my goat is conversate, widely used to describe a conversation. I just wish people could learn to 'think outside the box' although when they put us in cubes what do they expect?"
Malcolm, Houston

17. "I work in one of those humble call centres for a bank. Apparently, what we're doing at the moment is sprinkling our magic along the way. It's a call centre, not Hogwarts."
Caroline Garlick, Ayrshire

18. "A pet hate is the utterly pointless expression in this space. So instead of the perfectly adequate 'how can I help?' it's 'how can I help in this space?' Or the classic I heard on Friday, 'How can we help our customers in this space going forward?' I think I may have caught this expression at source, as I've yet to hear it said outside my own working environment. So I'm on a personal crusade to stamp it out before it starts infecting other City institutions. Wish me luck in this space."
Colin, London

19. "The one phrase that inspires a rage in me is from the get-go."
Andy, Herts

20. "'Going forward' is only half the phrase that gets up my nose - all politicians seem to use the phrase go forward together. 'We must... we shall... let us now... go forward together'. It gives me a terrible mental image of the whole country linking arms and goose-stepping in unison, with the politicians out in front doing a straight-armed salute. Is it just me?"
Frances Smith, Toronto, Canada

21. "I am a financial journalist and am on a mission to remove words and phrases such as 360-degree thinking from existence."
Richard, London

22. "The latest that's stuck in my head is we are still optimistic things will feed through the sales and delivery pipeline (ie: we actually haven't sold anything to anyone yet but maybe we will one day)."
Alexander, Southampton

23. "I worked in PR for many years and often heard the most ludicrous phrases uttered by CEOs and marketing managers. One of the best was, we'd better not let the grass grow too long on this one. To this day it still echoes in my ears and I giggle to myself whenever I think about it. I can't help but think insecure business people use such phrases to cover up their inability for proper articulation."
Leon Reilly, Ealing, London

24. "Need to get all my ducks in a row now - before the five-year-olds wake up."
Mark Dixon, Bridgend

25. "Australians have started to use auspice as a verb. Instead of saying, 'under the auspices of...', some people now say things like, it was auspiced by..."
Martin Pooley, Marrickville, Australia

26. "My favourite: we've got our fingers down the throat of the organisation of that nodule. Translation = Er, no, WE sorted out the problems to cover your backside."
Theo de Bray, Kettering, UK

27. "The health service in Wales is filled with managers who use this type of language as a substitute for original thought. At meetings we play health-speak bingo; counting the key words lightens the tedium of meetings - including, most recently, my door is open on this issue. What does that mean?"
Edwin Pottle, Llandudno

28-29. "The business phrase I find most irritating is close of play, which is only slightly worse than actioning something."
Ellie, London

30. "Here in the US we have the cringe-worthy and also in addition. Then there's the ever-eloquent 'where are we at?' So far, I haven't noticed the UK's at the end of the day prefacing much over here; thank heavens for small mercies."
Eithne B, Chicago, US

31. "The expression that drives me nuts is 110%, usually said to express passion/commitment/support by people who are not very good at maths. This has created something of a cliche-inflation, where people are now saying 120%, 200%, or if you are really REALLY committed, 500%. I remember once the then-chancellor Gordon Brown saying he was 101% behind Tony Blair, to which people reacted 'What? Only 101?'"
Ricardo Molina, London, UK

32. "My least favourite business-speak term is not enough bandwidth. When an employee used this term to refuse an additional assignment, I realised I was completely 'out of the loop'."
April, Berkeley, US

33. "I once had a boss who said, 'You can't have your cake and eat it, so you have to step up to the plate and face the music.' It was in that moment I knew I had to resign before somebody got badly hurt by a pencil."
Tim, Durban

34. "Capture your colleagues - make sure everyone attends that risk management workshop (compulsory common sense training for idiots)."
Anglowelsh, UK

35-37. "We too used to have daily paradigm shifts, now we have stakeholders who must come to the party or be left out, or whatever."
Barry Hicks, Cape Town, RSA

38. "I have taken to playing buzzword bingo when in meetings. It certainly makes it more entertaining when I am feeding it back (or should that be cascading) at work."
Ian Everett, Bolton

39. "In my work environment it's all cascading at the moment. What they really mean is to communicate or disseminate information, usually downwards. What they don't seem to appreciate is that it sounds like we're being wee'd on. Which we usually are."
LMD, London

40. "At a large media company where I once worked, the head of human resources - itself a weaselly neologism for personnel - told us that she would be cascading down new information to staff. What she meant was she was going to send them a memo. It was one of the reasons I resigned - that, and the fact that the chief exec persisted on referring to the company as a really cool train set."
Andrew, London

41. "Working for an American corporation, this year's favourite word seems to be granularity, meaning detail. As in 'down to that level of granularity'."
Chris Daniel, Anaco, Venezuela

42. "On the wall of our office we have a large signed certificate, signed by all the senior management team, in which they solemnly promise to leverage their talents, display and inspire 'unyielding integrity', and lots of other pretentious buzz-phrases like that. Clueless, the lot of them."
Chris K, Cheltenham UK

43. "After a reduction in workforce, my university department sent this notice out to confused campus customers: 'Thank you for your note. We are assessing and mitigating immediate impacts, and developing a high-level overview to help frame the conversation with our customers and key stakeholders. We intend to start that process within the week. In the meantime, please continue to raise specific concerns or questions about projects with my office via the Transition Support Center..."
Charles R, Seattle, Washington, US

44. "I was told I'd be living the values from now on by my employers at a conference the other week. Here's some modern language for them - meh. A shame as I strongly believe in much of what my employers aim to do. I refuse to adopt the voluntary sectors' client title of 'service user'. How is someone who won't so much as open the door to me using my service? Another case of using four syllables where one would do."
Upscaled Blue-Sky thinker, Cardiff

45. "Business talk 2.0 is maddening, meaningless, patronising and I despise it."
Doug, London

46. "Lately I've come across the strategic staircase. What on earth is this? I'll tell you; it's office speak for a bit of a plan for the future. It's not moving on but moving up. How strategic can a staircase really be? A lot I suppose, if you want to get to the top without climbing over all your colleagues."
Peter Walters, Cheadle Hulme, UK

47. "When a stock market is down why must we be told it is in negative territory?"
Phil Linehan, Mexico City, Mexico

48. "The particular phrase I love to hate is drill down, which handily can be used either as an adverb/verb combo or as a compound noun, ie: 'the next level drill-down', sometimes even in the same sentence - a nice bit of multi-tasking."
B, London

49. "Thanks for the impactful article; I especially appreciated the level of granularity. A high altitude view often misses the siloed thinking typical of most businesses. Absent any scheme for incentivitising clear speech, however, I'm afraid we're stuck with biz-speak."
Timothy Denton, New York

50. "It wouldn't do the pinstripers any harm to crack a smile and say what they really felt once in a while instead of trotting out such clinical platitudes. Of course a group of them may need to workshop it first: Wouldn't want to wrongside the demographic."
Trick Cyclist, Tripoli, Libya

That was brilliant.
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  #35  
Old 23.04.2011, 11:39
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

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Is it just me, or did anyone else's heart sink when the OP's post appeared? This discussion has been recycled a million times on the media, and on every forum going for (what seems like) years.

Will we ever tire of it?
No.
(plus 8 more characters)
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  #36  
Old 23.04.2011, 11:39
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Re: Management newspeak

Blue sky thinking
Thought grenades
Upstream
Run that by you

Bah!
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  #37  
Old 23.04.2011, 11:44
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

At this point in time ...... my pet hate is anything to do with "pushing the envelope."

I do rather like "put all your ducks in a row" along with "box of fluffy ducks." It took years of me saying that around the world, before someone responded with "Oh, what's wrong?" for me to realise that it was a definite colloquialism that I had grown up with, eh.
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  #38  
Old 23.04.2011, 13:08
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Re: Annoying business jargon - which irritate you?

"Low hanging fruits" does not have a German equivalent. So I can't even avoid the phrase during most German meetings.

And "peanuts" (used while speaking English or German) to refer to a problem which is insignificant. I never heard this in the U.S., but due to some commercial (never actually saw it), it just won't go away.
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Old 23.04.2011, 17:50
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Re: Management newspeak

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That was brilliant.
quoting 88 lines and adding one line of comment was not ...!
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Old 23.04.2011, 18:44
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Re: Management newspeak

Does anyone else's skin crawl when they hear the term "business partner"? It just seems to mean a middleman who gets in the way, adds a level of bureaucracy, prevents you from talking to the person to whom you really need to talk to get the job done, and generally slows things down.

Though of course it's all done in the name of efficiency...
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