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  #221  
Old 05.07.2007, 21:24
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Re: Food in Switzerland

uhhhh, personally i don't find food in switzerland soooo bad, in fact you can eat almost in every city good italian, french, spanish or chinese dishes, not to mention the extraordinary chicken kebab from "new point" in zürich. swiss cooking is anothers story, out of fondue and racclette (specialties i like very much) there is nothing else, but raw meat or dried-to-steel salamis from graubünden.
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  #222  
Old 06.07.2007, 01:24
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Hey, I agree, apart from the bad Röesti I had in Basel, I find the food not too bad here. And I agree with Exoticlactic, that the "papet vaudois", (now that I know what it's called!) is great. I certainly never tasted it before - and never even knew what it was called, (had it at various family do's, and then have been cooking it for my family for the 7 years we have been here - no name brand ha, ha!)
People should all STOP complaining about the food here - it is no worse than anywhere else. Sure, there is a lot of Italian, but even that is not so bad - there are some great restaurants serving it. There are a LOT of Italians here! If it were so bad, they would all be complaining. (No, they are cleverer, they open their own restaurants!)
When we went to eat in France recently, the food was quite poor - and they are supposed to be THE connaiseurs of all time!
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  #223  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:11
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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swiss cooking is anothers story, out of fondue and racclette (specialties i like very much) there is nothing else, but raw meat or dried-to-steel salamis from graubünden.
***step on soapbox***

I beg to differ,Swiss Cuisine does exist and it can be very yummy,but if one always follows the beaten path and only eats out in restaurants ( and then particularly foreign cuisine) then it's no wonder one thinks our food is bland and not very original,this way you have no chance to get to know the real swiss cuisine.

The cuisine may be simple sometimes,because Switzerland was/is basically a farmers country and apart from the gentry in the cities ,people were quite poor.
The original swiss cuisine is very much in tune with what nature offers and what's in season.
Original ingredients may have been basic,very basic indeed,but out of it originated many local, and believe it or not, TASTY specialities.

I researched swiss cuisine for almost all my life, since I was old enough to cook,about 30 years ago........

So there really is more to it than cheese,dried meat and chocolates

*** step off soapbox***
cheers
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  #224  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:16
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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***step on soapbox***

I beg to differ,Swiss Cuisine does exist and it can be very yummy,but if one always follows the beaten path and only eats out in restaurants ( and then particularly foreign cuisine) then it's no wonder one thinks our food is bland and not very original,this way you have no chance to get to know the real swiss cuisine.

The cuisine may be simple sometimes,because Switzerland was/is basically a farmers country and apart from the gentry in the cities ,people were quite poor.
The original swiss cuisine is very much in tune with what nature offers and what's in season.
Original ingredients may have been basic,very basic indeed,but out of it originated many local, and believe it or not, TASTY specialities.

I researched swiss cuisine for almost all my life, since I was old enough to cook,about 30 years ago........

So there really is more to it than cheese,dried meat and chocolates

*** step off soapbox***
cheers
But you don't say what. Maybe steamed cuckoo clocks with roast watches served up on a bed of banknotes with a light dusting of dental gold.
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  #225  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:20
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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uhhhh, personally i don't find food in switzerland soooo bad, in fact you can eat almost in every city good italian, french, spanish or chinese dishes, not to mention the extraordinary chicken kebab from "new point" in zürich. swiss cooking is anothers story, out of fondue and racclette (specialties i like very much) there is nothing else, but raw meat or dried-to-steel salamis from graubünden.
A range of cheeses and cured meats that stands against most in the world, a small but excellent selection of prime vegetables and fruits, excellent regional specialities...come on man, step out of your confort zone, stop being so Swiss and go discover, give a try to fritures de carpes in Jura, a good longeole in Geneva, a risotto in Ticino or a nice plate of pizzocheri in Graubunden
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  #226  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:22
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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But you don't say what. Maybe steamed cuckoo clocks with roast watches served up on a bed of banknotes with a light dusting of dental gold.
You should try adding some mint sauce on top of it, it might satisfy your delicate British palate. Or maybe a dash of HP sauce...
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  #227  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:24
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Here some delicious foods you should have tried at least once before you write mean things about swiss cooking. :-)

Luzerner Chögelipastete
Schweinsbratwurst mit Zwiebelsauce und Rösti
Hacktätschli
Hörnli mit Hackfleisch
Filet im Teig
Fisch nach Zuger Art
Älplermagronen.

Some receipes you can find on my homepage here. (german)

If you don't like any of the above, then I don't know what to do with you.

But then again, who likes vinegar and french fries and warm beer??? yuk!



Bon Appetit!

Christian
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  #228  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:37
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Actually I do like vinegar on my chips and the beer is not warm but served at around 14c to fully devellop the flavours.

The only reason to drink a beer ice cold is to numb your palate to avoid tasting it, which in the case of a Feld or Carlsberg is a smart move indeed
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  #229  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:42
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Re: Food in Switzerland

LOL maybe I can convince you that the swiss cooking isn't as bad as it's made here and you can introduce me to the art of english beer-drinking. :-)
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  #230  
Old 06.07.2007, 10:45
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Oh but I'm Swiss old chap, I've been living in England for a while so got used to their quaint customs and in fact grown to like them
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  #231  
Old 06.07.2007, 11:22
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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But you don't say what. Maybe steamed cuckoo clocks with roast watches served up on a bed of banknotes with a light dusting of dental gold.

hehehe Can't resist a challenge when it comes to swiss food

These dishes may still be simple and hearty, but prepared right,they are full of flavour and yummy!

I only name a few here ( and all of them can be 'googled' in case you want to know more)

Original Treberwurst from the vintners on the shores of Lake of Bienne
Maluns,Capuns and Plain in Pigna from Grison alps
All the various fish specialites around all the Lakes and rivers in Switzerland ( and I don't mean perch frits or meunière )
Schnitz und drunder from Argovian cuisines
Fribourgs Soupe de Chalet and tarte au vin cuit
Zuger Kirschtorte and Zuger Röteli
Luzerner Chügelipastete
Gâteau à la Crème from the Mont Vully Region
Cholera and Sii, from the Valais
Papet Vaudois
and for those who are 'meaties' the Bernese Platter,the Cochonaille, the Metzgete........

....and there are a gazillion more foods that I simply can not list,but if you look for it , you'll be surprised how much swiss cuisine can offer!
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  #232  
Old 06.07.2007, 11:37
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Hop on sopabox again.......

That's another bugbear of mine,the reduction of countries to their cuisine and all the prejudices that then stem from that!!
E.g. Amis only eat fast food,British cuisine is not platable as is the Polish cuisine.This is simply not true!

America is not only KFC and Burger King, same as Scots don't eat all the time deep fried Mars bars ;-) and Haggis,nor will a German live on Sauerkraut and Eisbein.

Agreed that these are maybe the 'famous' foods one hears about, but if one would take the time and delve deeper into a countries origins of its traditional food and food history,one would be very nicely surprised at the findings!

So give yourself a push and go off the beaten path, the next time you venture to another country ....
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  #233  
Old 06.07.2007, 12:01
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Re: Food in Switzerland

I love the food here! I can be a food snob sometimes but guys! Come on! the chickens here are a piece of heaven melting in your mouth!!! I never ever had such a good chicken! My wife prepares them with olive oil, freshly squeezed lemon and "herbs" I swear! no chateaux relais can compare to this!
I think the food is amazing, however, sometimes I miss my Mexican food, (some good guacamole) and not that crappy powder they give you here.
The food in Switzerland is very good in restaurants too. Small portions, but still great!
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  #234  
Old 06.07.2007, 12:33
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Today article is about an Italian chap in canton Vaud who sells his specialities in the markets of Lausanne and Renens. If you are after mozzarella, bourrate, ricotta and the likes, he is your man.

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Giovanni, tourneur de mozzarella


Débarqué en Suisse à 18 ans pour travailler à l'usine, le Molisan dirige aujourd'hui une petite entreprise à Ropraz (VD), où il affine ses fromages dans la plus pure tradition italienne.


Marco Danesi
Vendredi 6 juillet 2007

Mozzarella, fromages frais et ricotta débarquent en fin de journée. Dans son dépôt à Crissier, près de Lausanne, Giovanni Padula déchire les emballages. Il tâte la pâte diaphane, lisse et élastique. Il goûte. C'est tiède, ça sent la vache et le lait en fleur (fior di latte).
Les jours de marché, à Lausanne et Renens, les petites miches attirent les amoureux des saveurs italiennes. Au milieu de caciocavallo, scamorze et autres miracles de la cuisine transalpine. Giovanni Padula, à la tête d'une PME familiale, importe ces trésors au lait cru. Mais il en fabrique également. C'est pourquoi il exploite avec un associé une fromagerie à Ropraz, dans le Jorat vaudois.
Pourtant, à son arrivée en Suisse en 1971, il a 18 ans, rien ne le prédestine au commerce de fromage. Mécanicien tourneur, il rejoint à Lausanne le père saisonnier. Il fraise pendant une dizaine d'années sans enthousiasme. La tâche est dure, peu gratifiante. Et il n'est pas très doué, avoue-t-il. «Je suis plutôt un intellectuel. Je n'aime pas travailler avec mes mains ni bricoler.»
De but en blanc, il décide d'abandonner l'usine. Il hésite. Les chaussures pour enfants ou le fromage? Le caciocavallo, une spécialité du Molise natal, petite région du centre-sud serrée entre les Abruzzes, la Campanie, le Latium et l'Ombrie, semble inconnu en Suisse romande. Alors il charge quelques pièces dans sa voiture, remonte la Botte, traverse la frontière et les vend auprès de la colonie italienne de la région.
A partir de janvier 1983, Giovanni Padula organise son affaire. Il achète ricottaet mozzarellaau seul fabricant artisanal du pays, installé à Dietikon, dans les environs de Zurich. Puis s'arme d'un stand pour courir les marchés. Prix bas et saveurs méditerranéennes séduisent les clients.
Les premiers temps, il stocke les produits dans sa cave. De fil en aiguille, Giovanni Padula loue un dépôt, à Crissier, et s'équipe. Toujours à ses frais. En vingt-cinq ans, il n'a jamais emprunté un seul sou. Aujourd'hui, il achète ses pièces directement en Italie, où il s'approvisionne chez un grossiste. Il livre surtout restaurants et boutiques spécialisés. Aligro est son seul gros contrat. Ainsi, il brasse chaque année 30000 à 40000 kilos de fromage. Au sens figuré, mais au sens propre aussi.
La mozzarella façonnée en Suisse n'égale pas le goût d'origine. Et, si on l'importe, le stockage devient un problème insoluble: elle s'assèche en deux ou trois jours. En 2001, avec un associé, Giovanni Padula investit 200000 francs, engage un fromager italien et s'invente un destin de producteur.
Par malheur, deux obstacles contrarient son épanouissement: le succès de la mozzarella de buffle et les habitudes alimentaires indigènes. Le lait de vache, même cru, ne satisfait pas l'envie de sensations fortes qui saisit les consommateurs. Pire: contre le bon sens et les mœurs des habitants du Molise, ils laissent traîner au frigo des morceaux qu'il faudrait manger immédiatement. Du coup, leur saveur s'affadit, poussant fatalement les clients frustrés vers des produits plus corsés.
Le rêve de réussite s'estompe un peu. Giovanni Padula se dit même un peu déçu, malgré les 100kilos hebdomadaires de mozzarella qu'il écoule. Obligé d'importer du buffle pour satisfaire la demande, il teste depuis quelque temps une production maison qui ne donne pas encore les résultats escomptés. En revanche, scamorze et ricottaroulées à Ropraz attirent les gourmets.
Sévère avec lui-même, Giovanni Padula revient sur ses échecs, sur les occasions manquées. Il aurait pu créer «un petit empire». S'agrandir, mater les concurrents. Il a préféré la prudence. La retenue. Ce qui ne l'empêche pas de chercher la nouveauté. Comme la bourrata, qu'il moule depuis peu. Une pâte ronde et déshydratée à l'extérieur, farcie de crème et de filaments de mozzarella.
Un peu seul au milieu de son dépôt, il goûte encore un nodino perlé de sel dans la lumière du soir. Au marché, la mélancolie s'essouffle. Surtout quand il raconte aux chalands, toujours prêts à l'écouter, fragrances et parfums de ses fromages.
Giovanni Padula tient un stand sur les marchés de Lausanne (les mercredis et samedis de 8h à 14h30) et de Renens (les samedis de 8h à 14h).
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  #235  
Old 06.07.2007, 12:46
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Re: Food in Switzerland

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I bet she does only expensive crap that doesn't fill your stomach and calm you appetite...
I remember when I had been in Paris and ordered some Potage des Legumes ...what was at the end? Minestrone!

Cheers
Max
I remember when I was in Milan and ordered some Minestrone... and what was at the end? Potage de Legumes...
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  #236  
Old 06.07.2007, 13:11
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Re: Food in Switzerland

I'm still at loss to understand that comment, words like "arse" and "talk" come readily to mind I have to say...
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  #237  
Old 08.07.2007, 01:00
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Last in the series, an organic butcher in Bern, the chap has very good sausages, ham, dried meats as well as antipasti, organic wines and and a few other things. His speciality is something called Drachenschwanzli aka dragon's tails, a kind of biltong/beef jerk by the description. Pretty right-on chap, he takes great care of his animals, adheres to the slow-food ideal, employs disabled or people in rehab.


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Res Bärtschi, bio et bon boucher

Amoureux des bêtes, ce grand artisan produit une viande raffinée qu'il vend au «Bernermärit» et que ses clients adorent. Pour lui, les animaux bien traités donnent une chair meilleure.




Albertine Bourget, Berne
Samedi 7 juillet 2007

Sa boucherie, à Schüpfen, à la périphérie de Berne, n'a l'air de rien d'autre qu'une petite boutique de village. Elle est pourtant connue à des lieux à la ronde; ses saucisses sont «un poème», s'enflamme Elsbeth Hobmeier, rédactrice en chef d'hotel+ tourismusrevue et spécialiste de gastronomie.

Le samedi, les habitués se pressent au stand que tient Res Bärtschi à la Münstergasse de Berne. Pour se procurer le Hamme, jambon maison, différents assortiments de viande mis à sécher pendant deux à trois semaines à un mois, ou encore les antipasti, olives ou tomates séchées qui sont préparées sur place, par une équipe de six ouvriers. Les bidons d'huile d'olive sont sagement alignés au-dessous de brochures vantant les mérites du slow food. Egalement proposés, des vins biologiques. La fureur du moment: les Drachenschwänzli (queues de dragon), soit de fins morceaux de viande de bœuf fumée dont les Bernois se régalent à l'apéritif.

Le bio, Res Bärtschi, aujourd'hui âgé de 50ans, en fait depuis vingt-cinq ans. «A l'époque, on ne savait même pas ce que c'était», raconte-t-il dans un mince sourire. Ce qui lui vaut le surnom de «pionnier du bio» dans les environs. Il a grandi auprès de parents eux-mêmes bouchers, dans une famille qui aimait les animaux, et vit toujours avec chien et chat. Et, il en est persuadé, les animaux bien traités donnent une viande meilleure. «S'ils sont maltraités, l'hormone de stress qu'ils produisent amoindrit la qualité de la viande.» Ses bêtes, tuées dans l'abattoir de sa boucherie, viennent d'éleveurs locaux qu'il connaît personnellement. «Un bon boucher devrait aimer les animaux», assure-t-il, avant d'ajouter qu'il comprend «parfaitement les gens qui ne mangent pas de viande». Et que c'est toujours difficile pour lui d'abattre ses bêtes.

Lui aime trop la bonne chère pour devenir végétarien. Et il est toujours à la recherche de nouveaux produits. L'idée des antipasti lui est venue de ses nombreux voyages. Italie, Grèce... Quand nous l'avons rencontré, il s'apprêtait à passer quelques jours dans le Piémont avec des amis également amateurs de bons plats: ses vacances de rêve. «J'adore aller sur les marchés, découvrir les spécialités locales, voir ce qui se fait de nouveau.» Contrairement à ce que l'on pourrait penser, une boucherie doit faire attention à toujours renouveler ses étals. «Chaque année, je dois proposer de nouvelles choses, sinon les clients se lassent. Et puis pour moi aussi, c'est plus amusant.» Avant de rappeler que de nombreuses boucheries ferment les unes après les autres.

En vedette donc, les Drachenschwänzli. Quelle est cette épice qui les parfume? «Ah ça, c'est spécial», glisse-t-il. Nous n'en saurons pas plus. Res Bärtschi ne veut pas non plus s'agrandir, malgré le succès. Le fumoir reste de taille modeste. «Les produits de masse» ne l'intéressent pas. Les restaurants qu'il fournit, à Fribourg, Berne et Bienne, il en connaît bien les propriétaires, devenus des amis.

Comme les clients du Bernermärit. Si le samedi est la plus grosse journée de la semaine, avec le chargement des produits dès 5heures du matin, c'est également son moment favori de la semaine. «J'apprécie le contact avec les clients; j'en connais la plupart depuis longtemps», glisse-t-il.

Dans sa boutique, Res Bärtschi emploie également des gens en difficulté, toxicomanes ou handicapés qui viennent lui donner un coup de main de temps en temps. «Sinon, ils seraient dans la rue», balaie-t-il. S'il adore son métier, il rêve toujours d'ailleurs et de se lancer dans une nouvelle entreprise. Par exemple? «Ouvrir un refuge pour animaux.»

Res Bärtschi tient un stand au marché de Berne le samedi, Münstergasse.


Metzgerei und Comestibles, Leiernstrasse 5, 3054 Schüpfen (BE), ouvert le vendredi de 8h à 12h et de 13h30 à 18h.
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  #238  
Old 08.07.2007, 19:05
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Re: Food in Switzerland

I think if all you know of Swiss food is Roesti and fondue, you haven't really discovered the variety of Swiss food. I love Swiss food, there are so many great things to make out there. Betty Bossi, for example, is a cookbook series (in German) that shows off some of the diversity of Swiss food. They even have some books on very traditional Swiss food, to more modern cuisine. Homecooking is always going to be different that what you get in touristy restaurants.
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  #239  
Old 08.07.2007, 19:46
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Re: Food in Switzerland

Where have you been eating? I have no complaints about Swiss food and my friends and family who've visited don't have either.
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  #240  
Old 09.07.2007, 00:44
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Re: Food in Switzerland

This chap at USA Today seemed impressed by you find in Vaud:

Quote:

Swiss region serves up food with star power
By Jerry Shriver, USA TODAY
Cutting-edge Spanish cuisine and the masterful chefs of France and Italy usually dominate discussions of Europe's fine-dining scene. But a small, tradition-bound section of a quiet neighboring country also deserves a place at the table these days, according to the influential Michelin guides to gastronomy and hospitality.
In the western part of Switzerland lies a French-speaking area called the canton of Vaud that has emerged as a mini dining mecca during the past decade. Though the canton (similar to a U.S. state) is roughly the size of diminutive Delaware, it is home to 16 of the country's 96 Michelin-starred restaurants, including the two highest-rated. The 2005 Michelin Guide Suisse recognizes more noteworthy eateries in the Vaud than in any of the other 25 cantons (Geneva is second with 11).
"The Vaud has one of highest densities of fine food on the planet. It is nothing less," declares Jacques-Olivier Chauvin, CEO of Paris-based Relais & Chateaux, an international association of luxury hotels and restaurants that has six properties in the Vaud, including five Michelin-starred restaurants.
That's high praise for a restaurant community in a country that lacks a distinctive cuisine and is known mainly for chocolate and cheese. But veteran gastronomes know that western Switzerland has a long legacy of world-class hospitality — Cesar Ritz, the famous hotelier, and Fredy Girardet, one of the 20th century's most influential French chefs, both made their names in the area.
Over the years, chefs in the Vaud have become as passionate about preserving French cooking traditions as their counterparts to the west.
"In the canton of Vaud people respect history, yet they are welcoming of newcomers. It is unique, really," says Chauvin.
The Vaud dining scene reflects that attitude. At the top are two restaurants that have been ranked among the world's best for decades: Philippe Rochat's Hotel de Ville in Crissier (the successor to Girardet's restaurant) and Gerard Rabaey's Le Pont de Brent near Montreux. They are the only two restaurants in Switzerland to hold Michelin's highest three-star rating.
The Vaud also is home to three two-star restaurants and 11 one-star restaurants. Four of the one-stars are in Lausanne, including the latest place to receive the honor, La Rotonde in the Beau-Rivage Palace hotel on the shores of Lake Geneva. The chef, 31-year-old Florian Giraud, was able to win a star after just three years in the kitchen.
"He used to be a very complicated chef. Now his style is very simple," says Beau-Rivage spokeswoman Vanessa Bourquard, who notes that his approach is similar to other young chefs in the area. "He doesn't like to transform food too much. He lets a carrot be a carrot."
Chefs such as Giraud are drawn to the area by a variety of factors, including wine, wealth, world travelers and world-class produce.
"The eastern side of Lake Geneva has a lot of wineries, and there is a huge culture around wine," says Bourquard. "And with that comes gastronomy," she says. The lake area also is home to numerous luxury hotels, many dating to the 19th century.
In addition, Lausanne is an international business center that draws a wealthy clientele. The International Olympic Committee has headquarters there, as do Nestlé, Philip Morris and Unilever.
"This part of Switzerland is an incredible crossroads, one of the most traveled places in Europe," says Chauvin. "There is a great tradition of doing business around the table and showing the cuisine to people visiting."
The cuisine on display is primarily modern French, rendered with a sensibility that rejects most global influences and reveres fresh, high-quality products from the area. "These clever chefs understand that people aren't coming to Switzerland to taste things from Asia or elsewhere," says Chauvin. "There is a real desire for authenticity and simplicity."
In the case of western Switzerland, authenticity refers to smoked meats, veal and eggs from nearby Mount Blanc, fish from Lake Geneva, organic produce and crisp wines. "The Vaud is one of the rare places on the planet where you consistently find absolutely great products," says Chauvin. "Even great sea products are brought there because of the purchasing power of the restaurants. It's fascinating how the Vaud attracts the best suppliers like a magnet."


WHERE TO GO IN SWITZERLAND
Restaurants that have been awarded stars in the 2005 Michelin Guide to Switzerland:
Three stars
Philippe Rochat at the Hotel de Ville, Crissier
Le Pont de Brent, Montreaux
Two stars
Le Cerf, Cossonay-Ville
Denis Martin, Vevey
L'Ermitage de Bernard Ravet, Vufflens-le-Château
One star
La Guillaume Tell, Aran
Auberge du Raisin, Cully
La Grappe d'Or, Lausanne
La Pomme de Pin, Lausanne
La Rotonde, Lausanne
La Table d'Edgar, Lausanne
Le Trianon, Le Mont-Pelerin
Le Jaan, Montreaux
L'Ermitage, Montreaux/Clarens
Auberge de Sugnens, Sugnens
Le Petit, Vevey/Saint Legier
Source: USA TODAY research
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/desti...iss-food_x.htm



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