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  #81  
Old 24.01.2021, 13:25
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Re: Swiss German in School

Do you watch Montalbano? We love the TV series and it was the reason we first went to Sicily- 5 visits so far and we have x crossed the Island from top to bottom and side to side. Love it. All younger people speak standard Italian and love to try their English, but especially in rural areas, if you speak standard Italian they will treat you like a 'tourist' - and older people will just stare. Montalbano TV series has subtitles in standard Italian, as Sicilian is so different.
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  #82  
Old 24.01.2021, 14:06
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Re: Swiss German in School

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DMontalbano TV series has subtitles in standard Italian.
Not on Italian or Swiss TV.

Tom
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Old 24.01.2021, 14:13
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Re: Swiss German in School

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Tomasso, how's your Sardinian?
I was once with some USian frinds in Ortisei, so I asked the waitress which language she spoke (asked the gas station dude when I arrived, "Ladin, but German is OK", se we switched to German).

My friends asked why I asked someone in Italy which language they spoke, and I pointed out that in this town, at least three Italian languages are possible.

Anyway, she was from Sardegna, and so we spoke Italian and I got great food, conversation, and service.

Years later, I was near Bolsano on a motorcycle trip with my nephew from VT, and warned him "don't speak Italian, and don't order pasta". Alas, he didn't listen, got crap food, I got great food and several free schnapps!

Meanwhile, once at a motorcycle meeting on the other side of lake Como, I was having a beer in the park at the bar, and a German guy I know asks me "how come you can understand the old guy at the bar, but we can't even though we speak good Italian" . I responded "because he's not speaking Italian, but dialect"

Tom
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Old 24.01.2021, 17:44
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Re: Swiss German in School

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I was once with some USian frinds in Ortisei, so I asked the waitress which language she spoke (asked the gas station dude when I arrived, "Ladin, but German is OK", se we switched to German).

My friends asked why I asked someone in Italy which language they spoke, and I pointed out that in this town, at least three Italian languages are possible.

Anyway, she was from Sardegna, and so we spoke Italian and I got great food, conversation, and service.

Years later, I was near Bolsano on a motorcycle trip with my nephew from VT, and warned him "don't speak Italian, and don't order pasta". Alas, he didn't listen, got crap food, I got great food and several free schnapps!

Meanwhile, once at a motorcycle meeting on the other side of lake Como, I was having a beer in the park at the bar, and a German guy I know asks me "how come you can understand the old guy at the bar, but we can't even though we speak good Italian" . I responded "because he's not speaking Italian, but dialect"

Tom
Bolsano?
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  #85  
Old 24.01.2021, 19:15
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Re: Swiss German in School

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Bolsano?
Bolzano (Bozen).

Tom
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Old 24.01.2021, 21:13
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Re: Swiss German in School

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Of course there are degrees of Swiss German - and I'd imagine, most teachers even when teaching in Swiss German (and which one?) would do so in a toned down manner- and not as if they were on the shop floor or on the farm with old school mates.

I can assure you Geordie or Scouse speak, if not toned down- or Toulouse or Auvergne- could be just as hard. Generally speaking, I do not believe that anyone should lose their regional accent totally to teach. Our welcome lecture by the Dean concentrated on telling new students that anyone with a regional accent should lose it and fast, if they want to succeed- and he had the klippiest South African accent.

In Quebec or in Mauritius, if I joined a course taught in 'French', even I would struggle- but they would sincerely not accept their French is not ... French. So when they say the course is taught in German ... But yes, I understand it would be hard, especially for anyone who doesn't already speak some form of French.
Thing is, the grammar is the same in Quebec or Newcastle (correct me if I’m wrong; I went to school among Geordies and have visited Quebec). In Swiss dialect, it is quite different from German. Only one past tense, different word order in sentences. If it‘s doable for primary school kids, it really shouldn‘t be a problem in a school OP is actually paying to attend. Every gathering of Swiss Germans I have ever attended has always switched to German when there was someone present who asked us to. It’s perfectly normal here, at least in my largely academic set - a habit picked up from being around so many languages. Refusing to do that strikes me as not only unusual but almost cruel. That, or judgmental. Really way out of line. Makes me wonder how OP put the question. If the teacher remains adamant, I‘d suggest reporting to the director.
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