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  #61  
Old 06.04.2011, 11:27
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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You're both wrong, I'm afraid.

In the 1890's, the Savoy Grill Room had a problem with one of the stoves getting too hot. This led to food being wasted and thrown away.

The head chef, Auguste Escoffier, hit upon the idea of recouping some of the lost revenue by selling this waste to other restaurant who could quickly grill the meat to reheat it and serve it to their customers.

The overcooked meat was labelled "Burnt / Bad Quality" or "BBQ" for short.

Over time "BBQ" morphed into "Barbecue" as people assumed it was a French term - what with Auguste Escoffier being French, and all.

As this "BBQ" meat became more popular, chefs around London started to deliberately burn meat to serve an increasing demand that the Savoy supply couldn't sate.

Between the wars this burnt meat was particularly popular, especially among Australian immigrants who manned the bars in these London restaurants. They wrote about the burnt meat to their relatives back home who, misunderstanding, started to burn meat on open fires.

Australian troops used to burn (or "BBQ" as the term became a verb) their rations during WWII to improve the flavour. This caught on with other allied troops and since the end of the war barbecues have been popular the world over.
Brilliant, absolutely first class
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  #62  
Old 06.04.2011, 11:44
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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In the 1890's, the Savoy Grill Room had a problem with one of the stoves getting too hot. This led to food being wasted and thrown away.
...
Australian troops used to burn (or "BBQ" as the term became a verb) their rations during WWII to improve the flavour. This caught on with other allied troops and since the end of the war barbecues have been popular the world over.
It's lucky my parents are dead, or I'd kill them for lying to me all those years!

They told me it was called a barbiequeue because of the, the, well the

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  #63  
Old 06.04.2011, 11:58
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

Isn't it just amazing how this thread got from "WC" to "BBQ"
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  #64  
Old 06.04.2011, 12:14
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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You're both wrong, I'm afraid.

In the 1890's, the Savoy Grill Room had a problem with one of the stoves getting too hot. This led to food being wasted and thrown away.

The head chef, Auguste Escoffier, hit upon the idea of recouping some of the lost revenue by selling this waste to other restaurant who could quickly grill the meat to reheat it and serve it to their customers.

The overcooked meat was labelled "Burnt / Bad Quality" or "BBQ" for short.

Over time "BBQ" morphed into "Barbecue" as people assumed it was a French term - what with Auguste Escoffier being French, and all.

As this "BBQ" meat became more popular, chefs around London started to deliberately burn meat to serve an increasing demand that the Savoy supply couldn't sate.

Between the wars this burnt meat was particularly popular, especially among Australian immigrants who manned the bars in these London restaurants. They wrote about the burnt meat to their relatives back home who, misunderstanding, started to burn meat on open fires.

Australian troops used to burn (or "BBQ" as the term became a verb) their rations during WWII to improve the flavour. This caught on with other allied troops and since the end of the war barbecues have been popular the world over.
Only 5 days late. But excellent, thank you!
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  #65  
Old 06.04.2011, 12:26
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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Isn't it just amazing how this thread got from "WC" to "BBQ"
OMGWC2BBQ!?!?!?
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  #66  
Old 06.04.2011, 13:00
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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Why do Brits use the word 'cul-de-sac' or 'ménage à trois', 'laisser-faire attitude' or, my favourite for a laugh 'a genrE'.

Why do the French use 'British words' that do not even exist in English:
footing (jogging) brushing (blow-dry) pressing (dry-cleaners) and now
wellness (direct translation of bien-ètre [should be circonflex], or even 'parking'? Languages borrow words either for ease of use, like 'pizza' or 'anorak' - or as the above to sound 'posh or better educated'.
And of course why do Brits have 1000s of bastardized French words in everyday use? Like mushroom = mousseron/ carpenter = charpentier/ plumber= plombier. Well we know this is because the Saxons found it difficult to pronounce the French imposed by the Normans, so words got distorted. Other French words changes their use over time: so a commode is not the same in France or in England (a chest of drawers in France). And other words disappeared from the French language, but remain in English, like 'reconnoitre'. Funny and fascinating things, languages. Love them.

For me the question is 'why do Americans call the WC a bathroom'?
A lot of "bastardized French words" are really separate French and English words with a common etymology - "plumber" and "plombier, for instance, both derive from "plumbum", Latin for lead.
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  #67  
Old 06.04.2011, 13:58
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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Isn't it just amazing how this thread got from "WC" to "BBQ"
Not so amazing ass you think .If you BBQ wile Pi$$t you getting shity BBQ
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  #68  
Old 06.04.2011, 19:13
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Re: WC (Water Closet)

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Not so amazing ass you think .If you BBQ wile Pi$$t you getting shity BBQ
Not to mention when you need to p|$$ while BBQing
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