Go Back   English Forum Switzerland > Living in Switzerland > Daily life  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10.09.2012, 14:31
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Zurich
Posts: 155
Groaned at 8 Times in 4 Posts
Thanked 125 Times in 66 Posts
Mary has no particular reputation at present
The sweetness of the Swiss

I know the Swiss get a lot of negative 'press' on here but I can't help
but sharing how sweet I find them too.
At the weekend we went to the Baden animated film festival and I just loved the fact that before each film, the film being shown was introduced to the audience first,sometimes in English too by someone standing in the front of the cinema..each cinema had a beautiful vase of flowers below the screen,everyone clapped at the beginning and the end of each screening and stayed right up until the very end out of interest for each film till the lights came on.I find this very polite behaviour and very unusual in our modern world of pushing and shoving.The Swiss respect other cultures and what each person has to say or offer.None of the films were Swiss made,there were Czech films,French films,Spanish films etc.
I found it all very tasteful and sweet.I think in today's world one needs a lot more of this kind of behaviour.It's about having
good manners and being brought up well,in my humble opinion.
What are your thoughts on this?I know I was in a cinema in Baden
which is a lot smaller than Zürich and friendlier as well though I
have seen this type of good beahiour in other parts of Switzerland
too on various occasions.
Well done to you Switzerland,you can be proud!
Reply With Quote
The following 11 users would like to thank Mary for this useful post:
  #2  
Old 11.09.2012, 18:19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Zurich
Posts: 6
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 6 Times in 1 Post
Katech has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I agree with you, the Swiss are not always deserving of their negative press! I was walking near Zug last weekend and standing at the top of a mountain looking down on Zurich, a biker asked if we wanted some details about what we could see - in perfect English he gave us the highlights of the view, it was a detailed run down. He was a Swiss management consultant, semi-retired, and he said it was a pleasure to share info with tourists. We didn't like to admit we'd been living here for a couple of years already.
Reply With Quote
The following 6 users would like to thank Katech for this useful post:
  #3  
Old 11.09.2012, 18:48
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Geneva
Posts: 4,019
Groaned at 37 Times in 31 Posts
Thanked 5,612 Times in 2,012 Posts
McTAVGE has a reputation beyond reputeMcTAVGE has a reputation beyond reputeMcTAVGE has a reputation beyond reputeMcTAVGE has a reputation beyond reputeMcTAVGE has a reputation beyond reputeMcTAVGE has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

LIke in every country, there are adorable, well-behaved, respectful and helpful people and others who are...well, they get the "ink running" on this forum. I would say that all our experiences in the last 3 years we've been in Switzerland have been, on the whole, very positive too, even if in Geneva it is a little more challenging to identify "Swissness"!

Quote:
View Post
I know the Swiss get a lot of negative 'press' on here but I can't help
but sharing how sweet I find them too.
At the weekend we went to the Baden animated film festival and I just loved the fact that before each film, the film being shown was introduced to the audience first,sometimes in English too by someone standing in the front of the cinema..each cinema had a beautiful vase of flowers below the screen,everyone clapped at the beginning and the end of each screening and stayed right up until the very end out of interest for each film till the lights came on.I find this very polite behaviour and very unusual in our modern world of pushing and shoving.The Swiss respect other cultures and what each person has to say or offer.None of the films were Swiss made,there were Czech films,French films,Spanish films etc.
I found it all very tasteful and sweet.I think in today's world one needs a lot more of this kind of behaviour.It's about having
good manners and being brought up well,in my humble opinion.
What are your thoughts on this?I know I was in a cinema in Baden
which is a lot smaller than Zürich and friendlier as well though I
have seen this type of good beahiour in other parts of Switzerland
too on various occasions.
Well done to you Switzerland,you can be proud!
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank McTAVGE for this useful post:
  #4  
Old 12.09.2012, 10:35
Swissy87's Avatar
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Kanton ZH
Posts: 13
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Swissy87 has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I have a very positive opinion on Swiss too.
They are very honest, respectful, and helpful - both - people I've met in loose relations, and officials.
I've noticed it's not easy to become real friends, but it's nothing bad - gaining trust and friendship needs some time. Swiss aren't very spontaneous.
While I was only visiting Switzerland as tourist, I never faced any unkind behaviour or attitude, netiher torwards me as a tourist, nor torwards me as a non-Swiss citizen.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Swissy87 for this useful post:
  #5  
Old 12.09.2012, 10:51
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Lugano
Posts: 6,504
Groaned at 129 Times in 95 Posts
Thanked 7,882 Times in 3,674 Posts
Mrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond reputeMrs. Doolittle has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

Quote:
View Post
I know I was in a cinema in Baden
which is a lot smaller than Zürich and friendlier as well
Baden is a friendly place, couldn't agree more.
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Mrs. Doolittle for this useful post:
  #6  
Old 12.09.2012, 12:05
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Anywhere but deadheadland
Posts: 365
Groaned at 9 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 261 Times in 139 Posts
jonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputation
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I think a lot of people post on EF when they encounter problems with all things Swiss. Generally speaking, people are less likely to post when things are good.

Perhaps, this has led to a degree of confirmation bias? It is certainly something I have seen on other expat forums for various countries.
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank jonbvn for this useful post:
  #7  
Old 12.09.2012, 17:07
TrainDoctor's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Reinach (BL)
Posts: 217
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanked 571 Times in 142 Posts
TrainDoctor has a reputation beyond reputeTrainDoctor has a reputation beyond reputeTrainDoctor has a reputation beyond reputeTrainDoctor has a reputation beyond reputeTrainDoctor has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I've been in Switzerland since 1989, and I'm almost acclimatised, yet despite my appalling Swiss German, in all those years I've rarely encountered the negative aspects of CH that get "bigged up" on this forum...

Anyway, I was the recipient of some amazing Swiss generosity last year. Coop was running a promotion where you collected stamps and with a filled-in page of stamps you could get a quite good Kitchen/Chef's knife, from a decent selection of types, at a pretty good discount.

One day, whilst shopping, I forgot to ask for my stamps - when I asked the cashier for my stamps a little old lady (next in line to be served) asked "do you collect the stamps, dear?" Upon the affirmative, she pressed into my hands several completed booklets of stamps (not just pages), with the words (more or less) "you use them, I won't". Thanks to this unexpected (and very generous) windfall I was able to acquire the entire range of special offer Chef's knives, knife block and other items. Needless to say, my thanks were profuse.

I've also had great interactions with some of my neighbours (whilst with others the relationship is cordial but stiff and formal).

Once you get below the the veneer of local culture and mores, the Swiss are like people everywhere...

Last edited by TrainDoctor; 12.09.2012 at 17:09. Reason: spelling, missing word
Reply With Quote
The following 3 users would like to thank TrainDoctor for this useful post:
  #8  
Old 12.09.2012, 17:21
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Zürich
Posts: 7
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
LuFiTh has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I've been in Switzerland for 5 weeks now and I'm enjoying it at the most. Sure you have 'bad' people as you have in every country.

I was really helped properly at the Gemeinde, in English in Zurich, Kreis 9. And the lady from whom I always buy my stamps is each time very friendly.

Getting back at the Baden animated film festival I think such festivals attracts those people who appreciate a good cultural movie. I personal don't like to go to cinema in Holland, Rotterdam. But, when the IFFR (International Film Festival Rotterdam) in Rotterdam starts I try to get as many movie tickets as possible. One of the rare moments the cinema is filled with movie 'lovers'.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12.09.2012, 17:31
Scrum-half's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Gone back to the UK
Posts: 39
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 19 Times in 10 Posts
Scrum-half has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I enjoy this kind of random sweetness of local people quite often.

The first time was when I just moved to Switzerland.
I went to a Migros and realised that I needed a 2 CHF coin for trolley.

Asked a lady passig by, if she could change my 2X 1 CHF with a 2 CHF coin if she had.
She produced a CHF 2 sized token for shopping trolley and said, "Keep it. It's yours now"
I still use this token.

Recently, I was at a cash machine struggling to read the screen due to the bright sunshine at that time.
A lady queueing behind me held up her handbag to make shadow on the screen. She said, "Better?"

Sweet people..
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12.09.2012, 18:18
Squeeeez's Avatar
Forum Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Frauenfeld
Posts: 1,000
Groaned at 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanked 960 Times in 441 Posts
Squeeeez has a reputation beyond reputeSqueeeez has a reputation beyond reputeSqueeeez has a reputation beyond reputeSqueeeez has a reputation beyond reputeSqueeeez has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

Quote:
View Post
Asked a lady passig by, if she could change my 2X 1 CHF with a 2 CHF coin if she had.
She produced a CHF 2 sized token for shopping trolley and said, "Keep it. It's yours now"
She was just being posh...

Quote:
Recently, I was at a cash machine struggling to read the screen due to the bright sunshine at that time.
A lady queueing behind me held up her handbag to make shadow on the screen. She said, "Better?"
And she was trying to get a better look at your PIN!

Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank Squeeeez for this useful post:
  #11  
Old 12.09.2012, 18:56
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Zürich
Posts: 30
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 27 Times in 13 Posts
Kerstin has made some interesting contributions
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I have an illness that makes me throw up a lot and I have managed to faint in public and throw up at the most inconvenient places. So far I have been brought home by two people, by car and a bus driver took it upon himself to drive the bus down my (dead-end) street. Amazing right? There are definitely sweet people around here. Even though you sometimes have to look for them.

The most incredible moment to me was, when I threw up in the middle of the Migros. I managed to grab one of my, empty, shopping bags and throw up in there. A lady from the Migros took me to the back to drink some water and get me back on my feet. When I was about to walk away a very disappointed looking Migros lady approached me explaining she tried to clean my bag (eew) but didn't manage to. She did find me a new bag though, did I terribly mind exchanging my previous one for this one? I felt really bad for her and didn't even know what to say.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 13.09.2012, 11:22
Scrum-half's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Gone back to the UK
Posts: 39
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 19 Times in 10 Posts
Scrum-half has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

Quote:
View Post
I enjoy this kind of random sweetness of local people quite often.
And, when anybody sees me trying to take or to put the parking ticket through the slot from the right hand side driver seat, they run to get it for me.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 13.09.2012, 11:31
olygirl's Avatar
Forum Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: d' Innerschwiiz
Posts: 7,619
Groaned at 416 Times in 279 Posts
Thanked 17,921 Times in 5,540 Posts
olygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond reputeolygirl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

It's their "Schoggiseite".
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank olygirl for this useful post:
  #14  
Old 13.09.2012, 11:41
sarel's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Zürich
Posts: 358
Groaned at 12 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 293 Times in 160 Posts
sarel has an excellent reputationsarel has an excellent reputationsarel has an excellent reputationsarel has an excellent reputation
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

It's funny how slow a thread about the nice side of the Swiss grows, comparing to a thread with rants about the Swiss...

I think the sweetness of the Swiss shows even more, because we are not in your face the whole time and a little standoffish.
Swiss are nice and helpful, just never sure if they are allowed to interfere. But if they do, they are mostly polite and seldom cross the personal line.
I like that respect towards other peoples space.
Reply With Quote
This user would like to thank sarel for this useful post:
  #15  
Old 13.09.2012, 11:45
Luben's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Zug
Posts: 89
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 120 Times in 46 Posts
Luben has earned the respect of manyLuben has earned the respect of manyLuben has earned the respect of many
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

We have the best Swiss neighbours where we live (4 years now), I am sure

We help each other, mind each others children while playing at the road, we greet and talk friendly together. If campaigns run in say Coop or Migros, we collect for each other, we help taking care of the others animals while they are away and we simply always try to help whenever help is needed. We have been to the local bon fire event, invited to local festivities and feel truly a part of this small community.

Still sometime I do get reminded in a very sweet way, that we ARE foreigners even up here on the hill (we are Danish). One of my sweet neighbours for instance said a while ago that we were being so nice that we could have been Swiss! I guess, we are too nice to be foreigners? ...

One of the other neighbours once said she didn't liked foreigners that much. "Oh, then how about me?" I asked. "You?" she said mildly surprissed, "Yes, I am foreign, you know". "Oh, that's something else!....Mmm then I don't like foreigners I don't know, I suppose....or people from Argau!" ....
No, it is not easy on both sides, when exceptions break throgh the thick 'general' ice of presumptions. Now she only needs to meet a nice Argau'er, then the confusion will be complete!

One day I was about to park just a second in front of the post office just to post my parcel in a hurry and no parking lots available. Jumped out of my car, hurried inside. When I got back two men were standing there explaining me thoroughly with raised voices I was parking illegal and must remove immediately. I apologised and explained I was already on my way.

When they heard I clearly wasn't Swiss THEY started apologising to me! Saying: "Oooh, please don't think we hold anything against you because you are being a foreigner. We only try to protect you from getting a ticket, since we saw a police car on the other road just now". They several time did their best to convince me they didn't want me to think their talking to me had anything to do with me being a foreigner and that they weren't against foreigners. As they so kindly said "We would have said excactly the same had you been a local"!

Couldn't be better: Treated, hugged, helped and yelled at as if we were being Swiss

We have had over all a few bad experiences in CH that could be related to the fact that we are foreigners, but this place we live in, surrounded by all the helpful, friendly locals have made it up to us 100 times to one and made us feel so extremely lucky and welcomed

I feel happy and proud if we are able to give the locals a good impression of "all us foreigners". Sometimes I tend to speak too general of "The Swiss", but it goes the other way round too. I represent somehow "all the foreigners" and that is a good thing to keep in mind.

Last edited by Luben; 13.09.2012 at 11:50. Reason: bad spelling
Reply With Quote
The following 2 users would like to thank Luben for this useful post:
  #16  
Old 13.09.2012, 11:57
whitepard's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Basel
Posts: 70
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 16 Times in 13 Posts
whitepard is considered knowledgeablewhitepard is considered knowledgeablewhitepard is considered knowledgeable
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I have quite a long standing with Switzerland and Swiss people. In Italy, my house is close to the border (not more than 10 minutes to it and 20 minutes to Chiasso), moreover my grandfather used to work for a Swiss company and my father is still working for one for 35 years now. I have a lot of swiss friends from the University, and lived first in Bern for 4 years and than here in Basel for one and a half. Bottom line I know Switzerland and Swiss people since I was born. I also lived in USA and UK and when I put all my experiences together I have to come to the following conclusion: each country has is good and bad things, pros and cons, at the end it depends what we are looking for in the place where we live and who we are. There is not a Best country, but always a better country for each one of us. For me is Switzerland and i have to admit that I like better Basel than Bern, people here are friendly and more than once I had people apologizing with me for not speaking either English or Italian! Most of the people that I met were nice and gentle, and some were not. This is quite normal. A saying of my hometown: the mother of the idiot is always pregnant.
__________________
I have searched for the phrase "I shall walk the Earth and my hunger shall know no bounds," but I keep getting redirected to Weight Watchers. (Ianto Jones, Torchwood). Blog
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05.10.2012, 00:39
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Bern 3012
Posts: 15
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Nadja2012 has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

Nice to hear such a thing, the usual thing to hear are complains.
Although
I do not find them so sweet, but rather very cool, in a sense what ever happens, they do not make a big fuss about that. its very unique!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05.10.2012, 10:11
Swissy87's Avatar
Newbie 1st class
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Kanton ZH
Posts: 13
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Swissy87 has no particular reputation at present
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I'm totally in love with Swiss people.
They are very helpful and very communicative.
When I was planning to rent an apartment, during the meeting, the Swiss owner of the apartment started talking Polish (my native language) to me, even if I had no problems communicating in English, even a little in German too. He didn't say much in my language, just "good morning" and "thank you" and some simple nouns like "window" or "door", or "floor" or "sandwich". He seemed to be very happy to surprise me. That was a very wide smile, both at his, and at my face
And as for being helpful... my fiance needed to have wireless internet connection in our flat immediately, but it wasn't possible to buy our own access yet then , so we decided to ask our neighbour to share the connection temporarly, of course we wanted to pay for that 50/50 . Our neighbour got "angry" and said that the password is "..." and that he doesn't want any money from us. As payment, we should come for dinner and have a nice conversation with our neighbours, and maybe bring some Polish product (some local cuisine) once when we are in Poland again .
I'm totally in love with Swiss people
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05.10.2012, 12:30
lmerkel's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Corseaux
Posts: 316
Groaned at 9 Times in 5 Posts
Thanked 249 Times in 114 Posts
lmerkel has an excellent reputationlmerkel has an excellent reputationlmerkel has an excellent reputationlmerkel has an excellent reputation
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

I have had very good interactions with the Swissies. People in parking lots leaving and giving me their ticket to put on my dash (so I learned to do the same for them). Lived in a small vignoble and had the vineyard folk bring over free bottles of wine and showed us their facilities and how they make the wine. Brought their kids over for Halloween treats (how American!). And especially they like if you ask them, 'Am I doing this the right way? How do you do this here? Or 'Quel est the mot en francais?' Even yesterday at the Denner, I didn't have a 10% off coupon but the cashier whipped one out to give me the discount.

But the biggest insight we got into the Suisse - I love Joe Dassin and my husband took me to a retrospective of Joe at Beaulieu. The place was packed with older and younger people, mostly if not all, Suisse. At the end, Joe's son Julian came out on stage to give a speech (I didn't even know him), and we heard hushed voices in the crowd 'It's Julian!'. He gave his speech and we saw the young, old, men and women crying! We looked at each other and said 'well this is a side of Suisse culture we have never seen.'

I love Joe and went home to google him -- he's a Brooklyn Jew. And we laughed even harder!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 05.10.2012, 12:51
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Anywhere but deadheadland
Posts: 365
Groaned at 9 Times in 7 Posts
Thanked 261 Times in 139 Posts
jonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputationjonbvn has an excellent reputation
Re: The sweetness of the Swiss

Quote:
View Post
But the biggest insight we got into the Suisse - I love Joe Dassin and my husband took me to a retrospective of Joe at Beaulieu. The place was packed with older and younger people, mostly if not all, Suisse. At the end, Joe's son Julian came out on stage to give a speech (I didn't even know him), and we heard hushed voices in the crowd 'It's Julian!'. He gave his speech and we saw the young, old, men and women crying! We looked at each other and said 'well this is a side of Suisse culture we have never seen.'
This seems very bizarre. A google search does not turn anything that would explain the reaction. He seems far more French than Swiss.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Dassin

Could you explain?
Reply With Quote
Reply




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The cost of living in the Swiss municipalities Bertrand - Geneva Finance/banking/taxation 8 25.08.2011 17:40
Swiss approve the reform of the jobless benefit scheme. travnett Swiss politics/news 73 06.07.2011 14:12
Slap a Swiss in the back of the head day? Slugnugget Jokes/funnies 25 18.02.2010 18:27
Swiss wedding: decorating the apartment of the newlyweds? Guest Daily life 12 19.10.2008 22:20


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:08.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
LinkBacks Enabled by vBSEO 3.1.0