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  #41  
Old 14.09.2016, 15:53
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping in Germany.

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A question to those who bulk buy dry food (cereals, tinned food, etc) - where do you store your haul? In your Keller? Oder?

We have a reduit where I keep some of my haul, as I am not sure the cereals will keep in our Keller. But I am rapidly running out of space!

TIA
Rice flour pasta ans cereals can all contain that little weavil/worm thing (apologies for the non technical name) so you'd be as well to keep them in airtight containers so as not to infect your whole reduit ...

Or in the freezer if you have space ..
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  #42  
Old 14.09.2016, 16:49
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping in Germany.

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Rice flour pasta ans cereals can all contain that little weavil/worm thing (apologies for the non technical name) so you'd be as well to keep them in airtight containers so as not to infect your whole reduit ...

Or in the freezer if you have space ..
Amen to that. It took me months to finally be rid of those little blighters. Just when I thought I'd got rid of them another one would pop up.
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  #43  
Old 14.09.2016, 17:55
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping in Germany.

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Get in!
I haven't heard that for years! my husband and his mates used to say it all the time...
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  #44  
Old 14.09.2016, 19:59
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

Our villiage has a small shop, and that is very convenient. I can even place an order for items they do not regularly stock but are supplied by one of their regular suppliers.

But we live 5 minutes from the German border and the closest major grocery store in Switzerland is further than the German ones, which are open until 10 pm. So I can go in the evening and not have to battle traffic.

I can also take the ferry and avoid traffic altogether.
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  #45  
Old 17.09.2016, 20:08
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

Well you probably have a good wage. So why dont you cut back in other areas so that you dont have to run around with this shopping thing looking to save a few Franks.
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Hello.
I wondered for months. How much you save by grocery shop in Germany?
As I was under impression that I'm wasting my day by shopping in Germany and wanted to stop doing it... I did the calculation my self today.
223.00 Euro spent in Kaufland.
Same / similar shopping in Coop would of been 415 Euro. (subject to food quality etc)
10-15 Euro Diesel
Minimum 4-5h needed from Zug.
Savings of around 175 Euro.

Just in case some of you wondered too, worth or not.
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  #46  
Old 17.09.2016, 21:46
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping in Germany.

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when we first arrived, we went all the time (about 45mins from waldshut) but that was when I had very young kids and I needed lots of nappies and formula. Now, not so much, I go when we need to bulk up on toiletries which I think is a bit OTT over here.

But over the years, I have realised that for the time spent and money saved I may as well stay in CH, I get all my veg in Lidl (coop is expensive by comparison) Meats i mostly still go to coop because Id rather spend on better quality than quantity. (although only perceived 'quality )
I very rarely buy any cleaning product here, that is a trip for DE.

I know I defiantly save on toiletries, cleaning products, school stuff and always christmas/birthday gifts. Fortunately thats more or less only a couple of trips per year specifically for groceries.

If you have kids, it really is a traumatic experience to go too frequently, mine hate it ( unless we bribe them with a toy/game) just the queues at the checkout at Kaufland drains the life out of you!

So to sum up, yes you can save going to Germany /france/Italy it all depends on the 'willingness' of the family, if your all happy going and twin it with a 'day out' then great but to go regularly every week, fight the masses and spend another hour unpacking all the stuff (as well as all the 'extras' just because its cheap) its just not for me - although took me about 2 years to realise that!
Agree. We live 10 mins from German supermarkets but grocery shopping there with 2 young kids is just too stressful and I hate the queues there. We peacefully do our everyday shopping at Migros as part of our morning walks, and have the Saturdays completely free to do fun things.

I do buy toiletries abroad and Buy other things online to have it delivered to a German shipping address. Go there once in a while to pick it all up.
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  #47  
Old 17.09.2016, 22:01
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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Well you probably have a good wage. So why dont you cut back in other areas so that you dont have to run around with this shopping thing looking to save a few Franks.
You had nothing to do on a Saturday night and you wrote me something I already know?
And NO. I don't have a good wage, and yet you don't me hearing complaining that the rubish bags are very expensive in Switzerland.
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  #48  
Old 17.09.2016, 22:28
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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You had nothing to do on a Saturday night and you wrote me something I already know?
And NO. I don't have a good wage, and yet you don't me hearing complaining that the rubish bags are very expensive in Switzerland.
Sometimes it's hard to comprehend that people can have differing priorities
For giggles, there is a huge rubbish/recycling rant-nag thread on EF - Rubbish/recycling Compliance (thread split)

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Amen to that. It took me months to finally be rid of those little blighters. Just when I thought I'd got rid of them another one would pop up.
Popping flour (and possibly other stuff) in the freezer for 48 hours after buying has prevented the little sh*s showing up in my cabinet. Of course, if you see the package contents moving in the store, don't buy it

Last edited by glowjupiter; 17.09.2016 at 22:55.
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  #49  
Old 17.09.2016, 23:06
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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Your saving calculation is a bit of. You only look at the diesel used and miss the other car running costs. From Zug to Waldshut and back are 140km which is an other 50 in running cost.
Additionally, in the 4-5 hours you need for shopping your husband could work as a cleaning lady and make an other 20 to 25 per hour.
Finally your kids, they could either knot carpets with their tiny hands (makes around 5 per hour) or practice tennis and aim for the Wimbeldon price money.

"and miss the other car running costs." You should not take these into account. They are what accountants call "sunk costs"; the money is gone and there is no way to get it back.
You should only look at opportunity costs (usually petrol or diesel); that is the money you need to lay out to make a new journey.

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Our villiage has a small shop, and that is very convenient. I can even place an order for items they do not regularly stock but are supplied by one of their regular suppliers.

But we live 5 minutes from the German border and the closest major grocery store in Switzerland is further than the German ones, which are open until 10 pm. So I can go in the evening and not have to battle traffic.

I can also take the ferry and avoid traffic altogether.
"We live 5 minutes from the German border and the closest major grocery store in Switzerland is further than the German ones" Me too; we go shopping abroad (Aldi or Lidl) one or two times a month and spend around euro 150 with 18 or 19 tax back.
Best savings are on fresh salmon and chicken, frozen prawns, Cheese, wines from other countries, fruit and vegetables; both fresh and tinned (the overall cost of fruit and vegetables is not high in Switzerland so although the %ge saving is high the actual money saving is not much), we eat very little meat anyway.
Never did find a salami we like.

Toiletries we usually go to DM once a month.
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  #50  
Old 17.09.2016, 23:09
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

So tell me. How much do you earn?
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You had nothing to do on a Saturday night and you wrote me something I already know?
And NO. I don't have a good wage, and yet you don't me hearing complaining that the rubish bags are very expensive in Switzerland.
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  #51  
Old 17.09.2016, 23:34
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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So tell me. How much do you earn?
How much is a person "allowed" to earn to be justified in shopping across the border?
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Old 17.09.2016, 23:52
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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"and miss the other car running costs." You should not take these into account. They are what accountants call "sunk costs"; the money is gone and there is no way to get it back.
You should only look at opportunity costs (usually petrol or diesel); that is the money you need to lay out to make a new journey.



"We live 5 minutes from the German border and the closest major grocery store in Switzerland is further than the German ones" Me too; we go shopping abroad (Aldi or Lidl) one or two times a month and spend around euro 150 with 18 or 19 tax back.
Best savings are on fresh salmon and chicken, frozen prawns, Cheese, wines from other countries, fruit and vegetables; both fresh and tinned (the overall cost of fruit and vegetables is not high in Switzerland so although the %ge saving is high the actual money saving is not much), we eat very little meat anyway.

Never did find a salami we like.

Toiletries we usually go to DM once a month.
I never realised VAT was so high on food in Germany, i always thought it was at a reduced rate of 7%, amazing what you learn here

http://www.vatlive.com/vat-rates/eur.../eu-vat-rates/
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Old 18.09.2016, 00:39
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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How much is a person "allowed" to earn to be justified in shopping across the border?
Anything since the its the Swiss retailers who need to justify their over inflated prices. Anyone shopping in Migros or COOP clearly is paid too much and shoul be required to help subsidize the rest of us
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Old 18.09.2016, 00:44
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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Anyone shopping in Migros or COOP clearly is paid too much and shoul be required to help subsidize the rest of us
If people decide to spend their money in Migros and Coop (or wherever) that is their decision and no one's business but their own. If you want to spend it somewhere cheaper than Migros/Coop, go ahead, but requiring those who shop in Migros/Coop "to help subsidize" just because they shop there is bull, sorry.
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Old 18.09.2016, 01:13
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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If people decide to spend their money in Migros and Coop (or wherever) that is their decision and no one's business but their own. If you want to spend it somewhere cheaper than Migros/Coop, go ahead, but requiring those who shop in Migros/Coop "to help subsidize" just because they shop there is bull, sorry.
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  #56  
Old 18.09.2016, 08:50
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

Well I can understand why people living on the border shop in Germany. That makes sense.But some German products just are not the quality of Swiss-dairy products and meat for example.

And as I said,one can save in other ways instead of spending your hard earned free time in shopping in Germany.


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How much is a person "allowed" to earn to be justified in shopping across the border?
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Old 18.09.2016, 09:31
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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We go shopping abroad (Aldi or Lidl) one or two times a month and spend around euro 150 with 18 or 19 tax back.
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I never realised VAT was so high on food in Germany, i always thought it was at a reduced rate of 7%, amazing what you learn here

http://www.vatlive.com/vat-rates/eur.../eu-vat-rates/
It is the product mix that counts; ours includes a high proportion of wine. Quote "Best savings are on ....... wines from other countries ......"
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Old 18.09.2016, 09:54
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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Well I can understand why people living on the border shop in Germany. That makes sense.But some German products just are not the quality of Swiss-dairy products and meat for example.

And as I said,one can save in other ways instead of spending your hard earned free time in shopping in Germany.
The parking lots at the grocery stores in Germany are filled with cars with Swiss plates both during the day and in the evenings, with some shops open until 10 pm.

As for your comment about product quality, the selection of German dairy products is extensive, particularly for those who are lactose intolerant. I have never found the quality to be inferior to Swiss products. But the prices are considerably lower in Germany.
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Old 18.09.2016, 10:02
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

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As for your comment about product quality, the selection of German dairy products is extensive, particularly for those who are lactose intolerant. I have never found the quality to be inferior to Swiss products. But the prices are considerably lower in Germany.
I'd pay twice as much for Swiss milk as we do presently.

Swiss dairy farmers, like U.K. dairy farmers cannot survive with the prices that supermarkets pay them for the milk.

It's not all about quality (there are EU standards for that) but taste too.

I guess if people can't taste the difference then it doesn't matter where they shop and what they buy - they may as well buy the cheapest.
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Old 18.09.2016, 10:12
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Re: Savings - grocery shopping over the border.

Have a Dutch lorry driver in my extended family. Once a month he makes a run to Switzerland to pick up milk and then delivers it to Tesco in Hampshire.
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