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  #121  
Old 26.06.2017, 16:53
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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:Yup. I can concur, having lived there for a time in my early 20s.
I'm guessing that you lived among the Welsh, and not the Welsch.
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  #122  
Old 26.06.2017, 17:21
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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I'm guessing that you lived among the Welsh, and not the Welsch.
Yep.

Confused. With the c it's an old name for the Welsh language.
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  #123  
Old 26.06.2017, 18:52
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Yep.

Confused. With the c it's an old name for the Welsh language.
Welschschweiz.
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  #124  
Old 27.06.2017, 01:08
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

Diolch yn fawr.
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  #125  
Old 27.06.2017, 10:35
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

Efallai y llygad y dydd sprout yn eich cwpanau te.
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  #126  
Old 27.06.2017, 10:37
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Efallai y llygad y dydd sprout yn eich cwpanau te.


Google translate:


Daisy may sprout in your teacups


:-)


What is the real translation?
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  #127  
Old 27.06.2017, 10:52
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Google translate:


Daisy may sprout in your teacups


:-)


What is the real translation?
May daisies sprout in your tea cups.

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  #128  
Old 27.06.2017, 11:02
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Google translate:


Daisy may sprout in your teacups


:-)


What is the real translation?
In Glasgow or Liverpool it would probably not invoke botanical or dietary imagery.
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  #129  
Old 27.06.2017, 11:32
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Thongs -> flip-flops

Sweat -> a sweatshirt

Training -> sweatpants

Kickers -> rainboots

Sympathetic -> as pleasant, easy going

Yeah, it was fun to be asked if the beamer in my class was working. I also get a kick out of "sandwichs" on a menu, it is really cute. "Natel" gets tricky now, I am wearing a brace so people tell me "tu as une attelle" and somehow I keep imagining my cell every time.
Sweat pronounced as 'sweet' ...

to be fair, the French and Swiss French often do not understand each other- just as the US and UK ... or Geordies and Scousers (inhabitants of Newcastle of Liverpool)

J'étais sur mon boguet avec mon Natel - will be gobbledigook to a French person (I was on my moped with my mobile phone) ... etc.
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  #130  
Old 27.06.2017, 11:42
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Sweat pronounced as 'sweet' ...
Speaking of "sweet" I remember some confusion when I first came here when people were talking about "sweet" water when referring to the lakes. I know the lakes of Switzerland are beautiful and picturesque but surely the water hasn't been flavoured accordingly?? Surely not!

No, it's just a direct translation to "sweetwater" instead of "freshwater"...

Last edited by Sandgrounder; 27.06.2017 at 11:56. Reason: for clarity...
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  #131  
Old 27.06.2017, 11:47
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Speaking of "sweet" I remember some confusion when I first came here when people were talking about "sweet" water when referring to the lakes. I know the lakes of Switzerland are beautiful and picturesque but surely the water hasn't been flavoured accordingly?? Surely not!

No, it's just a direct translation of "freshwater"...
Actually, it's a direct translation of Süßwasser , or Süsswasser, as it would be written in Swiss German.

Last edited by JagWaugh; 27.06.2017 at 12:51. Reason: Corrected spellink to reflect SG usage
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  #132  
Old 27.06.2017, 11:55
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Actually, it's a direct translation of Süßwasser
Yep, sorry, I know. Just badly worded it up there - fixed for clarity...
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  #133  
Old 27.06.2017, 12:00
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Yep, sorry, I know. Just badly worded it up there - fixed for clarity...
Years ago when our son was quite small we visited my parents in Toronto. My dad went out in the car with my son and they had a discussion about genealogy and our family history (which was a subject of great interest to my son at that time).

I knew this to be the case when my father asked me what a "Big Clock father" was... translate "Uhrgrossvater" literally when you're 3, and that's about what you'll come up with.
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  #134  
Old 27.06.2017, 12:45
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Actually, it's a direct translation of Süßwasser
This outs you as Austrian or German (or Canadian or a copycat ).
Swiss don't use the Eszett, it doesn't exist in our alphabet.
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  #135  
Old 28.06.2017, 00:38
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

Romantic Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Normans/French: they all happily mixed their languages - that's how English evolved and got the richest vocabulary of all indo-european languages. The etymologists traced all the little words nicely back to their origins but languages keep evolving (that's by the way how the smoking made its appearance - nothing wrong there just a natural process).
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  #136  
Old 28.06.2017, 11:25
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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I think you need to specify that you mean Swiss German people.


"Handy" is commonly used in all German speaking countries to mean a mobile (cell phone for you others "over there") In the French speaking part we use the word "natel" for a mobile, which was in fact the name of the first mobil phone company here...or so I'm told. Natel...a bit like saying Hoover for a vacuum cleaner.
Natel is actually orginally short for "Nationales Telefon" (as it had no area code) and was the first model produced by what is today Swisscom (and Swisscom have trademarked it). In French, it should technically be "telnat", not "natel"
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  #137  
Old 28.06.2017, 13:36
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Natel is actually orginally short for "Nationales Telefon" (as it had no area code) and was the first model produced by what is today Swisscom (and Swisscom have trademarked it). In French, it should technically be "telnat", not "natel"
Back in February Swisscom announced that they will discontinue use of the name Natel (in favour of "inOne mobile")

20 minutes article (in German)

However, just as English is unlikely to stop using the term "hoover" if Hoover stop making vacuum cleaners, no doubt Natel will live on.
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  #138  
Old 30.06.2017, 04:25
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Back in February Swisscom announced that they will discontinue use of the name Natel (in favour of "inOne mobile")
I wonder if they will let go of the trademark. Also I wish companies would stop to use English to market their products and even name themselves. From the French version of the Sunrise website: Flat, Top Deals, All-in-One, Spotlight, My Sunrise, Freedom, surf & talk, Sunrise Smartphone Upgrade, Investor Relations.
Sunrise customers must all be very fluent in English...
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  #139  
Old 30.06.2017, 09:08
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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I wonder if they will let go of the trademark. Also I wish companies would stop to use English to market their products and even name themselves. From the French version of the Sunrise website: Flat, Top Deals, All-in-One, Spotlight, My Sunrise, Freedom, surf & talk, Sunrise Smartphone Upgrade, Investor Relations.
Sunrise customers must all be very fluent in English...
Everytime companies or even countries have tried to let go of the "English" the results have been hilarious, look at France trying to replace Anglicisms with Francocisms. (look I invented a new word)
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  #140  
Old 30.06.2017, 09:21
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Re: Understanding the Swiss... when they speak English...

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Everytime companies or even countries have tried to let go of the "English" the results have been hilarious, look at France trying to replace Anglicisms with Francocisms. (look I invented a new word)
It was hilarious living in France at the time when Jacques Toubon was the minister for culture and francophonie. His attempts to limit Anglicisms in everyday language and the % of English speaking songs on the radio led to some very amusing expressions.
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