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  #21  
Old 22.08.2017, 12:22
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

i would go for one of those: https://www.aliexpress.com/popular/g...r-tracker.html
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  #22  
Old 22.08.2017, 12:45
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

I'm worried about having a frequently-on 2W cellular transmitter strapped to a child body.
I'd wish Sigfox had any coverage in Switzerland:
Sigfox
There are multiple companies selling small tags with batteries lasting months that use Sigfox network.
I see that Swisscom has a similar network now but I don't know if there are any affordable trackers vendors yet:
Swisscom low-power network coverage
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  #23  
Old 22.08.2017, 13:02
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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I'd buy a cheap android phone and download friend finder.
My thoughts exactly. These GPS trackers are essentially just el cheapo crippled phones with who knows what spyware on them. Why not just buy the real thing for a few bucks off Ricardo or something, and stuff it with spyware yourself? Or you could go for something nicer new and make it a center of kids digital life too
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  #24  
Old 22.08.2017, 13:06
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

My eldest daughter starting walking alone to Kindergarten when she was 4. Where I live in canton Zurich it is a requirement. Parents are certainly not allowed to drive their kids. A Police officer even comes in to teach the kids how to use crossings near the beginning of Kindergarten.

She is also 6 now and started school yesterday. Today she already wanted to walk alone (school is in a different part of the village). She is absolutely capable and even though it went against my initial instincts when she was 4, I'm glad that I wasn't given the chance to wrap her in cotton-wool as she has so much confidence now.

My youngest daughter, 4, started Kindergarten today. I'm looking forward to the point when she will start walking alone, but it will probably take a few months. It's not an easy process and what I had to do with my eldest daughter was shorten the amount I walked with her over a period of weeks. When we reached about half-way it just clicked and she was fine. There were a few tears but it was worth it.

I wouldn't bother with a GPS tracker, unless the area you live in somehow warrants it.
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  #25  
Old 22.08.2017, 13:29
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

I can see the fears plaguing parents. I can even imagine that expats parents have bigger worries than Swiss ones (not because the Swiss don't care).
The reason schools here expect the kids to walk to school is not lack of sense of responsibility or money either - I was quite amazed, what short distances already are covered by school buses nowadays.

But it is a very thin line one is walking, using GPS trackers. One, you teach the kid subconsciously that walking to school is so dangerous that there is no way for it to learn it truly. After a few little incidents (where you ran after it because it went off track a few hundred meters) the kid will have the conviction that it will always be found, no matter how thoughtlessly it wanders "the world" (and ain't it fun to just follow the butterflies etc when one knows that deep down).

Next the parents get very used to it. When will they be able to stop tracking their kids? Those 12 year old rascals, what are they really up to?.... And there is so much you think you need to know about the where abouts when they're teen-agers ..... then those 18 year old girls are not really safe either actually, are they .....

When will you "set them free"? Will you let them decide when they no longer need / want to be tracked "for their own safety"?

I like the way OP trains his young ones now by prolonging the path they walk alone more and more. This I think is the way to go.

I could imagine, those trackers are also a lot of fun for Daddy . If he made it fun for the kid too (not hiding it somewhere without the kid knowing) and make it a game (kid pressing the button: "Daddy, guess where I am now?" "Passing Migros?" "Riiight" could cause a whole different situation.
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  #26  
Old 22.08.2017, 13:32
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

A Swisscom LoRa network based tracker:
https://www.findme-tracker.ch

They say its battery charge suffices for a couple of months.
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  #27  
Old 22.08.2017, 13:52
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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And how will the tracker prevents him from getting hit by a car or being bothered by an older kid?

With my own, we go through basic safety issues and try to imagine solutions together. As in, I took a wrong turn, I missed my bus stop, what do I do if I get lost, etc. Much more efficient in the long run than tracking my child as if he was a migrating whale in the ocean
Hi, can you give a few tips on what solutions you taught you kid for these scenarios?

- wrong turn

- what do I do if I get lost

without having a phone?
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  #28  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:10
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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Hi, can you give a few tips on what solutions you taught you kid for these scenarios?

- wrong turn

- what do I do if I get lost

without having a phone?
Used to be ask someone. Preferably someone in a uniform or with a child already. It's what I did when I was lost in the woods aged 8ish, I went to a mum with kids and said I was lost and she took me to a policeman (there was a carnival in the park next to the woods).
It's also what I have done seeing kids distressed with no obvious parent around, gone up and asked if they are OK and need help. Here you can still do that.
Once a saw a toddler about to fall up a downward escalator in the UK and scooped it up put it down and checked it was OK before pointing out the mother (pushchair covered in shopping bags looking stressed, I had clocked her before when I saw said toddler running alone in the mall). The mother's look of fear that a stranger had touched her child was very sad to me.
Kids need to know stranger danger, that is true, but everyone in society should also react to a child (or and adult for that matter) in distress and stop and help.
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  #29  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:13
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

Looking back - a tracking device will probably not sooth parental frenzy, as little as a leash will not teach a toddler to not want to bolt. I'd suggest if a parent thinks a kid is not ready to walk by himself (I am not saying if a parent is not ready for this), to transition in little steps and accompany. I live in a really thick traffic area and school stopped giving hell to parents about walking their kids to school, instead they invited cops for more presence.

Good luck with the tracking gadget, and if it needs to last - better tell a kid to not throw the bag around much, they seem to enjoy throwing it around quite a bit.
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  #30  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:23
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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My eldest daughter starting walking alone to Kindergarten when she was 4. Where I live in canton Zurich it is a requirement. Parents are certainly not allowed to drive their kids. A Police officer even comes in to teach the kids how to use crossings near the beginning of Kindergarten.
.
While one of my children was having this training last year, my wife was waiting at the bus stop near the pedestrian crossing.

Neither she, nor the policeman doing the training, who was waiting, with the children to cross the road could believe the number of cars that blatantly drove across the crossing in this time.

My wife also noted the Policeman managed to take down all the car registrations!

When children get taught not to actually cross the crossing until the cars have actually stopped, it's for a good reason!
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  #31  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:26
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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I'd buy a cheap android phone and download friend finder.
The point is I don't think a 6 yo should have a mobile phone on them, even if its a Nokia 3210 type dumb phone. These GPS trackers are crippled for good reason, they're not something a kid will care about, show off to their friends or lose and by not having a screen or powerful CPU they can last a week on a single charge.
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  #32  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:37
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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The point is I don't think a 6 yo should have a mobile phone on them.
You monster!

Depriving a child of mobile phone should be considered child abuse and a crime in today's digital age
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  #33  
Old 22.08.2017, 14:42
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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While one of my children was having this training last year, my wife was waiting at the bus stop near the pedestrian crossing.

Neither she, nor the policeman doing the training, who was waiting, with the children to cross the road could believe the number of cars that blatantly drove across the crossing in this time.

My wife also noted the Policeman managed to take down all the car registrations!

When children get taught not to actually cross the crossing until the cars have actually stopped, it's for a good reason!
Yes, now I often see signs in villages explaining to drivers that kids are taught not to cross until they see the wheels have stopped moving. I think a lot of drivers find it annoying that the kid doesn't move while they slowly drift towards the crossing, but it's absolutely necessary and hopefully people will start reading the signs.

Where I live though (small village) I don't think I've ever seen someone ignoring a crossing. But inside Zurich, plenty of times
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Old 22.08.2017, 14:43
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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A Swisscom LoRa network based tracker:
https://www.findme-tracker.ch

They say its battery charge suffices for a couple of months.
I bought a couple of LORA modules a couple of weeks ago. Now I just need to find the time to assemble them!
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  #35  
Old 22.08.2017, 15:01
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

Out of interest, how are children normally taught to cross the road here?

However they're doing it, it's not working very well.... the number of occasions I've been driving on non main roads where I've seen a kid and thought, yeah, I bet you're going to [do something stupid without looking], and they do is so very high.

Unsure what the RTA stats are here, but I spoke with a Swiss lass at work about this once about how bad they are with road safety here. The response was along the lines of referencing the fact that the person has right of way now. Almost whatever the situation.

Struck me (no pun intended) as archetypal Swiss thinking. Yeah you can run me down, but I'm in the right!

Now I think about it, this must be what they're teaching them...

It's really staggering though.

Last edited by BrianClose; 22.08.2017 at 15:02. Reason: missed word
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  #36  
Old 22.08.2017, 15:11
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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Out of interest, how are children normally taught to cross the road here?

However they're doing it, it's not working very well.... the number of occasions I've been driving on non main roads where I've seen a kid and thought, yeah, I bet you're going to [do something stupid without looking], and they do is so very high.

Unsure what the RTA stats are here, but I spoke with a Swiss lass at work about this once about how bad they are with road safety here. The response was along the lines of referencing the fact that the person has right of way now. Almost whatever the situation.

Struck me (no pun intended) as archetypal Swiss thinking. Yeah you can run me down, but I'm in the right!

Now I think about it, this must be what they're teaching them...

It's really staggering though.
As another poster mentioned its also the fault of drivers, many of whom don't slow down when they see a child in the vicinity of a crossing. They only slow when the kid is about to cross, which in the case of my son is never unless he's sure the car is stopping (chicken and egg).
What I have noticed him doing (from observing him from afar) is wait until a bigger kid or adult crosses, and then scoot along behind them.
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Old 22.08.2017, 15:31
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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However they're doing it, it's not working very well.... the number of occasions I've been driving on non main roads where I've seen a kid and thought, yeah, I bet you're going to [do something stupid without looking], and they do is so very high.
This is how your meant to approach every crossing as the driver. If anyone is near it you are meant to be slowing down in anticipation of them crossing the road.

I was just back in the UK last week, and I realised how unsafe it is there. There are crossings, but the car has the right of way in most situations (unless there are lights or its a pelican), so it was very often an unclear situation. I find the solution here much better as it's clear for everyone. You see a crossing and as a driver you better be ready to stop.

Apart from crossing on round-about exits, that's just silly
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Old 22.08.2017, 15:41
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

I'm well aware of how I'm supposed to drive.

I don't mention that of crossings, that's much more obvious, I'm talking about wandering out into the road without looking.

Similar behaviour, but from a driving perspective is those junctions you pull out of where you have right of way (no stop chevrons). I see cyclists flying out around these without looking - you have to know it's that kind of junction to look out for this, or you see it when you get parallel to the junction and are wearing a cyclist (and yes, you're driving slowly and to the limits).

I genuinely think it's really unsafe, and I will teach my son differently, but I want him to think before he steps out. My observation is that often, too often, they don't. Don't give someone a chance to run you over, I don't want it left in the hands of a third party.

Is it so mad to think like this?

Last edited by BrianClose; 22.08.2017 at 15:48. Reason: typo
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Old 22.08.2017, 16:02
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

My grandfather, who died when I was six, took me for walks every day, when I was small, before kindergarten age. And he taught me to look out for the church towers in our area, then go there and then go home from there. It was just a game...

Now I am about as old as my grandfather, when he died and I still use this type of simple navigational skill occasionally, even though I do have a phone.

Teach a toddler how to fish
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  #40  
Old 22.08.2017, 16:10
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Re: Kids GPS trackers

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Out of interest, how are children normally taught to cross the road here?
"luege, lose, laufe" (look, hear, walk) is how they are taught as little children - by the police as many mentioned.

However they're doing it, it's not working very well.... the number of occasions I've been driving on non main roads where I've seen a kid and thought, yeah, I bet you're going to [do something stupid without looking], and they do is so very high.
That is because - while you can teach them and have to do so by repeating and repeating - they stay children. Children don't have the ability yet to think ahead and imagine consequences and are easily destracted by anything that in their opinion has priority.

Unsure what the RTA stats are here, but I spoke with a Swiss lass at work about this once about how bad they are with road safety here. The response was along the lines of referencing the fact that the person has right of way now. Almost whatever the situation.
Not really true. But if you run them over they will at least get you for "Nichtbeherrschen des Fahrzeuges" (not mastering the vehicle).

Struck me (no pun intended) as archetypal Swiss thinking. Yeah you can run me down, but I'm in the right!
LOL, yes, you got a point there.

Now I think about it, this must be what they're teaching them...
nope

It's really staggering though.
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I'm well aware of how I'm supposed to drive.

I don't mention that of crossings, that's much more obvious, I'm talking about wandering out into the road without looking.
A horrible habit that grew with the amount of handies owned. But they are not in the right. Still, you can't just run them over to teach them that lesson

Similar behaviour, but from a driving perspective is those junctions you pull out of where you have right of way (no stop chevrons). I see cyclists flying out around these without looking - you have to know it's that kind of junction to look out for this, you have to look out for anything "flying" out from the right Anybody who wants to "sell his old car" (to your insurance ) will do exactly this. or you see it when you get parallel to the junction and are wearing a cyclist (and yes, you're driving slowly and to the limits).

I genuinely think it's really unsafe, and I will teach my son differently, but I want him to think before he steps out. My observation is that often, too often, they don't. Don't give someone a chance to run you over, I don't want it left in the hands of a third party.

Is it so mad to think like this?
You are actually claiming, the police teaches the kids (or anybody for that matter) to just step into the street without looking?
The law is that the weaker in the traffic has to be considered - or the stronger in the trafic has to have regards for the weaker. A pedestrian is not allowed to just walk into the street, he will be punished for doing so ... only trouble is you will have run him over = your punishment will be worse.

But you really do have a point that people more and more seem to act according to the "you can run me down but I'm in the right" attitude. A truly strange notion.
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