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  #21  
Old 11.09.2019, 18:03
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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I don't understand flour here at all and keep having bad results at cake making
Put a shot of rhum in it, it will rise (provided you put also the raising powder in it, too). Trust me.
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  #22  
Old 11.09.2019, 19:00
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

I wish it could just be plain or self raising like in Britain, I am flummoxed by what the numbers on the packets mean

I have a fantastic recipe for a fruited tea loaf made with strong black tea and no eggs by a lady called Marguerite Patten (she worked for the Ministry of Food during WW2 working out all sorts of recipes to eke out rations, also recipes with no eggs in them). Comes out to perfection when i make it back in Scotland, in Basel it gets fed to the local ducks
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Old 11.09.2019, 19:18
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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I wish it could just be plain or self raising like in Britain, I am flummoxed by what the numbers on the packets mean

I have a fantastic recipe for a fruited tea loaf made with strong black tea and no eggs by a lady called Marguerite Patten (she worked for the Ministry of Food during WW2 working out all sorts of recipes to eke out rations, also recipes with no eggs in them). Comes out to perfection when i make it back in Scotland, in Basel it gets fed to the local ducks
Ooh, would you mind sharing the recipe.

I use the normal white flour and baking powder (using the quantities advised by Nigella Lawson) to make self raising flour and my cakes turn out really well.
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Old 11.09.2019, 19:56
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

MARGUERITE PATTEN'S EGGLESS TEALOAF

Preheat oven to 180c. Line an 18cm round cake tin or loaf tin with baking parchment.

INGREDIENTS
300g self raising flour (or plain and 2 tsp baking powder)
85g light brown, caster or granulated sugar
1 level tsp bicarbonate of soda
85g butter
85g dried fruit
Vanilla essence or cinnamon (optional)
300ml moderately strong black tea (English Breakfast is good)

METHOD
1 Pour the tea into a large saucepan, add the butter, sugar and dried fruit
2 Bring to the boil, then simmer until the butter and sugar have melted
3 Boil briskly for 2 mins then remove from the heat and allow to cool
4 Sift the flour and bicarbonate into a large bowl
5 Add the cooled ingredients and mix well
6 Spoon into the prepared tin and bake for 1hr - 1hr 15 mins until cake is firm and brown
7 Allow to cool for 5 - 10 mins before removing from the tin. Slice when cold

When this recipe turns out right it is delicious spread with butter.

I've been making this since about 1982, over the years I've made it for other people and never had a problem until I tried making it over here
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  #25  
Old 12.09.2019, 04:21
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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I don't understand flour here at all and keep having bad results at cake making



have a look

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mehl


https://www.coopathome.ch/de/baecker...und-mehlsorten
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  #26  
Old 12.09.2019, 19:27
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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I don't understand flour here at all and keep having bad results at cake making
Might not be the flour. I just found out (after living here for 2 years) that baking powder here is single-acting instead of the typical double-acting.

Sigh. So many rage attacks and cakes tossed into bins over the past 2 years. Noticeable improvement in all baked goods since I found out I just needed to double the amount of baking powder.
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Old 04.12.2019, 03:02
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

If anyone misses Twistees, Migros Fonzies do the job.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisties
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  #28  
Old 04.12.2019, 11:41
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

You can often find self raising flour in an Asian store.

The Asiaway in Winterthur had both self-raising and cake flour. I’ve never used self raising, but the cake flour did a great job on several things.
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  #29  
Old 04.12.2019, 13:04
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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You can often find self raising flour in an Asian store.

The Asiaway in Winterthur had both self-raising and cake flour. I’ve never used self raising, but the cake flour did a great job on several things.
That's a new one on me. What exactly goes into cake flour that's not in ordinary (at least by UK standards) self-raising flour? For that matter, is the US all-purpose flour the same thing?

I much prefer to know what's going into my baking, so US or UK recipes using pre-mixed flours do annoy me. It means I need to start looking up ingredients and equivalents every time.

Then again, I do like it that bread flour (in the UK) is labelled as Bread or Strong flour, whereas in CH and France you need to start looking up the different naming conventions they use.

My thought process often goes like "Type 55, is it, or type 45, for bread. What about this stuff labelled 00, is that the same? " and TBH the Swiss ones don't really even get a look in, given the price difference, so I can't recall how they're labelled.
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  #30  
Old 04.12.2019, 13:28
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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If anyone misses Twistees, Migros Fonzies do the job.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisties
wow even the packaging looks the same lol
but i'm guessing no curry flavour? (my fave twistie)

https://produkte.migros.ch/fonzies
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  #31  
Old 04.12.2019, 13:42
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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My thought process often goes like "Type 55, is it, or type 45, for bread. What about this stuff labelled 00, is that the same?
Maybe these will help:
https://www.virtuousbread.com/bread-...lian-00-flour/
https://www.englishforum.ch/food-dri...ing-flour.html

---

Interesting stuff about Twisties... For some reason Fonzies are very famous in Italy ("if you don't lick your fingers, you enjoy only half of it"). I wonder if they are named after Arthur Fonzarelli or what else...?
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  #32  
Old 04.12.2019, 13:45
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

A lobotomy. You're all reading it now.
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  #33  
Old 04.12.2019, 13:54
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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That's a new one on me. What exactly goes into cake flour that's not in ordinary (at least by UK standards) self-raising flour? For that matter, is the US all-purpose flour the same thing?

I much prefer to know what's going into my baking, so US or UK recipes using pre-mixed flours do annoy me. It means I need to start looking up ingredients and equivalents every time.
For UK SR flour just don't then add baking powder. Simples.
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Old 04.12.2019, 14:03
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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For UK SR flour just don't then add baking powder. Simples.
Well no, that's the wrong way around. If I've got a UK or US recipe then I need to add raising agents to non-SR flour, and it's working out what exactly to use, and how much, that creates the issue.

This has all been discussed in detail here before, and yes, I know where I can find the information I need, but it's still something I need to do every time, given the infrequency of my baking, and that's what's slightly annoying.
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Old 04.12.2019, 14:05
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

A lobotomy. You're all reading it now.
No-one's forcing you to read it.
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  #36  
Old 04.12.2019, 14:06
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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Well no, that's the wrong way around.
Re-read I think.

There's no need to add anything to UK Self Raising flour - the clue is in the name, innit?

Thanks for making my point above though
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  #37  
Old 04.12.2019, 14:15
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

French SR flour isn't rising too much, I always add a bit of raising powder. (Known as prdopeč where I am from). For regular Swiss flour I double the raising powder, at least. It works.

What I haven't found a substitute is Czech rhum (tuzemskı rum). Our rhum. It has completely diff taste than rhum I can get here and it always goes into desserts. If I throw a 1/2 shot of rhum into the recipes, everthing rises, no need to double the raising powder nor add raising powder into SR.
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Old 04.12.2019, 14:19
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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Well no, that's the wrong way around. If I've got a UK or US recipe then I need to add raising agents to non-SR flour, and it's working out what exactly to use, and how much, that creates the issue.
No it isn't. You have misread. That is not what I said. No working out needed if you use SR flour.

It's a straight ratio between plain flour and baking powder anyway, isn't it? I used to premix a whole pack of flour with the necessary amount of baking powder and keep it in an air tight container.

Then use it as is. Had no problems.
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  #39  
Old 04.12.2019, 14:23
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

I've got a table in the front of a notebook.

100g flour: 1 tsp baking powder*
200g flour:
500g flour:


* that's not right - I'd need to look it up in the book.
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Old 04.12.2019, 14:25
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Re: Today I found a Swiss substitute for...

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That's a new one on me. What exactly goes into cake flour that's not in ordinary (at least by UK standards) self-raising flour? For that matter, is the US all-purpose flour the same thing?

I much prefer to know what's going into my baking, so US or UK recipes using pre-mixed flours do annoy me. It means I need to start looking up ingredients and equivalents every time.

Then again, I do like it that bread flour (in the UK) is labelled as Bread or Strong flour, whereas in CH and France you need to start looking up the different naming conventions they use.

My thought process often goes like "Type 55, is it, or type 45, for bread. What about this stuff labelled 00, is that the same? " and TBH the Swiss ones don't really even get a look in, given the price difference, so I can't recall how they're labelled.
"Cake and Pastry" flour is made of soft wheat (less gluten) so that baked goods are light. Bread flour/strong flour has a higher gluten content for the more elastic dough required for yeast breads. All-purpose flour is something in between.
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