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Old 14.01.2020, 13:26
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Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

I learned to drive before I was ten years old on a tractor. When I was six I remember sitting on my uncle’s lap steering his massive Ford Pick up truck down country roads. By the time I was twelve a clutch was a piece of cake and there wasn’t much on wheels that I didn’t feel like I could handle. Needless to say, when I turned 16 getting my license came easily and then I cut my teeth on the commuter crowded highways around Washington DC and Baltimore, Maryland. Like Los Angeles, Atlanta and other large metro areas, If you can drive there, you can drive anywhere….except maybe in Switzerland.

I moved to Switzerland 8 months ago with my Swiss wife and our toddler son. I had visited Switzerland multiple times over the last 5 years, but I was always a passenger, never a driver. And I was usually saying things like, “Look! Mountains! Look! A cow!”. Upon official arrival, I dutifully converted to a Swiss license and thought I was ready to go.

Not Quite.

Driving is Switzerland is not a pastime. It is not a leisure activity. It is a full on battle of wits and concentration not unlike a Master game of Chess. The rules, written and unwritten, are intricate and detailed. The struggle is real! For example…

When approaching an intersection with stoplights, there will be multiple lights. Some on the left, someone the right. Some maybe high, some a little lower. Two right next to each other. A Swiss driver is endowed with a special part of their DNA which automatically tells them which light is theirs. For foreigners, we can only guess, hope and pray. One light will be for the bus. One light will be for traffic going forward. One light may be for traffic going off at angles. There will be multiple arrows to choose from. It is a red, yellow and green game of concentration. More than once in my early days I chose the wrong light. My wife would shout. Swiss drivers would scowl. And my response was always, “But it was green!”. And in my defense, there was a green light. Just not the right one. Needless to say, months into it, I have adapted and realize that green does not always mean go!

Another fascinating driving experience has been the CIRCLE. Switzerland is full of traffic circles. They even decorate the center with sculptures and flowers. I have seen a rhinoceros, a unicorn, the tail of a Swiss airplane and innumerable sculptures of unknown meaning. In America, you enter a traffic circle and exit it. Simple. To a Swiss it is a dance. It is a Matador in the ring, waving of the cape, death defying moments of sheer madness and a blinker…maybe.

In theory one enters the circle at a break in traffic. This occurs when the preceding car indicates that it will be leaving the circle or the space in traffic is sufficient for gently easing into the flow at a reasonable and safe speed and distance. In reality, three things happen simultaneously that are not for the faint of heart. 1). Cars do not always indicate when they are exiting the circle. Therefore, one must apply an educated guess based on years of accumulated information, or go for it on a wing and a prayer. 2) Cars approaching the circle like to make others guess their intention so they approach at rapid speeds and then freeze abruptly at the edge of the circle. Heart palpitations ensue. There has been much cursing. 3) When Swiss drivers decide to enter, they like to reimagine the actual distance between cars traveling in the circle. A space of 3 meters suddenly expands to 20 in their minds and they dart into it like threading the eye of a needle. All of this happens at once. Race, Freeze, Guess, Dart, maybe indicate, squeeze….oh and watch for pedestrians in the crosswalks that line the edges. Because just when you think you made it, just when you think you are about to escape, like Han Solo flying out of the mouth of the giant asteroid slug thing. Boom. There is a person in the crosswalk. Traffic circles are not for the faint of heart.

And thinking about crosswalks…. In Switzerland, the pedestrian rules. They may cross at any yellow crosswalk with aplomb, an air of confidence and the aloofness of a King ignoring his subjects. Often these pedestrians like to keep one guessing until the very last possible moment. They will approach the crosswalk at a perpendicular angle, give no indication that they will be turning to cross, and then with the dexterity of an NBA pointguard, they will pivot, and go. I am surprised there are not more broken ankles from those hard pivot moves!

This crosswalk game of chicken moves to even greater levels at night when the Swiss like to wear dark clothes in the dark on dark streets. They appear like a deer in the wilderness; all of a sudden there is one in your headlights. I am considering starting a nationwide campaign for neon green socks that have to be worn at night.


Another fascinating complexity that hurts my brain is cars entering from the right. There are no right turns on red in Switzerland, but cars coming from the right have a certain amount of power. They are like the knight in a game of Chess. They can be powerful under certain rules and conditions. Cars can enter at will from the right always, or most of the time, or sometimes. They can enter if the road is just a road. They can enter regardless of other cars coming from any other direction. They can enter without pause. Unless…there is a sidewalk that crosses the road. Or there is a yield indication painted on the road. Or if there was a full moon three days before in a month with an R in the spelling. Trying to figure out when a car can turn in front of me and when it cannot has left me flummoxed more than once. Most of the time, I pause, pray, smile and hope that I did the right thing. And when I get it wrong, the Swiss are really good at making a face that says so!


Speeding. Speeding is a juxtaposition here in Switzerland. The Swiss are all about speed limits and speed enforcement, except where they think they can’t get caught. The Swiss have these ingenious moveable radar boxes that can be snuck into the smallest of places. They sit there, silent, waiting for the unsuspecting driver and then in a flash of bright light, nail them. These things are everywhere, and just when you memorize the location, they move them. I have been in Switzerland for eight months. In that time I have had two tickets from these automated menaces. My wife always said, DO NOT SPEED IN SWITZERLAND! And she was right. But then…why do people ride my bumper when I am dutifully driving the speed limit on the country roads? Why do people fly by me on the highway when I am obeying all the rules and scowl at me as they do it? Why do I witness the Swiss drive with abandon, ignore the speed limits and race along when everyone knows, DO NOT SPEED IN SWITZERLAND? I believe It is because of this funny little thing I have learned about the Swiss. They are people of rules. They like rules. They like precise. They like on time and they like organization. They like predictable and they like everyone to follow those rules…but themselves. I am convinced that there is this tiny little gene in all Swiss. It has been there for generations upon generations. It is the gene that says rules are very, very important, except when they apply to me, then they are suggestions. But they are very, very important for everyone else to follow. Society depends on it!

More on that in another brief look at Expat life in Switzerland; Land of Confusion and other fun facts…

Feel free to share your own thoughts!
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Old 14.01.2020, 13:34
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

European driving in general is different to US driving. It's not just Switzerland.

If Swiss driving prompts you to publish the above thesis, don't even think about driving in the UK.
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Old 14.01.2020, 13:43
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

Sorry to say, but if you have so much trouble with upcoming traffic from the right, roundabouts and hardly have a clue which traffic light is yours than you are just an incredible bad driver, please rip your license apart or take some lessons so you know what you are doing when driving a car.

Compared to many other places in Europe traffic in Switzerland is pretty calm and very decent, so whatever you do, do not cross the border before you have learned to drive.
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Old 14.01.2020, 13:51
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

I can’t help thinking that it would be a good idea to avail yourself of a couple of lessons with an instructor and study the Swiss theory a bit before you go out on the road again.
If you think Switzerland is bad I would avoid driving pretty much anywhere else in Europe if I were you.

The direct swapping of a US licence for a Swiss one really does seem like a bad idea in your case.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:02
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

Lights: yes, they're a mess. There's not standard location, I'll snap a pic of the most confusing light in my town, the light to make a left turn is much more prominent than the light to go straight. It is what it is.

Roundabouts (circles): I like to pass through without touching the brakes, firm grasp of the wheel, minimum car body roll...sorry, not sorry

Crosswalks: put on the shoes of pedestrians, walk more and you'll understand better their attitudes. I had no car for 5 years and now I have a great deal of patience for pedestrians. Some special lamps that highlight the crosswalks are being installed in many roads, they're great. Albeit in Romandie, they're discussing about turning off street lights after certain time because "light pollution"

Cars from the right: only on old city centers and streets marked with white paint to indicate it. If it looks medieval and no marks on the asphalt, assume people coming from the right go first.

Tailgaters: big trouble. Sometimes, I get scared of people driving old or high cars which are absolutely not capable of stopping if I have to do an emergency stop. Last night I drove the Gotthard tunnel, max speed 80, and some idiot was very close during the whole tunnel. My guess is that these people never look at the speed and just drive close to the bumper of the car in front assuming the people in front are respecting the limit.

Speeding, you don't have to speed to enjoy the drive. Some turns are fun even at 120 km/h, the car starts to roll in some turns at 80, other tighter turns and the tires are screeching even at 50. Also, some cars have a camera that reads speed signs and shows them to you in a heads-up display. No speed tickets since I got a car with this system. Also, look at the plates, quite probably the people passing you are from that canton and know where the cameras are. Finally, cruise-control. Some people pass me at 140+ on the highway, 5 minutes later I pass them because they realized they were going a bit fast.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:12
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

motorway slip roads, love em!

Lets join the motorway at 60kph, and just for kicks pull out into the overtake lane.

Lets leave the motorway using the motorway as the slip road, slow down to 60 a good 500m before the slip road starts.


Oh, and never, NEVER use the full slip road, half way, 60kph, pull out, job done

Unless you are an SZ driver, in which case blast past everyone queuing at 160 (because of that idiot doing 60 for the next junction) and cut in past the very last second at the front of the queue, bonus points for getting as close as possible to any cars not actually using that slip road
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:14
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

My advice would be to avoid Adliswil until you understand the traffic rules better.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:26
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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My advice would be to avoid Adliswil until you understand the traffic rules better.
LOL, (s)he could use the little part of the Soodstrasse in centre and the two roundabouts to practice :P

(tho for our sake, (s)he should use the S4 when wanting to go Adliswil)
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:26
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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Unless you are an SZ driver, in which case blast past everyone queuing at 160 (because of that idiot doing 60 for the next junction) and cut in past the very last second at the front of the queue
You do realize this is the recommended way (except the speed), don't you?
Search for Zipper Merge.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:27
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

When roundabouts were first introduced into France, they were known as cercles anglais. They're an English invention. Here's a magic roundabout.


For real fun, try the Arc De Triomphe in Paris. It looks like a roundabout, but has full priority to the right. You enter at high speed - then slam your brakes on.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:36
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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You do realize this is the recommended way (except the speed), don't you?
Search for Zipper Merge.
I hope you're never near me on a motorway!! speeding past a moving queue of traffic and cutting in (and cutting up people not turning off) IS NOT the recommended way to leave a motorway!!
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:44
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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I hope you're never near me on a motorway!! speeding past a moving queue of traffic and cutting in (and cutting up people not turning off) IS NOT the recommended way to leave a motorway!!
I think they quoted the wrong part of your post as their comment makes zero sense in relation to the part they quoted.

They probably meant to quote some (or all) of these bits.

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motorway slip roads, love em!

Lets join the motorway at 60kph, and just for kicks pull out into the overtake lane.



Oh, and never, NEVER use the full slip road, half way, 60kph, pull out, job done
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:45
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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speeding past a moving queue of traffic
I already mentioned "except for the speeding part". What more do you want from me?

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IS NOT the recommended way to leave a motorway!!
I had the impression we were talking about joining a motorway. My bad if it's about leaving.
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Old 14.01.2020, 14:51
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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my advice would be to avoid the world outside the usa until you understand the traffic rules better.
ftfy
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:07
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

Very entertaining, thank you. I don't usually read such long posts. (which is why I don't quote it all here, LOL).

As to priority to the right: When ever nothing special is indicated, it's priority to the right. Some of these spots are great for "selling" your car, if you want to get rid of it but still want some money for it.

I think the main problem for people from abroad is that everything is tiny here = there is always some sign to consider, a pedestrian - loads usually who all cross the street with a safety distance any driving teacher would dream of when teaching the drivers. You need to be alert here.
I personally always found driving in the US boring.
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:09
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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They probably meant to quote some (or all) of these bits.

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Lets join the motorway at 60kph, and just for kicks pull out into the overtake lane.

Oh, and never, NEVER use the full slip road, half way, 60kph, pull out, job done
They meant that is an acceptable behavior? Joinging the autobahn with 60 km/h is suicidal and the license should be revoked on spot.

If you get onto the acceleration strip (as it is called in German), you floor the pedal and accelerate. You should join the traffic at the same speed as the traffic. Also, as long as there is a solid line (w/ or w/o dashes) you are even allowed to undertake the cars and trucks on the autobahn. Very important on the new, extra long slipways.
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:13
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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When roundabouts were first introduced into France, they were known as cercles anglais. They're an English invention. Here's a magic roundabout.


For real fun, try the Arc De Triomphe in Paris. It looks like a roundabout, but has full priority to the right. You enter at high speed - then slam your brakes on.

This magic roundabout i have used very often, it's in Swindon and it is actually surprisingly fluid and easy to use
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:17
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

I have to point out that if you find driving in Switzerland difficult, don't dare move any further South and try and drive in Italy or the South of France. Traffic lights are purely decorative as are most road signs.
Roundabouts were generally brought over to Europe from the UK (though in the UK you drive round them the "other way") and they have spread very widely. In the US, my US friends tell me they're a speciality in Massachusetts. The idea is that they allow you to regulate the traffic at junctions with more fluidity than you get with traffic lights, though in my experience once the traffic is heavy, they don't work so well.
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:18
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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They meant that is an acceptable behavior?
I don’t know what they meant. I’m not a mind reader.

All I did was quote what I assumed to be the part of the post that they were replying to.
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Old 14.01.2020, 15:47
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Re: Random thoughts on driving in Switzerland

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When roundabouts were first introduced into France, they were known as cercles anglais. They're an English invention. Here's a magic roundabout.

.
Or the Hemel Hempstead roundabout, which is one large one consisting of 6 smaller ones. That was great fun, but actually very easy to navigate (if you keep your nerve).



An American friend of mine visited the UK many years ago, had never driven on the left and when he first encountered a roundabout he completely lost it. And promptly drove right over the middle of it.

But OP, I'm sorry to say, Switzerland generally is a very easy place to drive compared to many other places in Europe. I really don't recognise any of the problems that worry you!
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